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Posts Tagged ‘policies’

Your Tweets Are Not Your Own And You Will Get Fired For Them

I’m shocked that public figures are still getting fired for what they say and do on the internet. Especially people who work in media. Sure, Pax Dickinson, brogrammer extraordinaire, was just CTO over at Business Insider, but this is a publication for the internet and of the internet. Someone there should have told him to put a sock in it — just blocking him is not enough for a news pub.

Gannett’s social media policy was posted on Romenesko yesterday. Perhaps they were shocked, too, and thought it was time for a refresher. Read it. Basically, anything you post can and will be held against you. I think that’s fair policy for media people. The rub for us is that while it’s all held against you, you don’t have the right to remain silent, either.

Like probably having to work weekends and holidays, the lack of delineation between our personal and professional digital selves is part of the job. It’s about being your own brand. From the Gannett policy:

Remember that social networks are forms of public expression and should be used for strategic reasons to enhance your journalism, engage your community of followers, enlighten your news outlet’s audience, and promote your news organization’s brand in a positive way. Like other forms of public expression – attending political demonstrations, voicing opinions on a talk show, making political campaign contributions – they are subject to the limitations that are placed on newsroom employees through the Principles of Ethical Conduct. These are designed to maintain credibility with the reader.

Putting “all tweets are my own” or some spin on that in might help you if you need to make a case for being fired for something you said, but it doesn’t protect you. So use the characters to make your bio more interesting. Especially if you’re employed by a news publication, your tweets are not yours. They belong to the digital strategy and marketing team. Don’t you know that nothing is proprietary on the interwebs?

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

ESPN’s ‘Don’t Break News On Twitter’ Mandate Short-Sighted

ESPN has a history of both breaking news and of less than social-media-friendly practices. In 2009, the network took heat for its guidelines that at the time banned talent from sports related commentary on social networks.

Obviously, a lot can change in two years and as the medium developed, so did ESPN and other sports reporters social media savvy. Today, those reporters are looked to precisely for their news and commentary on social networks.

Well, maybe not so much has changed. Last week, an updated set of social networking guidelines started circulating. And while some of the points are to-be-expected and valid:

Think before your tweet. … If you wouldn’t say it on the air or write it in a column, don’t post it on any social network.

Others seem to be keeping staff on too tight of a leash, and at least one item in the policy comes across incredibly short-sighted to anyone who produces news or follows those producers on social media.

Do not break news on Twitter. We want to serve fans in the social sphere, but the first priority is to ESPN news and information efforts. Public news (i.e. announced in news conferences) can be distributed with- out vetting. However, sourced or proprietary news must be vetted by the TV or Digital news desks. Once reported on an ESPN platform, that news can (and should) be distributed on Twitter and other social sites.

I had to check the calendar to make sure this document was really date stamped August 2011.
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