Liquid Treat AgencySpy AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote TVSpy TVNewser PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC 10,000 Words GalleyCat MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Paula Scher’

Live From the Shake Shack, It Might Be Michael Bierut

shackin.jpg

It’s time to pull up a chair and gather ’round the computer for a little Must See TV, as we spy on those lucky enough to get a proper invitation to Michael Bierut‘s book release party at the legendary Shake Shack. We are now going live to the Shack Cam to get a glimpse of the design stars in attendance.

According to the “Shacksomphere”, it’s a balmy 90 degrees in Madison Square Park, with winds out of the south at 15 mph, but the resolution on the Shack Cam is little blurrier than we’d expec–oh my god, there’s Paula Scher! Oh, that’s just some girl eating a burger. Anyway, it sounds like it’s gonna be one heck of a–dude, I swear I see Michael Bierut! Oh, nope, that’s a chick. But that is totally Abbott Miller! No, wait, that’s some guy digging in the trash can.

Project M Gets on the Bus

bus5.jpgbus4.jpg

On a field trip to Selma with Greensboro, Alabama-based Project M (no, we didn’t walk from Montgomery, we drove), we were tipped to a cultural destination just over the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Artist unknown, but it’s a little bit Paula Scher and a little bit Howard Finster. And once we started taking it in, we realized we were a bit frightened, and it was probably preferable that the artist remain anonymous.

bus1.jpg
bus2.jpg
bus3.jpg
bus6.jpg

Between Vehemently Disagreeing and Playing Devil’s Advocate

scherblogs.jpg

Where, o where, o where did Paula Scher find the inspiration for today’s op-ed in the New York Times?

Vocabulary assistance here (we didn’t know what it meant, either).

Today, Time For Something New

TOC_Briefing_Sm.jpg

Today’s the day that Time goes public with their new look, and we must say although we liked the cover we saw yesterday, we’re way thrilled with the inside of the mag. The stodge is gone. Yet the designers still managed to invoke plenty of the mag’s visual history, says Paula Scher:

“We created a system that we thought would resonate with today’s readers. It’s full of quick bits and relevant info, but still retains the spirit of TIME. We used the display typeface Franklin Gothic that was part of the history of the magazine, and revisited the grid used by Walter Bernard,” the legendary editorial designer.

As you’ll remember, this was one of Luke Hayman‘s first duties at Pentagram, along with Scher. Read more at Pentagram’s blog.

Helvetica World Premiere

sm.jetset1.jpg

We just barely snagged a seat in an extremely tightly-kerned crowd at the world premiere of Helvetica here at SXSW, where the entire audience sported buttons reading “I love/hate Helvetica.” Okay, okay, everybody has been making their little jokes about “the movie about a font.” But guess what–this is not really a movie about a typeface. Helvetica is just a character in this wonderfully-made film, which just might be the best history of graphic design we’ve ever seen.

Director Gary Hustwit‘s film will lead even the most design clueless through an intelligent global survey of design. But designers won’t be bored. It’s not a simplified primer; instead, it’s the soul of graphic design–straight from the source. Massimo Vignelli preaching that there are only really, three typefaces (we thought it was five; he must be getting pickier). Sagmeister saying clean type is boring. Paula Scher explaining illustrative type. Rick Poynor explaining Modernism. David Carson epitomizing grunge type. Experimental Jetset bringing it all back around.

The story of graphic design is meant for the big screen. With the exception of a few conferences and maybe the work of someone like Hillman Curtis, we just don’t get to see ourselves like this. And damn do we look good.

Especially Erik Spiekermann, and an adorable Michael Bierut, who are the real stars of this film. Bierut delivers the best monologue in the whole movie–an awesome treatise on corporate design that got the biggest laughs and a hearty round of applause.

True to subject, the film itself is simple and beautiful. There are some lovely animations of Swiss designs and cool shots of how type gets made. And there’s an exuberant quality about the whole thing–a lingering shot on a corner of a poster, the spare but expressive music, and the stunning, overwhelming ubiquitousness of this typeface that means nothing and everything, all at the same time. The film festival guy who introduced the film said this, and got a laugh from the audience, but by the end of the film it was apparent: Designer or not, you will never, ever see the world the same again.

Citi Takes On New Identity, Forgets Who Created It In the First Place

citilogo.gif

It’s pretty funny, isn’t it? An entire article about how Citibank’s using its new Citi logo for all its branding without a single credit for the person who designed the darn thing.

The Best Magazine Redesign Joke That Nobody Got

designtime.jpg

Maybe that skinny WSJ set off a trend? It seems everyone wants to get the real story about their redesigns off their chests recently. The New York Observer chats with Richard Stengel, managing editor of Time, about its impending transformation headed by Luke Hayman (although there’s no mention of Paula Scher‘s involvement, which we swore was confirmed). The point of the article is that the change will be gradual…coming in increments…no solid date…weeks or months, who knows…nothing set yet…which makes us want to scream at the writer, dude, leave Mr. Hayman alone and let him go back to work! But then Hayman gives the best quote ever, which we see as a brilliant Rumsfeldian kiss-off:

“There will be a significant change at one time, but it is also going to evolve over time,” Mr. Hayman said.

See, what he’s saying is…it’s only a matter of Time.

<< PREVIOUS PAGE