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Watch: Calder | Prouvé at Gagosian Paris

Alexander Calder and Jean Prouvé get a joint close-up in an exhibition at Gagosian Paris. Organized with Galerie Patrick Seguin, “Calder | Prouvé” mixes the biomorphic mobiles and stabiles of the former with the smooth yet strong furniture and architectural projects of the latter. Born three years and an ocean apart, the two met in the early 1950s, became pen pals (although we’re pretty sure they didn’t use that term), and later collaborated on the steel base of “La Spirale,” Calder’s mega-mobile for UNESCO HQ in Paris. Gagosian has created this virtual tour of the exhibtion, on view at its Le Bourget space through November 2:

Watch: The Bouroullecs’ Quiet Motion

Surely one of the most mesmerizing installations at this year’s Salone del Mobile was Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec‘s “Quiet Motion,” a quartet of cork platforms that rotated, slowly and silently, in the cloister of a Milanese monastery. The installation, presented in partnership with BMWi, was designed “as an allegorical interpretation of movement and contemplation,” according to the brothers, who interpreted the concept of sustainable mobility with materials including fabrics made of the sustainable wool yarn that will be used in the electric car’s seat upholstery and lightweight carbon columns created using renewable energy sources. Here’s a cinematic souvenir of the project: the Quiet Motion film, directed by Juriaan Booij:

What’s the Opposite of Kickstarter?

Nope, not communism–it’s Kickstopper, a “website that raises funding to crush people’s dreams, at the exact moment when they need to be crushed.” The team from YouTube’s Universal Comedy channel imagines the anti-crowdfunding force with the help of a trio of floundering creative entrepreneurs: a guy who once yearned to make a semi-autobiographical film about his failed college romance (“set in the Jazz Age” and featuring “a wide variety of fedoras”), a young woman who looked to Kickstarter to make her glassblowing dreams come true, and an inventor of a killer smartphone accessory.

Watch: Albert Vecerka on Architectural Photography

Taking a good photo of a great building is no easy task, as Flickr or Instagram can demonstrate. Meanwhile, even the most expansive Pinterest page of stunning architectural images is likely to feature the work of a relatively small group of photographers–those who have mastered the tricky art and science of capturing the utility, spirit, and beauty of the designed environment. Many of those names are followed by “Esto,” the firm built on the image collection of Ezra Stoller. Esto assignment photographer Albert Vecerka was on hand last week at the Cooper-Hewitt Design Center for the latest in the museum’s “Harlem Focus” series. “I look to tell a story about a place; a neighborhood, a building, a room,” Vecerka has said. “Looking for the right light, right day, or right time of day is a part of that narrative, and it is no different for commercial assignments than for personal projects.” Watch the event below and then mark your calendar for June 26, when architectural historian John Reddick will be joined by curators and gardeners from the Central Park Conservatory Gardens to talk “Garden Design: The Art of Color, Variety, and Form.”

On the Enduring Attraction of Fridge Magnets

“They kind of exist at the spiritual center of our lives, really,” says Dave Kapell of refrigerator magnets. And he should know. The Minneapolis-based musician-slash-inventor is the founder of Magnetic Poetry, which has sold over three million kits (that’s more than a billion word tiles) worldwide. Faith Salie chatted up Kapell and more magnet magnates–including Louise Greenfarb, who made the Guinness Book of Records for owning the most refrigerator magnets in the world (45,000, but who’s counting?)–for this recent CBS Sunday Morning segment, which concludes by considering the bane of magnet lovers everywhere: the stainless steel fridge.

Watch: Rick Owens on Serenity, Foam, and Klimt-Inspired Hairdos

Rick Owens, how do we love thee? Let us count the pricey bruise-hued t-shirts. The buyers at Italian boutique Antonioli caught up with the designer in Paris following his spring 2013 womenswear show to discuss inspiration, hairstyles inspired by the work of Gustav Klimt, and foam, which bubbled down in clouds along the back wall of the runway. Enjoy a few minutes of Owens’s musings on ferocity, serenity, islands, and “creating a hallucinogenic vision of warmth and loveliness.”

Watch: Gary Baseman and Die Antwoord’s ‘Buckingham Warrior’

Holocaust survivor Ben Baseman spent four years fighting off Nazis in the birch forests of what was then Poland (now part of Ukraine). Decades later, the episode inspired his son, Gary, to create the Buckingham Warrior, a “defender of strong ideals and a stark reminder to the fragility of our own ecology.” The artist, illustrator, and cult toy maker’s multi-headed deer character comes alive in a new MOCAtv animated short released to coincide with Baseman’s megashow, “The Door Is Always Open,” on view through August 18 at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles. Directed by David Charles and animated by Peter Markowski, the allegorical tale plays out against a raging score by the South-African rap-rave duo Die Antwoord.

Google Pays Doodle Tribute to Saul Bass

Design legend Saul Bass would have turned 93 today, and Google is celebrating his creative legacy with one of its most elaborate daily “doodles” yet. Visit the search giant’s homepage before midnight to see and watch the tribute, an animated riff on some of Bass’s most well-known film titles, including those for The Man With the Golden Arm, Anatomy of a Murder, and Around the World in 80 Days. And turn those speakers up, because this doodle is in stereo, set to Dave Brubeck‘s “Unsquare Dance.”

Watch: Elsa Schiaparelli on What’s My Line?

It’s time to swap the surreal shoe hats for safety pin-encrusted fedoras as the Metropolitan Museum of Art puts the artfully distressed finishing touches on “PUNK: Chaos to Couture,” which will be unveiled to attendees of the Costume Institute gala on Monday evening and then opens to the public on Thursday. But before we say “ciao” to Elsa Schiaparelli, who shared the spotlight last spring in a series of “impossible conversations” with Miuccia Prada, we bring you video of her 1952 appearance on What’s My Line?, in which she attempted to preserve her “Mystery Guest” status as long as possible by grunting answers to the panelists’ yes or no questions.

Previously on UnBeige:
Frank Lloyd Wright on What’s My Line?
Schiaparelli and Prada: Sneak a Peek at the Met’s ‘Impossible Conversations’
Chaos to Couture: Metropolitan Museum Goes Punk for 2013 Costume Institute Exhibition

Watch This: Laurie Anderson on Julian Schabel

The awards-gala season is in full swing, and Creative Time is cooking up a night to remember at Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar Factory. The arts organization, which recently trotted out Nick Cave‘s soundsuited steeds in Grand Central terminal, will cap off the month with an April 30 benefit to honor the multitalented Julian Schnabel. Mario Batali is handling the food, daughter Lola is crafting the playlist, and the likes of Laurie Anderson and Al Pacino are lining up to praise the man of the moment in charming yet succinct video tributes. As you prepare to fetch your credit card to buy a ticket (after all, gala proceeds provide nearly a third of Creative Time’s annual budget), watch Anderson’s salute to Schnabel:

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