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Posts Tagged ‘audience’

CIR Reaches Out To New Audiences With ‘Redaction’ Campaign

CIR_LogoThe Center for Investigative Reporting has launched a re-branding campaign with advertising agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners.

The campaign includes a new logo, along with recent projects like ‘Reveal’,  a one-hour investigative show for public radio, a video game called Hairnet Hero, made to teach children and their families about healthy eating, and celebrated an Emmy win for their graphic novel video ‘Jennifer’s Room,’ for new approaches to journalism.

Not that what CIR does is anything new. They’ve been producing quality, investigative journalism for 36 years, and many outlets, such as CNN and other large organizations, use their research and stories on a regular basis. The problem was that the CIR didn’t feel like they were connecting with the public directly. And so, the campaign.

The pro-bono creative from GSP focuses on the idea of redaction, which is sort of what investigative journalism is all about; filling in the blanks.

Executive chairman, Phil Bronstein, told me over the phone that, “[the idea of] redaction  is something that resonates with people — you don’t have to explain redaction to people. People understand it, especially with things like Snowden and the NSA recently. These are things that are of interest to people, its not just us saying ‘you need to know.’ In the past few decades, there’s been this focus on telling people what to pay attention to, we want to make it easier for people to consume this stuff and understand it.” Read more

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Instagram, Like Other Social Media, a ‘Police Scanner’ for a Demographic

Instagrammed screenshot of a picture of SnapRecognizing a new tool at The Boston Globe is a gateway to worthwhile discussion on social media strategy: not everyone likes, has access to or uses the same digital thing. And that’s great for journalism.

Journalism.co.uk has a nice read on the wall-o-local-Instagram pics that the Globe is test-driving in its newsroom. Appropriately named “Snap,” the project is a result of a partnership with the MIT Media Lab, and it displays every local Instagram image on a big map of the area. Neat on its own (i.e., worthy of an Instagrammed pic of its own), and notably, it’s also being used for helping find sources for local stories.

There’s definite newsroom utility to display social media data like this on a map. You naturally are exposed to events, with pictorial evidence, that you may not have otherwise paid attention towards. And you can can pinpoint where that action is happening. That’s practical on a day-to-day basis, and particularly helpful during event like Hurricane Sandy, where much is going on and you’re looking to move your reporting fast. It’s clearly a useful tool (and if it isn’t yet clear, I’d certainty love to play with it.)

What I think is worth noting beyond the obvious ingenuity, however, was the main story that according to the article Chris Marstall, creative technologist at the Boston Globe, actually produced during Hurricane Sandy. After spending “about eight hours staring at Snap” during the storm, this piece says that Marstall didn’t know what story to pick up and write. “Eventually I figured out that the interesting story to tell was that everybody was staying home and getting drunk in their apartments, doing a lot of day drinking,” he said.

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