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Posts Tagged ‘Frank Gehry’

Dangerous Curves Ahead: Gehry Sued By MIT

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When we heard that Frank Gehry had been sued, it was not, as we had expected, by Barry Diller for designing a structurally-unsound InterActiveCorp HQ unable to support all internet entities within. Instead, he’s being hung out to dry by MIT, who is claiming its Stata Center (angular strife illustrated in AP photo to the right) has “serious design flaws”:

The school alleges the center, completed in spring 2004, has persistent leaks, drainage problems and mold growing on its brick exterior. It says accumulations of snow and ice have fallen dangerously from window boxes and other areas of its roofs, blocking emergency exits and causing damage.

Another story in the Boston Globe gets several experts to talk about the “disaster,” “risks” and “leaking,” including the author of a book we imagine has more than a few chapters on Gehry: Architecture of the Absurd: How ‘Genius’ Disfigured a Practical Art.

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Bucher, Lehrer and Trollback: What’s Next

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This morning we ducked into a three-fer session moderated by Steven Heller called Works in Progress. It goes without saying that we can never get enough of Stefan Bucher‘s Daily Monsters, an obsessive, compulsive, and as Heller says, possibly psychotic addiction. But today Bucher revealed that he actually started with the monsters during a difficult time in his life: “I found comfort in ink.” The book is coming this spring, here’s proof. He’s also working on all the products for the next 826 retail store: LA’s Echo Park Time Travel Mart

The second presentation is difficult to reproduce here but we’ll try. Warren Lehrer in essence “performed” his book-in-progress named Rise and Fall of Bleu Mobley: A Life in Books, an illuminated novel about the 101 books created by his alter ego, Bleu Mobley. Lehrer actually designed book covers and wrote excerpts for all 101 books, which he’s compiled into this crazy narrative that chronicles Mobley’s early fiction, a string of self-help books, and finally, his habit of blurring fiction with nonfiction, which results in him being jailed. Someone needs to publish this book, but most importantly, you should run if you ever get a chance to see Lehrer present this project.

Seeing as he’s a former DJ, it was fitting that Jacob Trollback, opened with some music to set the mood. Then he presented the absolutely stunning work for an animated wall inside the rippling waves of Frank Gehry‘s InterActiveCorp building. Each InterActiveCorp entity was rendered in a gorgeous little narrative: time-lapse blooming flowers for a dating site, beautiful digital clocks, an iconic 3D newsfeed, and the most incredible computer generated animation for a travel site, where the simple rolling footage of telephone poles, overpasses, train cables and a single plane sailing through the blue sky tells you everything you need to know about the thrill of going places.

All AIGA NEXT coverage here.

Herbert Muschamp Dies at 59

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We were hearing a few reports that design writer and former architecture critic for the New York Times Herbert Muschamp died last night, and the paper has just posted an obit by Nicolai Ouroussoff:

As the architecture critic for The Times from 1992 to 2004, Mr. Muschamp seized on a moment when the repetitive battles between Modernists and Post-Modernists had given way to a surge of exuberance that put architecture back in the public spotlight. His openness to new talent was reflected in the architects he championed, from Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Zaha Hadid and Jean Nouvel, now major figures on the world stage, to younger architects like Greg Lynn, Lindy Roy and Jesse Reiser and Nanako Umemoto.

Thanks to our new all-access passes to the NYT archives, you can curate your own Muschamp tribute from his hundreds, maybe thousands of articles.

50 Very Short Essays on Michael Bierut

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There once was a designer so beloved that on the occasion of his 50th birthday, people from far and wide wanted to wish him well. So well, in fact, that the kingdom of Pentagram–housed in a castle in the biggest city in all the land–sent word to all their friends, all over the world, that they wanted to write a book dedicated to the fair designer. And it was a grand book, a book filled with 50 stories by people like the Valiant Knight Frank Gehry and Sir Massimo Vignelli and Lady Maira Kalman. And because the designer was so beloved, and because his friends were so kind, the book even included pictures. Like this:

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Happy Belated Birthday to the King of Design.

Frank Gehry’s F-Me Shirt-Wearing Promotional Campaign Pays Off In Spades

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Whether he’s busy screwing himself or trying hard to get others to screw him, Frank Gehry‘s publicity stunt is certainly working. In yesterday’s Times Mag, Pilar Viladas drops the Fuckable One’s name in two separate articles .

