Liquid Treat AgencySpy AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote TVSpy TVNewser PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC 10,000 Words GalleyCat MediaJobsDaily

museums

The Frick Collection Plans Expansion, Renovation

frick interior

How do you expand a museum renowned for its “jewel-box” exhibition spaces and intimately scaled rooms? Very carefully, not at all, or with the starchitectural zeal of the likes of Renzo Piano, depending on who you ask. The Frick Collection is leaning toward the first approach, with a scheme announced today that would add a six-story addition “in keeping with the scale and design of the original house and the library wing” (goods news for purveyors of Indiana limestone) while renovating and expanding the interior spaces added in the 1930s and 1970s.

The proposed plan would allow the Frick to open its second floor to the public but also require it to fill in the space currently occupied by a gated garden. The museum has tapped New York-based Davis Brody Bond to design the project, which would increase space by nearly a third. Get the full scoop in the Frick’s press release, take deep cleansing breaths, and then relax by watching director Ian Wardropper‘s recent chat with artist Ed Ruscha about some of his favorite Frick masterpieces.

Guggenheim Kicks Off Open Competition for Design of Future Helsinki Museum

helsinki

Pull up an Alvar Aalto-designed Stool 60, cue up your Sibelius playlist, and put on your Marimekko-patterned thinking cap, design fans, because Guggenheim Helsinki is coming. Today marks the launch of the Guggenheim Foundation’s open, international architectural competition—a first for an institution that has had a good run simply by commissioning architects named Frank when the need for a new building arises—for the design of the proposed art and design museum, which is to be located on city-owned land in the southwestern part of Helsinki’s South Harbor (you know, betwixt Eteläranta and Laivasillankatu).

Guggenheim Helsinki is to be a museum that “would organize and present internationally significant exhibitions of artworks from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries while also specializing in Nordic art and architecture. The museum would feature programs organized by the Guggenheim Foundation that might not otherwise be seen in Finland and would also generate exhibitions to be presented at other Guggenheim museums and at institutions around the world,” according to the proposal presented by the foundation last fall. A permanent collection would be developed over time. The construction budget is estimated at €130 million (approximately $177 million at current exchange).
Read more

MFA Boston to Debut Kunstkammer Gallery

mfa boston_b

Rare is the human who can resist a cabinet of curiosities—those bewitching, eclectic assortments of man-made and natural wonders that flout traditional taxonomies. The Museum of Fine Arts Boston is inaugurating one of its own in the Kunstkammer Gallery, which opens Wednesday. Among the objects that will be on view in the intimate space are exotic natural materials such as amber, ivory, and coconut shells; paintings on copper and hardstone; and virtuoso metalwork, such as clocks and automata. Follow up a visit to that whimsical space with a trip to the MFA’s newly renovated gallery dedicated to Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings and sculpture, which will also be unveiled on Wednesday.

Paul Giamatti as an Insane Museum Curator? Make It Happen!

boonewell

Picture it: A Fellini- and Buñuel-flavored tale of a museum curator grappling with dwindling visitor numbers, harsh economic realities, his crumbling sanity, and…a giant sloth! We were sold on the premise of graphic novelist Paul Hornschemeier‘s planned animated short film even before learning that the crazy curator, one Gordon Boonewell, will be voiced by Paul Giamatti. Saturday Night Live‘s dazzling Kate McKinnon has also signed on to the project, entitled Giant Sloth, which Hornschemeier is looking to fund through a freshly launched Kickstarter campaign.

“Uncompromised by the studio process, Giant Sloth combines the psychologically rich world of literary graphic novels with the all the possibilities of motion and sound that animation allows,” notes Hornschemeier. “It treats its characters not as clowns shuffling for an easy laugh, but as people. And as giant sloths. Giant sloths are people too.”
Read more

Cooper-Hewitt Appoints Brooke Hodge as Deputy Director

hodgeCurator, writer, and critic Brooke Hodge will join the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum as deputy director, a post that has been vacant since Caroline Baumann stepped up from that role in 2012 to serve as acting director following the death of Bill Moggridge. Baumann was named director of the museum last June. Hodge, who been director of exhibitions and publications at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles since 2010, will begin her new position on July 16 as the Cooper-Hewitt continues the countdown to its reopening after an epic renovation that will expand exhibition space by more than 60%. “I’ve known and admired Brooke since her involvement [as a guest curator] with the 2006 Triennial at Cooper-Hewitt, and I’m thrilled she is joining us at this critical juncture,” said Baumann in a statement released today. “Brooke will be diving into preparations for our opening later this fall, while partnering with me and museum teams on the exciting, future plans for the nation’s design museum.”

