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blogging

Journalist-Made Liveblog Pro Connects Real-Time Blogging and Twitter

Screen Shot 2014-01-06 at 9.26.36 PMWe talk often about reporting news in real time on this blog. Live-tweeting, live-blogging, live-streaming — the whole shebang. We’ve talked about ScribbleLive and CoverItLive as options for breaking things quickly via a live blog to your readers. But don’t forget about Liveblog Pro.

The UK-based company launched in beta about a year ago, but I didn’t hear about it until Digital First Media’s Digital Transformation Editor Steve Buttry mentioned it in passing during a post about the pros and cons of live-tweeting versus live-blogging Monday, the topic of which several industry professionals passionately discussed via Twitter recently (spoiler alert: Buttry says they’re both vital; neither is superior).

Anyway, using the Liveblog Pro software doesn’t require any knowledge of code and was created specifically for journalists. In a nutshell, Liveblog Pro ”allows publishers to cover a wide range of content — from events, to developing news stories, to Q&A sessions.” It was even used by Columbia Journalism Review on election night in 2012.

Now, for the part you really care about: what does it offer, and what does it cost?

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NY Post Reporter on How to Create a Successful Blog: ‘Consistency’

JozenCummings

Jozen Cummings likes to call himself a professional ‘date-maker’ and that’s an accurate description for his career as of late. Cummings is the dating reporter for the New York Post‘s Meet Market column, and he runs the blog ‘Until I Get Married,’ where he shares the ups and downs of bachelorhood.

Cummings, whose writing has appeared everywhere from Essence to The New York Times Magazine, had no dating-related clips to show for himself when he initially went in for the interview at the Post. But he did have his personal blog on the topic, which helped him land the gig.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Cummings talks about setting up blind dates, his writing process and how to cultivate a following on your blog:

Now that you’ve been kind of accidentally intentional with your blog’s success, what advice would you give up-and-coming bloggers to optimize their blog’s popularity? 

I think the most important thing is to find a schedule and be as consistent as possible with it because that’s the thing that people need in order to engage — consistency. It’s more important that you publish your post on the same day every week than it is for you to write five different times five days a week. Do it once a week for four weeks at the same time and then the fifth week, have a post ready, but don’t post. Give it a day. And I guarantee there will be somebody who you didn’t know was reading who will hit you up and say, “Yo, where’s my post?”

For more advice and what it’s like to be a dating reporter, read: So What Do You Do, Jozen Cummings, Blogger And Dating Columnist For The New York Post?

– Aneya Fernando

How Should Journalists Be Paid in The Digital Age?

broke-journalist

Journalism is in a state of flux. Traditional newspapers are in decline, Millennial-centric sites like BuzzFeed are actually making a profit and sponsored content is now the norm.

Writer compensation is constantly evolving, too. What’s a fair salary for a digital journalist these days? There are plenty of payment methods out there. Gawker famously tried the pay-per-pageview model. Writers went overboard with galleries and articles on celebrity sex scandals, and realizing that pageviews were too easy to inflate, the experiment ultimately ended. They now base their goals on unique visitors attracted. Other sites, like Complex, pay their writers based on overall percentage of company revenue, among other metrics.

10,000 Words recently spoke (via email) to Coates Batemanthe executive director of digital programming strategy at Forbes Media, about the conundrum of how to pay digital journalists. The first thing Bateman told us was that Forbes has never used the pay-per-pageview model. What asked what he thought of this type of payment, he replied: ”We cannot speak for others. Our model is about individual experts building audiences and communities around their knowledge. That is why we choose to compensate based on unique visitors.”

The assumption that basic journalistic standards go out the window when clickability is king isn’t necessarily true, Bateman says. Read more

Does WaPo‘s “Know More” Blog Represent the New Journalism?

knowmoreThis week The Washington Post launched a blog that aims to wise you up and make it easier for you to share your new knowledge, too.

Know More” is a new Web space hosted by WaPo and maintained by the popular Wonkblog’s Ezra Klein and reporter Dylan Matthews with the expectation that a visually-strong display of both impactful and relatively inconsequential news could create a viral effect, especially on the social Web.

You’ve got two choices once you click on the image, graph or tweet that tickles your fancy: “No More” or “Know More.” If you do indeed want to learn more about that particular topic, you’re led to various sources on the Web (some WaPo, many others not) that provide deeper context for the tile that originally interested you.

There’s no rhyme or reason for the way these tiles are arranged. A Grumpy Cat blurb is next to a photo explaining the exorbitant costs of putting people in prisons, and a link leading to a song about Target sits above a fascinating graphic breaking down how a U.S. debt default would affect other countries, pensions, social security, etc. The key for Know More — Klein told Gigaom‘s Laura Hazard Owen — is that they’ve created a place where it’s easier to pluck one image or a single compelling quotation from an overarching story and use it as a lede or headline that wouldn’t work on a traditional news site. This way, the team at Know More can try to determine what it is that makes people want to learn more about a topic and then present that tidbit first.

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Introducing Columbia Visuals, A Viz Journalist’s New Best Friend

columbiaIf a picture is worth a thousand words, then a blog covering all aspects of photography is pretty much priceless.

At least that’s what the Digital Media department at Columbia Journalism School is aiming for with its new project, Columbia Visuals. This new blog is meant to give advice for all visual journalists an online home. Basically anything that affects your career as a photographer or videographer — everything from copyright information and inspiration for great storytelling to practical tips on how to cover high-stress events like protests, for example — is fair game for Columbia Visuals.

Yesterday I spoke with Abbey Adkison, the Digital Media Coordinator at the NYC-based, storied journalism school (where she is also an assistant adjunct professor) about the blog, which just had its official launch Sept. 16.

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