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25 Holiday Gifts for Journalists 2013

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The gift-giving season is finally upon us (or already over, if we’re talking Hannukah, and we’re really sorry about taking so long), and that means it’s time for the annual 10,000 Words Holiday Gift Guide, our favorite holiday tradition. Whether you need a stocking stuffer for a journo friend or are compiling your own list for the secret Santa in your life, we’ve got you covered.

If you can’t find anything here, check out our guides of Christmas past: 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, and 2008.  If you have a gift to add, share it in the comments or tweet us with your own #journogifts.

And herewith, our favorite things this year: Read more

How to Achieve These 3 New Year’s Resolutions For Journalists

Thinking ahead a month might seem like an eternity for many journalists in the thick of holiday stories and planning for vacations. But before you hang up your hat on 2013, you should make a plan for how you’ll do better in 2014.

journalismresolutionsWant to be a better journalist? Here are three professional New Year’s resolutions you can make — and keep — for next year, and how to do it.

1. Learn something new

Yeah yeah, this is sort of what journalists do every day for their research. But when was the last time you sat down and took a class, attended a professional conference or just read a book related to your craft? In a world that’s constantly demanding new skills, you’ll soon be irrelevant if you don’t keep up on the trade. Here’s a few ideas on how to do it: Read more

Pizza and Election Night: Some Things Just Go Together

pizza election nightIt’s election night and everyone knows election night is nothing without pizza. What did your newsroom eat tonight? Read more

How to Handle Haters: Journalist Edition

We’ve all had to deal with them: I call ‘em haters.

Journalists indubitably have to face the (oftentimes) unjust and inaccurate criticisms of those who don’t like what we have reported and written. With the Web, our work is constantly under scrutiny, and anyone has the opportunity to comment on the story’s content, the reporter, and the reporter’s mother.

The “haters” vary — be it municipal public information officers, school board members, politicians or just a publication subscriber, if you haven’t ticked someone off enough to receive a nasty letter or angry phone call the morning of publication, (despite your unbiased, factual and carefully edited reporting, of course), you’re probably not doing it right.

Read more

The ‘Circus’ of Fashion Journalism and Niche Media

Whether or not you live in New York City, you are bound to be bombarded with fashion on some homepage this week, as #NYFW kicks off a month-long season of shows.

Like in general news publishing, the niche, elite world of fashion journalism has undergone some serious changes in the digital landscape. And it’s anxiety ridden. This past spring, Garage Magazine produced a short, 10 minute, video called “Take My Picture” anchored by the notorious fashion journo Tim Blanks. The piece examines the rise of the fashion blogger and “street style” photographers. It’s the same anxiety news hounds have about citizen journalists, but the elitism is ten fold. It’s fashion, after all.

Even the New York Times noted this week that the state of the fashion industry — which relies on fashion media as much as fabric — is reaching circus levels. Industry standards like Women’s Wear Daily, Harper’s Bazaar, W, and of course, Vogue are still kings of fashion content, but ‘good’ fashion blogs — the Andrew Sullivans, if you will — of fashion media, like Natalie Joos’ Tales of Endearment and Man Repeller are just as important sources for fashion news and features. But again, the idea of ‘good’ journalism is problematic.

Media commenter Jay Rosen wrote this month in CJR that journalism is defined by ‘awayness,’ as in “I was there, you weren’t, let me tell you about it.” In that sense, the Tumblr-fication of fashion media and street style is a good thing. The more the merrier. But it’s an interesting problem. In “Take My Picture,” Blanks seems to suggest that arming civilians with cameras and free blogging sites is bad for culture, in general. It cheapens the niche. It’s the same worry the general news publishing world has about Twitter and listicles.

I wonder what sports writers would feel about the locker rooms being opened up to just anyone? Or what political writers would say if the White House press briefings were open town halls that any blogger could walk into? 

 

Image via Mashable

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