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The Revolving Door

V&A’s Glenn Adamson to Lead Museum of Arts And Design

Craft theorist and historian Glenn Adamson has been tapped to direct the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. He comes to MAD (beginning October 15) from London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, where he serves as Head of Research, a role that has encompassed initiating and shaping major exhibitions (he co-curated the V&A’s recent Postmodernism show), managing partnerships with museums and universities, and leading academic fundraising, among other responsibilities. Adamson succeeds Holly Hotchner, who stepped down at the end of April.

It’s a pivotal moment for MAD. In addition to a directorial changing of the guard, chief curator and VP of collections David Revere McFadden will retire from his position at the end of 2013, capping off a 16-year tenure at the museum. Meanwhile, plans are well underway for next year’s fifth anniversary celebration (can it be that long since MAD moved into its quirky Columbus Circle home?), which will include “Inspired,” an exhibition showcasing works that have joined the museum’s collection since the opening of its new building in 2008.

Wanted: Art and Photo Intern Who Gets Lucky

As those charming French robots have been reminding us lately, “We’ve come too far to give up who we are / So let’s raise the bar and our cups to the stars”—and our professional sights to the most shopping-obsessed corner of Planet Conde Nast. That would be Lucky, where newly installed editor-in-chief and “nail art” aficionado Eva Chen is all about a $250 holographic leather baseball cap for fall.

Whether you’re up all night to get some or just for good fun, the hunt is on for an art and photo intern who gets Lucky. The magazine about shopping is in the market for “a junior or senior at a U.S. college or university majoring in graphic design, photography, or studio art, with an interest in multimedia, fashion, current editorial and historical photography, and with strong communication and interpersonal skills.”

Learn more about this art and photo intern, Lucky job or view all of the current Mediabistro design, art, and photo jobs.

Jeffrey Deitch to Step Down as MOCA Director

Dealer-turned-director Jeffrey Deitch is poised to part ways with the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, the Los Angeles Times reports. He is expected to step down with just under two years left in his five-year contract. “One person, who was not authorized to speak publicly, said that Deitch was ‘choosing to step down,’” wrote Mike Boehm in an article published today. “Another person who has spoken to Deitch said that MOCA is expected to announce Deitch’s exit along with the news that the museum is nearing completion of a fundraising campaign it announced in March to boost its endowment from about $20 million to $100 million.” Stay tuned for the press release, which is reportedly due following a MOCA board meeting scheduled for tomorrow. And L.A.’s loss may be New York’s (re)gain. B.L.A.T.C. reports that Deitch is already on the hunt for an apartment and a gallery space on the Upper East Side.

Fortune Taps Tim Leong as Design Director

The bubbling vat of creative talent at Wired magazine has yielded a new design director for Fortune. Tim Leong will join the Time Inc. title on August 5. He was previously director of digital design at Wired and is also a newly published author: Leong’s Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe is out today from Chronicle Books.

“He is a multi-talented guy who worked on all aspects of the Wired brand with an emphasis his last two years on the digital extensions, including all tablet editions, coordinating motion and programming, e-books, e-features, as well as working directly with the website,” wrote Fortune creative director (and fellow Wired veteran) Brandon Cavulla in an e-mail sent today. “Tim was also a part of Wired‘s conferences, working with me on motion graphics/film and overall identity.” He succeeds Emily Kehe, who left Fortune in December and is now creative director at People StyleWatch.

Magnum Photos Adds Olivia Arthur and Peter van Agtmael as Full Members

Magnum Photos has added to its esteemed ranks: Olivia Arthur and Peter van Agtmael were voted in as full members at last week’s general meeting in London. Both joined the agency as nominees in 2008. London-based Arthur has been photographing professionally since 2003 and has already racked up awards including the Royal Photographic Society’s Vic Odden Award and the OjodePez-PhotoEspana Award. Her first book, Jeddah Diary, about young women in Saudi Arabia, was published last year. Van Agtmael, a Yale grad with honors such as the ICP Infinity Award and a W. Eugene Smith grant under his belt, has focused his work in recent years on the Middle East, covering the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and their effects on life in America. A collection of his combat photography, 2nd Tour Hope I Don’t Die, was published in 2009.

