Liquid Treat AgencySpy AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote TVSpy TVNewser PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC 10,000 Words GalleyCat MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Khoi Vinh’

Debbie Millman’s Party Packs the House

massimo_debbie.jpg

As we lamented that we couldn’t be there to toast Debbie Millman‘s book release (and revealed we were drinking ourselves to sleep instead) one faithful UnBeige reader had the presence of mind to document the evening. Jonathan Selikoff got three shots, including one of Millman basking in Massimo Vignelli‘s charm above (those Vignellis sure do get out a lot). He also tells us that just as Simon Williams gave a nice, rambling toast on behalf of Millman, there was a chant of “Debbie! Debbie! Debbie!”

Also spotted by our informants: Paul Sahre, James Victore, Felix Sockwell, Rodrigo Corral (who designed her book’s cover), Khoi Vinh, Scott Stowell and Emily Oberman, plus a report that in the elevator on the way down, a woman said that if a bomb had gone off in the room, the NY design scene would cease to exist. Sounds like our kind of party.

More pics…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelance Writing: Advanced

Freelance Writing: AdvancedGet better assignments, increase revenue, and gain exposure as a freelancer! Starting September 16, students will learn how to promote themselves as a writer on the web and social media, develop relationships with editors, boost their income, and other skills to improve their freelance careers. Register now!

Blog O’Fear: The Rules and Etiquette of Blogging (Featuring Us!)

blogofear.jpg

Bless that Liz Danzico for live-blogging this blogging panel while we were talking about blogging.

The panel, moderated and concepted by Steve Heller, no stranger to blogs as editor of AIGA Voice, writer for a daily design column in PRINT online, writer for Design Observer and A Brief Message and countless others, was to talk about blogs–their journalism aspect, their memoir form, and other forms they might take.

The all-star panel are luminaries in the design blog world:

  • Khoi Vinh, design director of NYTimes.com, and editor of Subtraction.com, which is seven years old, and A Brief Message, founded this year.
  • Bill Drenttel, co-founder of Design Observer, which just turned four years old.
  • Allan Chochinov, editor of Core 77 the industrial design supersite (not a portal), and also runs Coroflot.com, and Design Directory.com (“a blog negative”), for an amazing 13 years.
  • Alissa Walker, editor of UnBeige and, freelance writer. Her goal on UnBeige is to post “every 20 minutes or so.” She is proud that UnBeige is called the People of design blogs.
  • Tina Roth Eisenberg, author behind Swiss Miss, and responsible for too many “major credit card purchases.”

    If A Blog Falls in the Woods
    The panel started out on a pretty philosophical note, dissecting what having a “blog” really means. According to Eisenberg blogs are really just “sites with a content management system.” Vinh jumped in and immediately disagreed, pointing out that he thinks blogs are really a conversation between writer and audience in any more. Writers engaging with an audience; commenters engaging with other commenters; and traditional journalists with commeters. Walker, like Chochinov, uses the blog as a traffic driver. “The blog is just one ingredient,” he put out there.

    Read more

  • Khoi Vinh Says Don’t Be Scared of the Web, You’re Actually Gaining Control

    mrpreskhoi.jpg

    Our good friend Khoi Vinh (a regular in this parts) served as a clear, soothing voice to what we guess are many print designers in the audience who are still scared shirtless about the web.

    We won’t go into much detail because Vinh is very good about posting his presentations on his blog, but here’s the simple argument he gave that should make all designers boohooing about the internet think twice.

    If narrative is the guiding principle of print, then interactive media is not narrative, it’s about behavior. And designing for behavior transfers some control away from the designers, and–as designers often think–gives control to the users.

    However, when you produce a printed piece, the design is indeed “baked in,” and it lives in a static state. But when you put content on the web, you actually don’t lose control, you gain the multiplicity of states. Therefore, your role as a designer isn’t reduced, you actually have more jobs to do–and you have to do it better and in more ways.

    Good narrative gives rise to good conversations. So use the very best of your design skills and traditional design values online, and as new web tools evolve, they will actually be tools that support designers (thanks to advocates like Vinh), so you’ll gain even more control.

    So take a deep breath and proceed.

    All AIGA NEXT coverage here.

    Life Is Short, Read A Brief Message

    070904_a_brief_message.gif

    Well, well, well, would you looky here. It seems there’s a new blog in town. A Brief Message is design criticism that you’re able to bite off, chew up, swallow and digest before you finish plowing through the intro paragraph of some other sites. It’s shorter, it’s faster, and it’s published by two very good friends of the Un, Khoi Vinh and Liz Danzico.

    Vinh and Danzico both explain the concept and strategy in-depth on their own blogs, but boiled down (appropriately), here’s the deal:

    A Brief Message features design opinions expressed in short form. Somewhere between critiques and manifestos, between wordy and skimpy, Brief Messages are viewpoints on design in the real world. They’re pithy, provocative and short–200 words or less.

    The pieces will also be illustrated, a nice touch for looping in some new and established designers and illustrators. Plus we’ll venture to give some advice to anyone wanting to launch a design blog: Leading with Steven Heller is a pretty darn good way to get started.

    Serving Inspiration (and Gelato) at the Portfolio Center

    Ciao-Bella-logo Gelato.GIF

    Hotlanta delivered with a 90-degree day as we made our way to the sizzling little school we used to frequent only a few years ago. As always, the walls were slathered with fine work, the halls buzzed with laughter, Hank Richardson played tennis in a classroom, and students carted boxes of projects in various states of completion up and down the stairs. It was great to be back.

