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Posts Tagged ‘Internet’

Online Journalism in 1981 (VIDEO)

Above is one of my favorite videos about online journalism — a 1981 television report from KRON-TV in the San Francisco Bay Area. It shows how, through a special service, people were able to dial into servers and download the day’s newspaper.

How long does it take to download the newspaper? Well, over 2 hours (after all, the modems shown require the user to physically place a telephone handset on top of them).

It speaks of eight newspapers who had online versions available at the time: the Columbus Dispatch, The New York Times, the Virginian-Pilot & Ledger Star, The Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the San Francisco Examiner, the Los Angeles Times and the Minneapolis Star and Tribune. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Bloggers Are Not Journalists Rules Portland Judge

In the ongoing debate on journalist vs. blogger, a Portland judge’s recent ruling draws a clear distinction between the two. Crystal Cox, a self-identified investigative blogger, was sued by the investment firm Obsidian Finance Group for defamation. She wrote several articles that were highly critical of the firm’s co-founder Kevin Padrick, who told OregonLive.com “The damage to me is forever. The Internet is not capable of being undone.”

U.S. District Judge Marco A. Hernandez decided that Cox is not entitled to protection under Oregon’s media shield law because she is not “affiliated with any newspaper, magazine, periodical, book, pamphlet, news service, wire service, news or feature syndicate, broadcast station or network, or cable television system.” He disagrees with her self-identification as “media,” but goes on to say that even if she were entitled protection, it would not be granted due to the case being a “civil action for defamation.”

This case highlights the gap between our slow-to-change institutions and the always-changing Internet. As Matthew Ingram at GigaOm pointed out, there are “shield laws” in 40 states, “but some have been updated to include cover newer forms of media such as blogs, and others haven’t.” Just a little bit north in Washington state, Cox would’ve been protected by an expanded shield law. Read more

How Does the Internet of 1996 Compare to 2011? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Fifteen years ago, in 1996, I was still in middle school. We had one computer (a really old Apple) in our house and logging onto AOL was by dial-up only, took at least five minutes and ended with that cheerful voice saying, “You’ve got mail!” (Anyone miss this?) The Internet has definitely changed a lot, and for the better, in a decade and a half.

For those of you interested in a visual representation of those changes, check out this wonderful infographic by Online University comparing the Internet of 1996 to today. Read more