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Posts Tagged ‘Petrula Vrontikis’

“Design Matters” Season Five Schedule Announced

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Effervescent host (and quite the hostess as well) Debbie Millman has leaked the new season of “Design Matters” to UnBeige first, kicking off January 18 with our Man of the Year, Chip Kidd. Graphic designers, writers, illustrators, authors, scientists, editors, a Nobel Prize winner and many, many UnBeige favorites will be featured on the show, which, incidentally, was voted a “favorite podcast” on PSFK’s IF Marketing Podcast survey. Tune in every Friday at 3pm to hear these fine voices:

January 18: Chip Kidd
January 25: Eric Kandel
February 1: Kurt Andersen
February 8: Vaughan Oliver
February 15: Jonah Lehrer
February 22: Petrula Vrontikis
February 29: Stefan Bucher
March 7: Laurie Rosenwald
March 14: Jeffrey Zeldman
March 28: Abbott Miller
April 11: Robynne Raye
April 18: All Music Show with DJ and Designer Michael Hodgson
April 25: Lawrence Weiner

Full bios for each guest can be found below.

Read more

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Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

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STEP 100 Deadline Extended

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An emission from the mothership informs us you’ve got until October 15 to submit work for STEP Inside Design’s STEP 100, which they tell us is the only design competition that interviews all 100 winners. They’ll also put up all the finalists on the website and let people vote for the Readers’ Choice award, which last year went to six pieces you can see online.

So you can get a head start on mailing those care packages filled with pricey wine and rare cheeses, the judges are: Lemon fresh Kevin Grady, Grady & Metcalf, Chicago and Boston; Dancin’ fool Bill Grant, Grant Design Collaborative, Canton, Ga.; Nice Midwestern boy Jamie Koval, VSA Partners, Chicago; Petrula “Little Thunder” Vrontikis, Vrontikis Design Office, Los Angeles; and barn owner Ann Willoughby, Willoughby Design, Kansas City.

Everything else you need to know can be found right here.

Core77 Sows Creative Seeds

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Core77′s Coroflot site has launched Creative Seeds, a new blog all about giving creatives the tools they need to succeed. In addition to featuring portfolios from the Coroflot community, they’ve launched with a really interesting piece by Petrula Vrontikis about how creatives take credit for the work of a team. We also like a cool feature named “What do you look for in a designer?” where they ask top peeps like Paul Budnitz and Sagmeister what they look for when hiring juniors.

UnBeige Editor to Poison Minds at Art Center

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You would have thought word of our incendiary propaganda campaign would have reached the West Coast by now, but apparently this is not the case, since the lovely folk at Art Center have enlisted our public speaking services for next week.

“Worth 1000 Words: Writing About Design,” will take place Wednesday, June 27 at 7:30pm in that funky black building perched high above Pasadena, California. Petrula Vrontikis will moderate, and joining us is STEP editor Tom Biederbeck (for the second time that week) and Schools of Thoughts crowdpleaser Peter Lunenfeld, Professor, Media Design Program and Editorial Director, MIT Mediawork Series. And this lucky UnBeige editor has to follow that. We’re already sweatin’ bullets.

This event is free and open to the public, no RSVP required. It will be held at Art Center’s Los Angeles Times Media Center and in case you don’t know, here’s how to get there.

Y Did It Have to End So Soon?

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Sure, we made it home safe, but we’re not happy about it. We wish the Y Conference in San Diego could have lasted a whole week. Now we’ve heaped praise upon these stars to the south before, and it’s not really news that this little regional conference is no longer little or regional. What Y is, however, is small enough for even the lowliest student to hobnob with the biggest of big-time speakers. The conference fee is relatively cheap. And we don’t think we have to mention the beyond-perfect climate (72 and sunny; okay, make that very sunny).

As we smooched old friends goodbye at the Red Circle Cafe Saturday night, realized that were it not for Y regulars Stefan Bucher and Petrula Vrontikis, we’d have never known about the wonder of Y. We thanked Terry “Stampy” McCaffrey for changing the way we think about those little perforated stickers. And we praised conference chair Adam Rowe, who has been doing this for an incredible seven years, although we’d like to offer one popular thought to mull over for the next year: 12 white guys and only two women?

On our way out we were busy describing the plot of Idiocracy to Tucker Viemeister when his eyes drifted towards the ceiling. “It’s a shame we can’t get these guys some lightbulbs,” he said, as we followed his gaze to two burnt-out lights over the bar. Ah, the curse of the man who can do everything. Next to him was Mirko Ilic, forever cursed as the only man confident (European? crazy?) enough to take his shirt completely off while sunbathing in the lawn of the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice. We may have missed hearing Ilic speak, but it didn’t matter; he was pretty much presenting all weekend.

Finally, we got totally busted by our newest best friend Stefan Sagmeister who promised to bore us again and again with his deja vu-inducing presentation. We turned bright red and said that we didn’t think everyone felt that way, it was just that we happened to be at every single conference. “But so am I!” he laughed. Man, that Stefan Sagmeister is downright impossible not to look up to–and not just because he’s like seven feet tall.

So if Y was the question, what was the answer, you ask? Probably the most important thing we learned that when you Ask a Ninja (and believe us, we did), the answer is most likely going to be “Thomas Kinkade.” See you next year.

More Y Conference coverage.

Back to School With Peter Turchi

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Class was in session tonight for the third Schools of Thoughts conference, which has a special little place in our hearts–Schools of Thoughts 2 was the very first design conference we ever covered, back when we felt so overwhelmed about knowing everything there is to know about design that we bought all the speakers’ books in the conference bookstore.

Co-organized by Louise Sandhaus, Petrula Vrontikis and Denise Gonzales-Crisp (who was present in spirit, but in Prague), the conference opened with a keynote speaker who was quite honestly a home run. Peter Turchi wrote the awesome book Maps of the Imagination and was given the job of focusing a room of design educators on the task of “mapping the future of graphic design.”

You know how it goes with the non-designer speakers who sometimes speak to designers; sometimes they just pepper their talk with “key phrases” and desert the audience a few minutes in. Not the case with Turchi–he had us at this statement, which seemed to say everything about both design today and the role of an educator: “Even to be lost is to be somewhere,” he said. “Especially as artists, we want to get lost to be able to discover places that were never there before.”

Five Freelance Facts From Petrula Vrontikis

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She’s a stately golden-throated Greek goddess, but Petrula Vrontikis is also one heck of a savvy businesswoman. In her session Freelancing 101 at the HOW Conference, Vrontikis (“little thunder” in Greek) outlined some basic and not-so-basic tips for the often scary world of freelancing. Five that caught our ears:

1. Negotiate both your rate and your terms. Sure, you’ll spend hours making sure your bid is right, but you should also work out what percentage of money you’ll get up front, after 30 days, etc.

2. If you think a project will require you to change your original bid or rate, tell your client right away. Don’t ever wait until it’s finished to ask for more.

3. If you have a specialized skill, charge more. If you can demonstrate that you’ve got exceptional experience or a technical talent in a specific area, don’t be afraid to raise your rate.

4. You must function as a businessperson, even if you feel like an artist. Forget your ego, your talent, your portfolio. You’re the owner of a small business and you have to do what’s best for that business.

5. Just call people back. A huge, huge advantage for any freelancer is that you have the time and resources to give exceptionally personal attention to your clients. Stay in touch.

Vrontikis seems to draw from this vast reservoir of cool, and once we found out she studies and teaches yoga, it became obvious that this woman is totally in control–spiritually and enterpreneurially (hope that’s a word). Read the awesome story about why her firm’s website address is 35k.com.