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Posts Tagged ‘Zaha Hadid’

Quote of Note | Zaha Hadid


(Courtesy Zaha Hadid Architects)

“I just think that at this stage, all form of travel should be slightly more advanced. The adverts should be nicer, the way you get to [airports] should be better, the way you check in, the people should be–well, they can’t change people, but, you know, they should wear better uniforms, they should give you better food, everything. I mean, you know, tragic, a salad on British Airways, it’s a killer. I don’t know where they found this petrified green…forgetting about the service, every time I take a British Airways flight, I lose my luggage.”

-Zaha Hadid in an interview with Fortune‘s Stephanie Mehta on Monday in London at the magazine’s Most Powerful Women conference.

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Zaha Hadid’s Riverside Museum Named European Museum of the Year


(Photo: Alan McAteer)

Visitors can arrive at Riverside Museum in Glasgow by foot, bicycle, bus, subway, train, ferry, or car. The variety of options is fitting for Scotland’s “Museum of Transport and Travel,” which opened the doors to its new home, designed by Zaha Hadid, in June 2011. The museum bested a field of 40 museums from 21 countries to take the title of 2013 European Museum of the Year, an honor presented last month in Belgium. Judging for the 36-year-old award is based on “public quality,” the extent to which a museum satisfies the needs and wishes of its visitors.

The jagged outline of the Riverside Museum “enscapsulates a wave or pleat, flowing from city to waterfront, symbolizing the dynamic relationship between Glasgow and the shipbuilding, seafaring, and industrial legacy of the river Clyde,” according to Hadid. Views through the building’s clear glass facades reveal one of its most memorable features: pistachio-hued walls. Chosen by Hadid in consultation with the exhibition designers, the color makes for a warm yet striking backdrop for displays that range from a wall of automobiles and a ceiling-mounted swirl of bikes to exhibits about long-sunken paddle steamers and glam tramcars from the 1930s.

Rem Koolhaas Wins Johannes Vermeer Award, Zaha Hadid Honored by Veuve Clicquot


(Photos from left: Fred Ernst and courtesy Veuve Clicquot)

April is not the cruellest month when you’ve got a Pritzker and projects in progress on most continents. It’s just one more month to collect commissions, continue the epic battle against jetlag, and receive awards. Two recent honors of note: Rem Koolhaas is this year’s recipient of the Dutch state prize for the arts, the Johannes Vermeer Award, while Zaha Hadid has been declared the the winner of the 41st Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award, an honor that we hope comes with a lifetime supply of bubbly.

Koolhaas will receive the Johannes Vermeer Award, a €100,000 prize that is mainly to be used for the realization of a special project, at an October 21 ceremony at the recently reopened Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. Past winners of the award, established in 2008 to honor artists working in the Netherlands and across all disciplines, include photographer Erwin Olaf and artist Marlene Dumas.
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T+L Design Awards Honor the New Museum and Geishas With Smeared Makeup

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No real surprises in the Travel + Leisure design awards, judged by Agnes Gund, John Hoke, Richard Lambertson, Renee Price, Hani Rashid, David Rockwell and Yeohlee Teng, and moderated by Chee Pearlman. The New Museum aces yet another critical review, with a nod for best museum. The Nam Hai in Vietnam gets best resort, and the Ritz-Carlton Beijing, Financial Street is best hotel. The troubled National Stadium, Beijing wins for for public space and Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle gets a well-deserved nod for cultural space. Zaha Hadid‘s cable car stations in Innsbruck get best transportation. Design Champion is Amanda Burden, commissioner of City Planning for NYC. Something called the iPhone gets best travel gadget.

But there is one surprise, at least to us: Philippe Starck‘s Katsuya Hollywood as best restaurant. Not that it’s not nice-looking in a knives suspended in Lucite kind of way, but it’s simply the second location in a chain (the original location’s in Brentwood, many more are planned). Plus, the design makes it a bit difficult to actually eat there. Most of the chairs are un-sit-able (T+L calls them ‘simple,’ they obviously didn’t subject their rears to them) and the ambiance isn’t exactly appetizing, as the arty shot above from our pals at Eater LA will illustrate. The good news is that the blood-red lipstick dripping all over the place helps to remind you to order your Kobe beef rare.

Seven Questions for Cathy Leff

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As the UnBeige snowbirds migrate south into the Miami cacophony of art and design this week, we’ll be looking to local museum The Wolfsonian – Florida International University to be our home away from home. This oasis of design in the heart of South Beach has become a formidable institution and research center on the international stage, mostly due to the tireless leadership of one Cathy Leff, who has served as the museum’s director since 1998. Leff stepped away from her 18-hour workdays dusting off the collection in anticipation of Art Basel and wrapping chocolate bars on behalf of Stefan Sagmeister to answer our questions:

1. What’s the first thing(s) you read in the morning?
Email, then New York Times–for the national/ global view–and Miami Herald for the local picture.

2. Last book you read?
What Orwell Didn’t Know: Propaganda and the New Face of American Politics.

3. Best/most memorable design/designer-related encounter?
Hosting Zaha Hadid as a guest speaker for The Wolfsonian-Florida International University and accompanying her with then-NY Times architecture critic Herbert Muschamp to see the space where she would deliver her lecture. I had tried very hard to locate a venue that would excite Zaha as opposed to the typical anonymous auditorium. I was so excited when the Fontainebleau Hotel agreed to let us use the Bam-Bam Room, one of the only rooms–well, cabaret theater–that was still in its original Morris Lapidus-designed condition (though a bit run down). When Zaha saw the red and blue lights and this over-the top cabaret theater, I think Zaha freaked out, saying she could not give a lecture in that space, but Herbert came to the rescue and calmed her down when he reminded her that she invented bling and this was the perfect venue in which to deliver a lecture.

