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Posts Tagged ‘Greg Lindsay’

The Man Behind the Monocle

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It’s time to check in on the health of almost-a-year-old Monocle, the newest magazine founded by young whippersnapper Tyler Brûlé (whose last name reads like a phone number in HTML code). Greg Lindsay asks him what he does when running the new mag, and Brûlé’s answers are pretty much nothing less than, you know, like, dominate the world and stuff:

I think some day we can take this up to a circulation of over 200,000 globally. That’s a dream, not our business plan. There’s definitely a constituency of readers who left Wallpaper* who’ve picked up with us and a whole new group of readers who’ve never even heard of Wallpaper*. I think Monocle’s readership is more interested in bigger ideas and doesn’t see a wall between politics and culture.

They’re also interested in the whopping $150 subscription price, apparently.

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Stephen Drucker, Editor of House Beautiful, Says His Shelter Mag Is Sturdy

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With the demise of both House & Garden and Blueprint announced in the last two months, we can’t imagine any shelter pub is feeling tremendously confident closing out 2007. But according to an interview with Greg Lindsay, Stephen Drucker, editor in chief of House Beautiful, says their failures don’t mean the shelter world is coming tumbling down:

It doesn’t necessarily say anything about the rest of category. It’s terrible to see any magazine die, but you can also read too much into it. It’s a reflection of one magazine’s strategy and one company’s business. It’s like saying, because one store goes out on Madison Avenue, that “Uptown is dead.” They’re not really connected. There’s always competition, there’s always turmoil in media, things are constantly changing, and that’s the ins and outs of running a business. We’ve had enormous successes here in the last two years at House Beautiful, that really show you that it’s about creating a magazine for what the marketplace wants.

A former editor at Martha Stewart Living, Drucker says recent changes in the market are really no biggie to the ancient (1896!!!) magazine which has had to continuously evolve over the last century, including increasing the page size because, quite simply, “People buy shelter magazine because of the pictures. That’s what it’s all about.”

Luke Hayman Divulges Pentagram’s Wicca-like Traditions

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In preparation for Thursday night’s Golden Boa Awards, mb.com tossed a few questions to the honorees, including design’s resident boa-wearer, Luke Hayman. Greg Lindsay asks Hayman “How’d You Reach The Design World’s Pinnacle?” although we can’t say that sounds like a very comfortable place to work.

Hayman doles out advice and tells some great stories about his early days at mags from Brill’s Content to Cablevision, but our favorite part of the interview is where we learn the fraternity rush methods of choosing a new Pentagram partner:

How long had you been talking with Pentagram, and how does one start talking to Pentagram in the first place?

Joining Pentagram is a lengthy process. I’m in touch with a guy in London who has been talking to them for 11 years. For me, it was more like a year. You have to fly to each office and meet everyone, and have dinner with them. They’ve seen the work, they like the work, and they want to see how you present yourself, the work, and your philosophy, and basically see if they like having dinner with you.

It sounds like you were joining a secret society.

[Laughs] It really does, especially with the name ‘Pentagram.’ It’s the Wicca Society.

Ah, so that’s why Michael Bierut was running around without his pants. Hazing.