    As promised to our incredible audience, we’re posting the links to the many, many people we noted in our presentation who’ve inspired us recently, which also reads like a Best of UnBeige list. Here goes: Steve Delahoyde and the cool kids at Coudal, Dave Werner and his killer portfolio, UnBeige 2006 Crush Ze Frank, Stefan Bucher‘s Daily Monsters, proud parents (of Speak Up and other little things) Bryony Gomez-Palacio and Armin Vit, Materials and Applications, Treat Street (shhhh, don’t tell!), Jen Bekman and Hey, Hot Shot, Kate Bingaman and her Obsessive Consumption, the lovely Marian Bantjes, Sally Hogshead‘s Radical Careering, Debbie Millman and Design Matters (with Steven Heller today!), Eric Mahoney aka Samurai Love God, Dan Rollman‘s awesome t-shirts, Khoi Vinh‘s Subtraction, Nathan Davidson and his Unibrow, and Keith Scharwath, Aaron Rose and all of the Beautiful Losers.

    Thank you to the kind people at the Portfolio Center for having us back and of course, to Ciao Bella Gelato, our favorite gelato in the whole wide world.

    Print’s Party Was Packed, But Ours Had Craig Newmark

    MA_cover_TOC.jpg

    Although we were nearly deterred by the swamplike streets of Little Italy (don’t tell us to get over it, we’re from Los Angeles), many braved the overflowing gutters to check out Print’s New Visual Artists last Thursday night in NY. The roster of 20 very international artists–all under 30–and hundreds of their new best friends packed into the superskinny Groupe space on Elizabeth Street and toasted each other with two flavors of vodka–huckleberry (pretty good) or peach caffeinated (dangerous).

    Among the wet and well-dressed were Print editor Joyce Rutter Kaye looking glamorous in a blue silky top, Leif Parsons, looking tall, and bespectacled Debbie Millman (heading home to prep for her show with Barbara Kruger the next day). Print staffers Emily Gordon and Lindsay Ballant were both busy playing hostess. We congratulated 2007 inductee Kevin Smith and past honoree Rob Giampietro, who informed us that Rudy VanderLans was in town for a photo show at Park Avenue Armory.

    Print contributors Alice Twemlow and David Womack nodded their heads to the strains of almost-too-old school hip hop, although, really, how can you go wrong with “Cool It Now“? We gazed at Jane art director Jeff Glendenning‘s t-shirt but couldn’t quite place it until he told us he used to work at the NYT Magazine…oh yeah, that one. Afterwards we ducked around the corner for fresh-n-fruity drinks at Cafe Habana with Khoi Vinh, Aviva Michaelov and Brian Rea, and we were later joined by the delightfully-bookish Rodrigo Corral.

    It was much drier the next evening when we gathered around the koi ponds and cocaine-fabulous decor of Chinatown Brasserie (Seriously, mirrored club chairs? No.) for the mediabistro.com party, where more than a few mai tais were tossed back by familiar faces that included Adam Greenfield, Liz Danzico, Rachel Abrams, Sam Potts and Louise Ma (later we collected Allan Chochinov and Emma Presler). Man-of-the-hour was a toss up between a jovial Craig Newmark (of List fame) or Jesse Kirshbaum, who is now the proud owner of the first-ever UnBeige shirt. Even though he had absolutely no idea what we wrote about.

    The Shiner Bock Party Report II

    black_magnolia_cafe_sm.gif

    It was starting to sprinkle again as we embarked on our final SXSW party circuit, stopping next at the Gawker/Lifehacker/Deadspin party (that combination sounds almost dangerous, doesn’t it?). The Side Bar was packed to discomfort, but we secured a spot outside where other people’s Budweiser wouldn’t be trickling down our arms.

    Khoi Vinh and Michael Lopp checked in with rave reviews after their 20×2 performances where people like Amanda Congdon and Murderball’s Mark Zupan got 2 minutes to answer questions starting “What if…?” We finally, finally connected with Core77 founder Stuart Constantine and traded design conference war stories. We forgot to give a shout out to the folks from outside.in (UnBeige readers!). We feel like we’re almost part of the New York Times.com Design Boys Club even though we secretly hated them for getting a room at the tres posh San Jose.

    After hearing of Good’s bad behavor, we opted for the SXNW party instead, where at about 2am we reached another milestone of our Austin eating experience. Magnolia Cafe, where the neon proclaims, high above Congress Street, “Sorry, we’re open.” We certainly weren’t.

    Getting Soaked At SXSW

    centraltexasrain.jpg

    After our Frank moment, we splashed across the street to carouse with our interactive cohorts in a reunion of sorts. We slugged Stellas and watched drenched co-eds come in from the rain with Khoi Vinh (Mr. Subtraction) and Jim Coudal (aka Steve’s Day Job Daddy), who had just dined with Helvetica director Gary Hustwit. Metropolis/Wired editor Andrew Blum and Daylife’s Liz Danzico bailed early after their panel-participating duties. John Gruber gave wistful advice for Microsoft and extolled the wonders of emollients. Media Temple‘s Chris Leu and Apple‘s Michael Lopp bought the drinks (thanks…and, we’ll see you guys again tonight, right?).

    Chris Fahey showed up later with an extra-long umbrella which we stared at enviously as the gutters began to overflow. After waiting 30-plus minutes for the rain to let up so we could walk the three blocks home, we gave up and hailed a cab. Best $2.00 we’ve ever spent.