4. How would you describe Miami’s design scene?
HOT and getting hotter–from high to low–and there’s certainly a growing audience that both appreciates and consumes design. I think there has been a lot going on in Miami for many years–it’s all been cumulative–from the work of Judith Arango and the Kassamalis, to the schools of architecture–to what we, The Wolfsonian, aim to do: promote the study and appreciate of how design affects human behavior.

5. Why is this Art Basel Miami/Design Miami thing such a big deal?
Because it brings together during a few-day period a critical mass–approximately 100,000–of international designers, institutions (museums), design manufacturers, press, luxury brand promoters, cultural consumers, dealers, and artists. And that encounter is quite spectacular.

6. This holiday season, I’m giving…
…my friends and family a break from the silly gifts, and I will make a donation in their honor to the Sundari Foundation, which provides shelter to homeless women in Miami, some of whom have infants.

7. This holiday season, I’m hoping to get…
…a holiday. I am heading off with friends for two weeks in Japan (Tokyo and Kyoto) and southeast China, ending it all with five days in Beijing.

Herbert Muschamp Dies at 59

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We were hearing a few reports that design writer and former architecture critic for the New York Times Herbert Muschamp died last night, and the paper has just posted an obit by Nicolai Ouroussoff:

As the architecture critic for The Times from 1992 to 2004, Mr. Muschamp seized on a moment when the repetitive battles between Modernists and Post-Modernists had given way to a surge of exuberance that put architecture back in the public spotlight. His openness to new talent was reflected in the architects he championed, from Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Zaha Hadid and Jean Nouvel, now major figures on the world stage, to younger architects like Greg Lynn, Lindy Roy and Jesse Reiser and Nanako Umemoto.

Thanks to our new all-access passes to the NYT archives, you can curate your own Muschamp tribute from his hundreds, maybe thousands of articles.

Lautner, Kappe & Koenig Headed to the Getty

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The files of John Lautner, Ray Kappe and Pierre Koenig are going to a temperature-controlled home at the Getty, according to Janet Eastman‘s article in the LA Times.

This beefs up the Getty’s architectural collection considerably since it lagged behind other cultural institutions until a little gift from Julius Shulman gave it some serious clout:

The centerpiece of the Getty’s Modernist collection arrived in 2005: photographer Julius Shulman’s archive consisting of 260,000 contact prints, negatives, transparencies and other images of more than 7,000 projects by Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, Schindler, Charles Eames, Koenig and Lautner.

“Once Shulman arrived, people contacted us and we contacted them,” says De Wit.

Eastman also points out how tricky it is to get other architects to donate their works to posterity:

Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas turned down $1.3 million last year from the Netherlands Architecture Institute to wait for a better offer. And star architects such as Zaha Hadid have sold individual drawings on the art market as if they were by David Hockney.

Because it wouldn’t be the weekend without one final pick-on-the-starchitect-fest by the LA Times.

Christopher Hawthorne Wishes He Could Find Some Green Designers to Write About For Once

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With Philip Nobel lighting the way for architecture critics to speak their tainted little minds, critics everywhere are now making pointed attempts at abrasiveness. But sometimes it just doesn’t fly. When Christopher Hawthorne at the LA Times finally makes it out to NY to review the “Design for the Other 90%” show, he tries to make some kind of point about the lack of green designers. We only have to wonder…what on earth is he talking about?

Rem Koolhaas has offered what seems like a dozen explanations–some of them rather convincing, actually–for his willingness to take commissions from the Tibet-paving, coal-belching Chinese government. Peter Eisenman has long been happy to play the charming villain for the green crowd. Zaha Hadid‘s buildings show a mesmerizing disdain for the idea that she bears responsibility for anything beyond the health of her own legacy.

Horrible use of the starchitect card. Ho hum. Nothing new there. Try again.

Among the green generation, who is heading up the charge? Well, nobody, really. This may be the first movement in architectural history whose followers are more famous than its leaders. Brad Pitt, Leonardo DiCaprio and Orlando Bloom are well-known fans of green design. Among green designers, on the other hand, we have the ambitiously principled (read: sorta vanilla) Cameron Sinclair, who leads Architecture for Humanity; the great, greatly mustachioed and soft-spoken Shigeru Ban; and William McDonough, who is beginning to project an Andy Rooney vibe.

Although we can’t disagree with either the vanillaness of Sinclair or the Rooneyness of McDonough (or the greatness of Ban), we have to say it’s clinically insane to say that there’s a dearth of well-known green designers. Really? Leo and Brad are the greenest architects you could find?

Hawthorne, what are you smoking? We bet that’s green.

Linda Tischler Does Dubai, Zaha Doesn’t

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Fast Company writer Linda Tischler writes to tell us she’s now seen it all–she’s just returned from the International Design Forum in Dubai and if she can sum the Dubai experience up in one word, it’s “whoa.”

Tischler talks real estate including a pretty awesome description of Dubai’s unique urban fabric. And, as a woman after our own heart, she dishes on who made an appearance at the conference: Paola Antonelli, Marcel Wanders, Oliviero Toscani, Karim Rashid (DJing, per usual). And, more importantly, who didn’t:

International superstar architect Zaha Hadid, who actually managed to make it onto the final, printed program, was AWOL nonetheless. Her participation on these things has evidently become running joke–Zaha, the International No-Show–in design circles. At a dinner in New York during ICFF, Tony Chambers, editor of Wallpaper, estimated that she appears approximately twice for every 10 commitments she makes. If you’re planning on attending a conference because she’s scheduled to appear, buy trip insurance first.