National Building Museum Explores ‘Designing for Disaster’

johnstown PA 1889The Washington Monument reopens to the public today—nearly three years after sustaining severe damage from the 5.8-magnitude earthquake that shook the East Coast in August 2011. Total cost of repairs to the towering obelisk? Approximately $15 million. Amidst rising costs associated with natural disasters, the National Building Museum is exploring new approaches to disaster resilience in “Designing for Disaster,” an exhibition that runs through August 2 of next year at the Washington, D.C. institution.

Organized by the destructive forces associated with each of the elements—earth, air, fire, and water, the show is a mix of case studies, artifacts (including singed opera glasses from the Waldo Canyon wildfire, and stone fragments from the earthquake-damaged National Cathedral), and immersive experiences (DIY disasters?) such as a “wall of wind” against which visitors can compare how various roof shapes perform in hurricane-force gales. Those that find even simulated disasters overwhelming can take refuge in the FEMA-specified tornado safe room.

SFMOMA to Honor Jonathan Ive

J_ive

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, now in the throes of an epic Snøhetta-designed expansion, is the not letting the absence of an HQ prevent it from bestowing its annual lifetime achievement award. This year’s recipient is Apple’s Jonathan Ive, who will be presented with the 2014 Bay Area Treasure Award at a dinner on October 30 (venue TBD). Past recipients include artists Wayne Thiebaud and Richard Serra, filmmaker George Lucas, and landscape architect Lawrence Halprin.
Read more

Smithsonian Joins Forces with Great Courses in Decade-Long Deal

great courses

In a bit of news that is in keeping this week’s fun-yet-educational theme, the Smithsonian Institution has inked a deal with The Great Courses (née The Teaching Company) to produce new courses devoted to history, science, culture, travel, music, and the arts. The ten-year licensing agreement calls for the purveyor of recorded lectures to draw upon the Smithsonian’s museums and collections for a staring-line up of twelve courses that will include “Experiencing America: A Smithsonian Tour through American History,” “A Visual Guide to the Universe,” and “The Great Tours and Smithsonian Journeys: Essential Sites of Rome, Venice, and Tuscany.” We suggest a “Museum Masterpieces: Cooper-Hewitt” edition to accompany the existing Great Courses that offer virtual tours of the Met, the Louvre, and London’s National Gallery.

Metropolitan Museum Debuts Roof Garden Commission: Dan Graham with Günther Vogt

Who needs a plain old terrace when you can have a Hedge Two-Way Mirror Walkabout? Nancy Lazarus heads to the roof of the Met to reflect on the matter.

met DG
(Photos: Hyla Skopitz, The Photograph Studio, The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

As the Metropolitan Museum of Art prepares to roll out the red carpet for its Costume Institute gala, it has rolled out a green carpet of grass turf for its annual roof garden exhibit: Two-Way Hedge Labyrinth Walkabout, a collaboration between American artist Dan Graham and Swiss landscape architect Günther Vogt.

“I designed the changing convex and concave pavilion as a funhouse for kids and a photo op for parents,” said Graham at Monday’s press preview. “The work relates to Central Park and to the earlier works in my collection.” Some of his prior projects are on view in a companion exhibit on the museum’s second floor. That multimedia display encompasses photos, architectural models, videos, and a smaller, triangular-shaped glass pavilion with circular cutouts.
Read more

Sneak Peek: Sagmeister & Walsh’s New Identity for Jewish Museum

jewish museum id

Stefan Sagmeister and Jessica Walsh of Sagmeister & Walsh are following up on “Six Things,” their mesmerizing, happiness-inducing 2013 exhibition at New York’s Jewish Museum, with a new graphic identity for the institution. It debuts tomorrow with a divine dominant blue and a deliberate script typeface that evokes the cadence and squared verticality of the Hebrew alphabet. Designed to evolve with the institution, the new identity system is “inspired by ancient sacred geometry fused with a sleek contemporary aesthetic,” according to the museum. The logo mark, logo typography, patterns, and illustrations were drawn on the same geometric grid from which the Star of David was formed. And stay tuned for the new website, also a Sagmeister & Walsh production. It debuts in June and will feature 3,000 collection objects (over 10% of the collection) with the goal of increasing to at least 20,000 works in the next five years.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>