Here’s #1:

In the 1970s and ’80s, Southern California was a hotbed of architectural experimentation. Buildings by Thom Mayne and Michael Rotondi of Morphosis, Frank Gehry, Eric Owen Moss and others challenged conventional notions of how we live and work, thrilling some observers and horrifying others.

And love letter #2:

The notion of limited-edition design–which is all the rage now and which loomed large last month at Art Basel and its offshoot, Design Miami/Basel–was not born yesterday. Indeed, the Swiss furniture company Vitra embraced it 20 years ago when it started Vitra Edition, which offered a way for cutting-edge architects and designers–like Ron Arad, Frank Gehry, Shiro Kuramata, Ettore Sottsass and others–to do experimental work without the constraints of production or the market.

Because, really, what can’t that god among men do?

Philip Nobel Strikes (Down Starchitects) Again

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Has it only been a month since Philip Nobel thrust upon us his revolutionary architecture treatise topped with a rather hearty helping of critic skewering? This time, he takes on the starchitect, and not just the star architects themselves, but the origins of the term and its usefulness therein. But the very best part of “Anti-Starchitect Chic” is when Nobel divulges just how far one starchitect will go to play the fame game:

Gehry, of course, is an expert at managing his fame. Perhaps that’s why he felt compelled recently to deliver to me a T-shirt tastefully printed with “Fuck Frank Gehry,” and insist by proxy (the New York-based creator of the shirts acting as courier) that I wear it at the 2007 Temko Critics Panel (“What to Make of Starchitecture, and Who to Blame for It”). Apparently the shirts are popular at the offices of Gehry Partners LLP, and Frank was feeling frisky. My fellow panelists were amused and assumed I was a sellout, so it did have an effect on the proceedings. But I declined to wear the gift–ethics, you know, and anyway I prefer to get paid to advertise–and I responded by sending back a shirt with my name and a similar blunt message. May he wear it in good health–in front of as many cameras as possible.

The good news is, “Fuck Philip Nobel” has quite a nice ring to it as well.

You Say You Want a Rem-olution?

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In William Drenttel‘s current article on Design Observer, he criticizes Rem Koolhaas‘ bad decisions in his most recent project, the Central Chinese Television Headquarters. But during a two-night speaking stand in LA and San Francisco last month, Koolhaas had a surprising message for the design masses: Starchitects (himself included) are too busy trying to win contests with individualistic, extravagant work to devote serious thought to the true impact of their projects. You can watch Koolhaas’ appearance at USC (click lecture series), or read the reviews: John King from the San Francisco Chronicle covered the SF appearance and Rob Forbes was there, too, but more in awe of Koolhaas’ koolness. It’s almost as if Koolhaas has been rehearsing for the inevitable attacks against him.

Apparently, Koolhaas has also been rehearsing his dead-on impersonation of Nosferatu.

Gehry Pumps Iron Not Attached To Disney Hall

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We’re with Jimmy Kimmel when it comes to preserving the privacy of celebrities, but if you see an architect “visibly intoxicated” or looking like Jabba the Hutt, heaven help you, send that baby in. We’re thrilled when architects are high-profile enough to be included in things like Defamer’s Hollywood PrivacyWatch, where Frank Gehry was spotted working out at the Gold’s Gym in his ‘hood (Gehry is seen demonstrating the size of his biceps in the photo above):

Of all the freaky-deaky things: Frank Gehry…at Venice’s Gold’s Gym? There was a funny moment when the master builder snapped at some meathead who dropped his 9,000-lb. weights to the floor with a deafening crash. Then Meathead snapped back at Gehry, “Ya wanna hear some noise, go to one a your damn sites!” The whole thing is just so surreal. After Bilbao, why ab crunches?

Yes, the New Yorker’s Having an Innovation Conference, and Yes, the Irony Is Killing Us

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Eustace Tilly might as well be getting LASIK. With a lineup that’s plucked from the design and technology conferences of the past year, the New Yorker Conference/2012: stories from the near future is rallying to be a heavyweight for those of the innovation persuasion:

“It’s the ultimate insider’s look at the works in progress that will shape our world, from boardrooms to courtrooms, from biology labs to design studios.”

Design studios indeed: Yves & Curls will be in attendance, as will be Miss Zaha, plus our interactive angels Will Wright and Craig Newmark. You even get to hang out at the IAC/InterActiveCorp building “designed by Frank Gehry.

And all this can be yours for the low price of $1200, but think about it this way: That’s $600 to hang out with David Remnick and $600 for Malcolm Gladwell. Not sold? Watch the video. They talk about Google!