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Posts Tagged ‘How To Pitch’

What The Boston Globe Magazine Wants From Your Personal Essay

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After the past success of our four-part series on Personal Essay Markets, we decided to bring it back this month. We have updates on a variety of pubs, all eager for first-person narratives from talented freelancers.

In Part I of the series, editors from 15 different markets broke down the details on what writers need to do to score a byline in their pub. Here’s an example:

The Boston Globe Magazine – “Connections”
A Boston connection is not necessary, but essays for this column must offer a fresh perspective on a personal relationship, whether with a romantic partner, friend, family member or even an interesting exchange with a stranger.
Length: 650 words
Pay: $500
Assigning editor: Veronica Chao, VERONICA dot CHAO at GLOBE dot COM
Chao’s advice: ”Please submit a completed draft rather than a pitch. Anonymous or pseudonymous bylines are not permitted at The Globe, nor is changing the names of people mentioned in the essay. Anyone you write about significantly in the essay must approve of your writing about him/her. We respond to an essay we want to publish within a month; we don’t respond to essays we won’t pursue.”

To find out what other mags, including Elle, AARP The Magazine and EatingWell, want, read: Personal Essay Markets, Part I.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Write for Passport‘s Tech-Savvy Gay Travelers

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Passport magazine has been a resource for affluent LGBT travelers since its inception in 2001. In the past 13 years, the pub has experienced huge growth and can even claim the title of first gay magazine to launch an iPad edition.

The pub is 80 percent freelance written and editors say they need writers who can tap into the specific needs of its globetrotting audience. Passport is a great place for those who enjoy long-form writing, as articles can run up to 3,500 words. As for topics:

The hallmark of the mag — the feature well — is a playground for creative angles on all things travel, but the particular focus is destinations. One story in the August 2013 issue took readers on an editorial journey à la a 10-day road trip through Florida, detailing stop-throughs in major cities, swamplands and legendary gay retreats. Another explored life in Saba, the Dutch municipality in the Caribbean where gay marriage is legal and a small LGBT community thrives.

Also worth noting: stories submitted for print may very well end up online as well, so freelancers are encouraged to pitch ideas that include photos and videos just for a little added multimedia panache.

For more on the pub, including details on the proper etiquette when sending in your submission, read: How To Pitch: Passport.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Details.com is on the Hunt for Writers With a Stylish Sensibility

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Details.com isn’t just an extension of Details the print magazine, it’s solidly its own entirely. Admittedly, the site does share the mag’s editorial mission and its commitment to sophisticated style.

The men’s site, which is on the lookout for new freelancers, is unabashedly about the luxe life and focuses on topics such as fashion, grooming, health, fitness, celebrities, entertainment and more. The few topics that are off-limits to writers and editors may surprise you:

…There are a couple of subjects that are not covered on Details.com at all — namely, sports and politics. And scantily clad women. “They can be a great traffic driver for some sites, but we don’t really do that at Details,” [online director James Cury] says. “The idea comes from our editor-in-chief that we have a particular identity and a particular reader who’s coming to us for certain things. He can go to those other sources for those other needs, but we’re going to really try to own luxury lifestyle content.”

To hear about what kind of writing the site is looking for, as well as editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: Details.com.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Woman’s Day Pays up to $2 a Word for Straightforward, Feel-good Writing

womans-day-january-2014Woman’s Day knows that its readers (women ages 30 to 90) are incredibly busy, and they crave easily digestible advice on everything from cooking and home decor to health and money matters.

The editors are looking for writers with a straightforward tone and the ability to do their research before sending a pitch — reading back issues of the mag (at least the past 12 months) is invaluable. Knowing which section to pitch and what type of reader to cater to is also key:

A writer’s best entryway onto the pages of the mag is a front-of-book section called “Embrace the Day,” focused on community and giving to others. It’s a special place in the hearts of Woman’s Day readers. “We did a story six months ago about a woman who makes cakes for children with cancer. Another editor and I discussed it and she said, ‘do you want to put a call-out for people to give?’ The woman didn’t have a 501(c)(3), so I didn’t feel comfortable soliciting donations on her behalf. But it didn’t matter,” [executive editor Annemarie Conte] shares. “Our readers found her. One even wrote in and taped a $100 bill to her letter. Our readers are incredibly giving and want to find deserving places to give.”

To hear more about how to get published in this mag, including what not to pitch, read: How To Pitch: Woman’s Day.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Discover Is Looking For Multimedia Pitches

Discover

Discover magazine is on the hunt for freelancers. The monthly has recently undergone some transformations (relocating their headquarters, changing up their editorial staff) and are looking for pitches on technology, physics, chemistry and other sciences.

With 95 percent of the pub’s content generated by freelancers, editor-in-chief Stephen C. George says that he needs writers for several media platforms:

Discover seeks pitches for its website, especially for “The Crux” and “Visual Science” (stories on images and video). Editors are also looking for “great multimedia content that we can put online or in digital editions,” said George.

Furthermore, Discover recently made a foray into long-form, digital eBook singles. The series is called In Depth and stories are available as Kindle Singles. The editorial team had a goal of two long-form digitals for 2013 and “mission accomplished,” said George. As a result, “we are actively looking for longer-form stories,” he said. A bonus is that Discover shares a percentage of the sales of its Kindle Singles with its writers.

For editors’ contact info and more details on how to get published, read: How To Pitch: Discover.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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