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Archives: November 2013

Push Notifications for Everyone: App.net Launches ‘Broadcast’

appnet alertsYou don’t have to make your own app or hire an editor to handle push notification headlines for it anymore. App.net, the social networking and micro-blogging site, launches a new service, Broadcast, today, allowing anyone — from the freelance blogger to web magazine mogul — to send out their own push notifications.

All you have to do is download the app, released today on both Android and iOS markets, set up your ‘broadcast channel,’ and publish your notification. On the consumer side, they’ll have to sign up, too. And subscribe to you. But CEO Dalton Caldwell doesn’t see it as a hassle: Read more

Veteran Journalists Introduce New “Wine Pairing” With Digital Wine Magazine

grapecollectiveThe stereotypes about a reporter’s love for all things caffeine, spirits and junk food are long-standing and often pretty accurate (if you don’t believe me, check out this journalist food pyramid).

But several big names in the industry have put their heads together to create a free online wine magazine called Grape Collective that they say combines exceptional journalism about wine as well as a seamless digital experience. The goal? That readers can more simply get their hands on the beverages they’ve just read about, or watched a video about, directly through Grape Collective’s website.

This is not just some amateur venture — rather, the man at the helm of Grape Collective, Christopher Barnes — was president of the New York Observer Media Group and the co-founder of the popular daily amNewYork.

Okay, so if there’s no paywall, bona fide advertisers or digital subscription packages, how is Grape Collective ever going to make it, you ask? That’s the innovation in their business model. By offering editorial content more suited to the “casual-but-curious” wine drinker, as they call it, instead of the wine connoisseur, they hope to be more appealing to the masses. And because they’re combining journalism and e-commerce, Grape Collective will support its efforts through beverage sales conducted directly through their site.

Read more

Journalists Who Tweet About Being Laid Off: Necessary or Just Awkward?

Bloomberg_News_logoWe’ve talked a lot on the blog about how Twitter for journalists can be a blessing and a curse.

It can be used for finding sources, breaking news and making connections regarding potential work — but for announcing you’ve been laid off?

Laurie Muchnick, who was the highly-respected books editor at Bloomberg up until Monday, tweeted this to her nearly 6,000 followers:

“Not sure how to put this so here goes: Bloomberg is cutting arts coverage, including books, so today was my last day there.”

Later in the day, the New York Times reported the employee cutbacks in the arts and sports departments, adding that Bloomberg plans to focus more on its finance and government beats instead.

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What It’s Like To Start A Digital Mag On Global Women’s Issues

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Magazines are going through quite a transition these days. While print newspapers are in a downward spiral, digital magazines are thriving.

And that’s exactly why now is an opportune moment to create a digital pub. At least that’s what Daria Solovieva and Ivy Ng are hoping. The Columbia Journalism School grads recently created Valerie, a “space to feature female writers, bloggers, photographers, bring you stories of inspiring women and feature economic, social and political issues impacting lives of women across the globe.”

10,000 Words recently spoke to Solovieva (via email) about the ups and downs of creating an online-only pub. She says that she and her partner never considered that Valerie would be a print mag.

“The idea was always for an online, global platform that reflects how young professional women are increasingly consuming news and also the topics they’re actually interested in,” Solovieva explained. “None of my own peers subscribe to print women’s magazines anymore because the bulk of their content is limited to fashion and entertainment, which is also available for free online.” Read more

‘For Journalism’ Wants to Help You Build News Apps, Learn to Code

photo-mainIn the spirit of the animated, multi-faceted debate going on about whether or not journalists should learn how to code, it seems like a good time to help introduce For Journalism, a startup seeking to offer data journalism and programming skills to the journalist of the future.

It’s safe to say which side of the fence For Journalism is on when it comes to the topic of how much technical knowledge writers and reporters should have — they say explicitly that we’re suffering from a “pipeline problem for people with data and programming skills for journalism.”

The project, spearheaded by Dave Stanton, a developer and Poynter technology fellow, provides journalists with curriculum on everything from Ruby on Rails (an open-source coding and programming resource) and Django, to creating meaningful pieces of data for accompanying journalistic work. Courses cost $20 and include an informational e-book, screencasts, code repositories and forums.

Read more

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