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Posts Tagged ‘magazines’

Lucky‘s Brandon Holley Talks Photoshop and Fashion

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In the final segment of our Media Beat interview with Lucky editor-in-chief Brandon Holley, the print vet talked about the explosion of street style, where women can find designer goods (or versions of them) for cheap, and that hot-button issue every magazine editor grapples with: Photoshop.

Sure, a petition against Seventeen has the pub pledging to feature more “healthy, real women,” but is it even possible for a magazine to succeed without airbrushing its models? Uh, no, said Holley.

“I’ve done a bunch of focus groups, and women will constantly say, ‘Why don’t you just put a real person on the cover? I don’t wanna see a celebrity.’ That cover would sell 10 copies,” said Holley. “So, what women say they want and what they want are two different things sometimes. I mean, we do need to show more women with real bodies, absolutely. But I don’t think that should be a dead set rule.”

Part 1: Lucky EIC Brandon Holley on Getting a Magazine Job
Part 2: Brandon Holley Calls Fashion Blogging ‘Most Exciting Thing to Happen in Publishing in Decades’

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Freelance Photographers Wanted at Time Out Chicago

As the go-to guide for seven-day snapshots of local arts and events listings, Time Out Chicago boasts service-oriented stories that help urban explorers find the best ways to spend their free time.

And if you’re a freelance photographer, TimeOutChicago.com is wide open for those looking to add to their portfolios. The site gets over 3 million page views a month and features lots of photo galleries that speak to the mag’s cultural core.

“We have the broadest, most in-depth cultural coverage of Chicago of any media outlet and the largest cultural reporting team in the city, so if it’s about Chicago culture, we’d like to hear about it,” said editor-in-chief Frank Sennett. “Our target readership is anybody who actively consumes culture in the city of Chicago, people who are going out and doing things. They tend to be people in the city, but it could be anybody who wants to go out and do something fun.”

For editor contacts and more details on breaking in, read How To Pitch: Time Out Chicago.

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This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

The Atlantic Gives a Very Atlantic Explanation For Its Redesign

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There’s one thing gets us UnBeigers fired up, and that’s a rip-roarin’ magazine redesign. But try as we might, we just can’t wrap our heads around a magazine like the Atlantic getting a new look. They, however, have gathered some choice polysyllabic words in “Some Words About the Design” which describes their move from “too humble” to, well, tables:

The design of The Atlantic has always been so self-effacing, so quietly subordinate to the magazine’s stories, essays, and poems, that it seems somehow out of keeping to draw your attention to the redesign in your hands.

Go on, go on!

The logo and the basic geometry of the cover remain the same. It is inside the magazine that you will notice changes, some of them subtle, others more striking. Among the latter, the most obvious is the introduction of illustrated tables of contents–yes, that’s tables, plural.

Tables! Plural?!

Unfortunately you have to be a subscriber to read the rest of this compelling description, and, to see these fabled tables. Much more interesting is Michael Kelly‘s story about the history of the magazine’s design, prompted by their last redesign in February of 2001.

A Peek Inside Cabinet

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Cabinet‘s one of those magazines which truly lives up to its name: Every time we open it, our curiosity is rewarded with oddities, keepsakes, treasures, and delightfully well-written junk. This tomato treatise, for example, was so compelling it just sent us into the kitchen craving some wayward ruby fruits.

Paul Laster conducts this interview with editor Sina Najafi about what makes Cabinet, and, more importantly, what makes Cabinet different.