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Archives: May 2012

Spain’s First-Ever Investigative, Data Journalism Master’s Program To Launch In Fall

The University Rey Juan Carlos of Madrid will launch Spain’s first-ever masters degree on investigative reporting, data journalism and visualization this fall, and Google will  provide six scholarships that pay 80 percent of recipients’ tuition.

The new program is organized by the journalism school of the media group Unidad Editorial and the University Rey Juan Carlos of Madrid. I caught up  via e-mail with two people involved with the program: Marcos García Rey, investigative reporter and ICIJ member who will coordinate the master’s,  and Mar Cabra, a module coordinator in charge of the data journalism aspect.

Here are the highlights from our Q&A, which is include below:

  • Data courses will teach students how to think about the paper trail, how to obtain data, and how to use statistics to draw basic conclusions
  • Data courses will include basic analysis tools like Excel, SQL and web scraping
  • Second semester will touch on how to choose the correct visualization to convey a story
  • Reporting classes will be more traditional in nature, though students will be posting to the web from day 1
  • They drew inspiration from IRE’s Eductaor’s Center, Columbia’s investigative program and personal experiences
    Read more

GO Far With The Right Travel Story

Writing query letters are painful — unless you know exactly what the editors want to read. Enter mediabistro’s How To Pitch series, where editors break down exactly what they’re looking for from word count to which sections are prime for pitching.

Jaime Lowe, executive editor of Airtran’s in-flight pub GO, says an email with links to one or two clips that show clearly why you should be given the assignment, based on your experience, will have her jumping at her desk. “I definitely think that writing one really tight paragraph that is incredibly gripping is the most important part. “It just has to catch attention,” she explained.

For details on which sections Lowe is looking to fill, read How To Pitch: GO.

ag_logo_medium.gif This article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Apply Now to be a New Media Fellow at The Atlantic

If you’re not only an expert at using Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook but can edit video with the best of them, you should take a look at The Atlantic‘s 2012-2013 social media/multimedia fellowship.

The ad was posted on The Atlantic‘s Tumblr on Friday. Unfortunately, it doesn’t include details on whether the gig is paid or not The post has been updated to say it’s a paid, year-long job based in Washington, D.C. This is a great opportunity to get some hands-on social media and video experience at a great publication.

In addition to emailing over a resume, the editors would also “love to see the following”:

  • Your Twitter / Tumblr / Vimeo / YouTube / etc. pages
  • Anything cool you’ve made recently
  • A video someone else made that you think is great
  • A blog that you think is awesome
  • A meme that you think is awesome
  • A GIF that you think is awesome

To apply, send your resume and a cover letter to video@theatlantic.com.

Meograph: New Tool For Four-Dimensional Storytelling

A yet-to-be-launched tool called Meograph promises to let you easily “create, playback and share beautiful stories in the context of when and where.” It’s a tool that’s still in pre-beta, but journalists and news organizations can get priority access for an invite.

Meograph released a demo of what the tool can do, using the fictional KVWM San Diego TV station as an example use case. Based on the examples, I wouldn’t yet call the resulting product “beautiful,” but the storytelling format is a compelling mishmash: timeline + audio + Google Maps + images + video+  hyperlinks (for adding more context and linking to stories).

Misha Leybovich, founder and CEO, told me this via email about Meograph:

Meograph helps automatically create, share, and watch interactive multimedia stories.  Our first product pairs Google Earth with a timeline and multimedia overlays to tell stories in context of where and when.
Authoring is structured into a few simple prompts on an intuitive interface.  Viewers get a new form of media that they can watch in 2 min or dig into for an hour.  Sharing is easy: the two most viral types of media are videos and infographics … Meograph is both.

I’m not quite convinced that there are many use cases where this exact mishmash of media is the most powerful way to tell a story, but if you have any ideas, let me know in the comments. If you’re interested in testing the tool for a news organization, email journalism@memograph.com.

 

The New Yorker to Tweet Entire Short Story

Long form writing has found all sorts of outlets in our digital world of tweeting and blogging. There are curators like Longform and Pocket, Kindle Singles for novellas and non-fiction exploration, and digital publishers like the Atavist and Byliner. Now, The New Yorker will tweet the entirety of Jennifer Egan’s latest short story—all 8,500 words of it.

The story, called “Black Box,” will be published in next Monday’s magazine. But starting tonight at 8 p.m., @NYerFiction will be tweeting the story every minute for an hour. This hour of story-tweeting will last 10 days, and was born out of the author’s inclination to explore serialized fiction. As Egan writes on The New Yorker’s Page Turner blog, “This is not a new idea, of course, but it’s a rich one—because of the intimacy of reaching people through their phones, and because of the odd poetry that can happen in a hundred and forty characters.” Read more

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