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quote of note

Quote of Note | Elizabeth Diller

White iphone 4s using siri“Whenever I ask Siri for directions or a recommendation, I also ask her a trick question. Her answers are usually wacky. She scolds me for cursing, which I love, but she has no problem with ethics. If I say, ‘Remind me to rob a bank at 3 p.m.,’ she responds, ‘Here’s your reminder for today at 3 p.m.: Rob a bank. Shall I create it?’ She takes orders without imposing judgments, unlike some of my staff.”

-Architect Elizabeth Diller, partner at Diller Scofidio + Renfro, in the Wall Street Journal

Quote of Note | Steven Holl

vanke center

“In China, if I say, ‘This has never been done before,’ they get very excited. When we did a hybrid of a cable stay and a rigid concrete frame for the Shenzhen ‘horizontal skyscraper’ [Vanke Center, 2006-09, pictured]—spanning 50 meters between eight cores—they were very excited to do it. This would never happen in America. When I propose something here, they usually say, ‘Have you ever done this before? We’re worried about this. Can you show us some examples?’ The mindset here is conservative, provincial. Look at this tower outside my window. What kind of a mindset builds a tower that’s trying to look like a row house? It’s gross. I think that China is a very interesting place. Japan was the same way until their economic bubble burst, and it never came back.”

-Architect Steven Holl in an interview at his NYC studio with Pierre Alexandre de Looz that appears in PIN-UP

Quote of Note | Harold Koda

Charles James ballgown“[A]t the end of his life, if you went down to the street and said, ‘Charles James lives there,’ nobody would care. But think about Anna Piaggi—she had Antonio [Lopez] do all these drawings of his work immediately after he died. The people who were really savvy never forgot him. It’s just that he was never a household name, even when he was at his peak. He was always known as being at the cutting edge of the design world. I think what will happen with this exhibition is that fashionable people will come in, and they’ll be inspired by the colors and the shapes, but they will [translate] them in a more traditional way so that [the clothes] can be easily manufactured. But I think the people who will come away with even more inspiration will be industrial designers, graphic designers, and architects, because you will see such interesting ways of thinking.”

-Curator-in-charge of the Costume Institute Harold Koda, who organized “Charles James: Beyond Fashion” with Jan Glier Reeder. The exhibition is on view through August 10 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pictured: Clover Leaf Ball Gown designed in 1953 by Charles James

Quote of Note | Elliott Erwitt

erwitt m

“I was traveling, doing interviews for the Macallan project. In each place, we had an exhibition with photos from the book. The receptions were very nice. Some of the questions [from reporters] were rather stupid. In Moscow, there were 500 journalists—supposed journalists. Three or four of them were intelligent. One asked if I was there when the pictures were taken. I replied, ‘Probably.’”

-Photographer Elliott Erwitt in American Photo magazine

Quote of Note | Stefan Sagmeister

warhol covers

“He seemed to put a tremendous amount of energy into those covers; they are very carefully designed and beautifully produced. When he created them, he used his fame and star power. By that I mean it was unlikely that an unknown artist would have been able to persuade record companies to spend the extra money to produce art with those extreme production challenges and difficulties. Think about it. Having a zipper on an album cover? That was not an easy feat. It was expensive and it destroyed the records next to it. And the banana? With the peel, that you could actually peel. That also required extra cost and added necessary attention to production. Both covers are very interactive. The most legendary and memorable designs have always involved the viewer.”

-Stefan Sagmeister on Andy Warhol’s album covers for The Rolling Stones (Sticky Fingers) and the Velvet Underground in Thank You Andy Warhol by Catherine Johnson (Glitterati)

Quote of Note | Fred Tomaselli

FT
Collages from Fred Tomaselli’s ongoing New York Times series are among the new works on view through June 14 in an exhibition at James Cohan Gallery in New York. Pictured, from left: Feb. 11, 2009 (2014) and July 12, 2010 (2013).

“I stopped using pills in 2005. I still use leaves, though not necessarily pot. I use fig, grape, and rose leaves. The fact that you can’t tell the difference means, maybe, that anything I do now has become psychoactive in a way. Like, when I took the pills out, I replaced them with dots, with the idea that they functioned as placebos. Either that, or maybe they’re just dots.”

-Artist Fred Tomaselli interviewed by Paul Laster in Time Out New York

Quote of Note | Robert Mangold

mangold

“The paintings—my paintings anyway; I don’t know how everybody works—lead you. They almost give you answers. You’re working on something and it suggests taking it someplace else. I always talk about this idea of a dialogue between you and the work. I do it all by myself. And I’m not bragging about this, it’s not a big thing, but I don’t like having other people in the studio. I like stretching the paintings myself. I like drawing them myself. I like painting them myself. There is a kind of relationship to the making. So at one point I’m the maker, and then I sit down and I become the reader of what I’m doing, and then I go back to being the maker again. There’s almost this schizophrenic relationship.”

-Artist Robert Mangold interviewed by Alex Bacon in The Brooklyn Rail. An exhibition of Mangold’s work is on view through May 4 at Pace gallery in New York.

Quote of Note | Lowery Stokes Sims

artisan

“Despite [an] explosion of interest in and fostering of artisan skills, there is still a paucity of recognition of the individual hands of artisans in the rest of the world. While a product might be fitted with an identifying tag or label attached, little effort is made to identify, codify, and promote individual skill sets and styles. The anonymity that still tends to accompany the largely female-based global artisan and craft classes speaks clearly of the lack of diversity and accessibility to recognition that these creators are yet to attain in the global art market….Whether one agrees with the ‘rules of the game’ that govern the global art market, it is clear, however, that equality of opportunity and recognition for such craftswomen and artisans depends on the promotion of individual style and personality.”

-Lowery Stokes Sims, chief curator of the Museum of Arts and Design, on the state of international craft and its implications for the future of the field in The Brooklyn Rail

Quote of Note | Lorin Stein

spring 14 issue“We don’t have pressure to publish anything, or to satisfy a million subscribers. We have the luxury of being able to follow our own sensibility, wherever it takes us, at whatever length, with whatever kind of content. We can publish things that are risqué, or would put some people off. Until recently a clothing chain was carrying the Review. They complained that there was too much nudity in our last issue; they said they trusted that it would never happen again. We sent them the proof for the next issue, which sure enough had some nude photos from Francesca Woodman and they cancelled their order forever. And no one shed a tear. That’s a luxury not every magazine has.”

-Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review, in an interview with Svbscription.

Quote of Note | Kickstarter’s Yancey Strickler

strickler

“From the very beginning we decided—my co-founders and I—that we would never sell, never go public. We viewed Kickstarter as a public trust. This is a place of opportunity for anyone to make their thing happen, and it’s our job to be the stewards of it and to honor it. We were looking at growing this into a living, breathing cultural institution that’s there to represent the interests of everybody. And we think the best way to do that is to be a privately held, independently controlled organization—and that’s exactly what we are.”

-Kickstarter co-founder and CEO Yancey Strickler in an interview with Charlie Rose for Bloomberg Businessweek.

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