Magnum has also welcomed a new nominee member in Michael Christopher Brown. The Washington native, who often uses his camera phone in the field, got a close-up of his own in the recent HBO documentary Witness: Libya, about his experiences during the 2011 Libyan Revolution. His latest project examines resource conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Elizabeth Chu Richter Elected 2015 AIA President

The American Institute of Architects wrapped up its national convention last weekend in Denver, and along with a keynote address by Architecture for Humanity co-founder Cameron Sinclair, delegates enjoyed an insider’s tour of the Daniel Libeskind- and Gio Ponti-designed buildings of the Denver Art Museum, got their copies of Combinatory Urbanism signed by Thom Mayne, and paused between sessions to enjoy scoops from Little Man Ice Cream, located inside a 28-foot steel replica of an old-fashioned milk can. There was also an election: Elizabeth Chu Richter, the CEO of Richter Architects in Corpus Christi, Texas, emerged victorious in her bid for the 2015 presidency of AIA. “I’m hoping that my leadership will help bring the AIA into a more member-focused future, building greater public engagement and understanding, while also refining the Institute’s leadership structure and operation focus,” said Richter, a member of the AIA National Board of Directors representing Texas. She’ll begin her term as first vice-president/president-elect in 2014.

Speed Art Museum Selects New Director

Louisville’s Speed Art Museum, in the midst of a three-year expansion project, has found a new director in Ghislain d’Humières (pictured), director of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art at the University of Oklahoma. He will succeed Charles Venable, who departed last fall to take the top job at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. D’Humières’ first day on the job is September 3.

At OU, he led a $15 million capital campaign as well as the development and management of the museum’s new 20,000 square-foot Stuart wing. D’Humières previously served as assistant director at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco during the construction of the de Young Museum of Art. “His essential role in the opening and logistical organization of the $320 million, 290,000 square foot de Young project at the Fine Art Museum of San Francisco, was one of many contributing factors leading to the search committee’s decision to hire Ghislain,” said Allan Latts, chair of the Speed Art Museum’s board of trustees in a statement issued today. “He also initiated innovative partnerships with the University of Oklahoma and its stakeholders that broadened the museum’s reach throughout the community.”

Stuart Vevers Named Creative Director of Coach

Coach has decided who will have the daunting task of following Reed Krakoff at the creative helm: Stuart Vevers, the designer who jolted LVMH-owned leathergoods brand Loewe back to life with his modern, colorful take on the house’s Spanish heritage. As executive creative director of Coach, he’ll be responsible for leading all creative aspects of the Coach brand, including women’s and men’s design, brand imagery, and store environments–at a time when the American accessories giant is looking to shore up its dipping North American market share by going the lifestyle brand route (first order of business: a focus on footwear).

Vevers served as artistic director of Loewe from 2008 and before that spent three years as creative director of Mulberry. His previous experience includes stints at Calvin Klein, Bottega Veneta, Givenchy, and Louis Vuitton, where he worked under Marc Jacobs. “I think I learned the most from Marc and he was good and fun to work with, but it was the first time I’d seen how hands-on and how precise he was as a creative director, knowing every stitch color,” said Vevers in a 2012 interview. “I mean, it was taking it to the next level and that impressed me.”

Metropolitan Museum of Art Names Susan Sellers Head of Design

Susan Sellers, founding partner and creative director of New York-based design consultancy 2×4, is moving on up, to the East Side, where on Monday, June 24, she’ll begin her new role as head of design at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. In overseeing the museum’s department of design, Sellers will lead a cadre of specialists–in installation, graphic, and lighting design–that attend to everything from signage and printed materials to exhibitions and gallery installations.

Sellers, who is also senior critic in graphic design at Yale School of Art, comes to the Met with extensive experience working with museums. 2×4 has developed graphic identities for the likes of PS1 and the Brooklyn Museum, and Sellers has cultivated the studio’s approach to brand identity for museums and public institutions including the Guggenheim, Longwood Gardens, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. She has also designed exhibitions for clients such the Guggenheim and the Storefront for Art and Architecture–as well as Nike and Prada. “Her design work is both elegant and strategic,” noted Metropolitan Museum director Thomas Campbell in a statement announcing Sellers’ appointment, “and I look forward to having her develop a design vision for the Met that speaks to the museum’s diverse collections and audiences.”

Caroline Baumann Named Director of Cooper-Hewitt Museum

This just in: Caroline Baumann, who has served as acting director of the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, since the death of Bill Moggridge last September, can dispense with the “acting.” She has been named director, effective June 16. Baumann joined the Cooper-Hewitt from the Museum of Modern Art in 2001, and served as associate director, acting director, and deputy director before stepping in for Moggridge.

“Caroline is passionate about design and reaching people—physically and digitally—with its lessons and insights,” said Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough in a statement issued today. “She has been key in the museum’s growing success over the years and has been especially adept at forming substantive partnerships in New York, in Washington, across the nation and, indeed, around the world.”

The appointment comes amidst the countdown to the Cooper-Hewitt’s 2014 reopening following a $54 million renovation and expansion. Said Baumann, “We’re rolling out an extraordinary plan for a vibrant future and establishing Cooper-Hewitt as the Smithsonian’s design lens on the world.”

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