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Posts Tagged ‘the new yorker’

Was Condé Nast Right to Nix Their Internships?

Conde-Nast“Everything I learned about journalism I learned in J-school,” said no one ever.

Where I learned best was in my internships — the good, bad, ugly, paid, unpaid, unpaid (but for school credit!), East Coast, Congress Avenue, random roommate-living, sleeping-on-couches type of internships that many of us have done.

Operating under that assumption, I’m still scratching my head as to why Condé Nast decided to can their highly-sought after internship positions altogether.

Think about it: publication interns start out doing the basics — fact checking, research, maybe writing some blurbs and perhaps some reporting. I was fortunate enough to learn how to edit B-roll, become dangerous with HTML and write good Web headlines throughout three internships. Interns tread lightly. These are things that you need to know how to do exceptionally well the second you step into an interview for a media company (unless you came from a stellar college paper newsroom where you really got your feet wet).

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Why Journalists Should Be Hosting Sponsored Events

With a fresh school year ramping up, I’ve noticed several news publications beginning to big-time promote the special events they’re heading up this fall.

It seems like more of these kinds of gatherings keep popping up, or maybe it’s that they were there before and are now being Tweeted and Facebooked about more often.

For each organization, it’s a bit different. The Texas Tribune Festival packs tons of experts in the online paper’s coverage areas — energy, health care, public education, etc. — along with political big-wigs like Texas Sen. Wendy Davis and First Lady Anita Perry into a weekend of discussion about all things political in the Lone Star State. Only a couple of years old, the Festival is a huge deal in Austin and beyond. And the Trib’s Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith, who has become something of a poster child for raising big cash for online news, plays an important role in the weekend, helping to moderate discussion and serve as a reminder to guests why they’re all there – because of the Texas Tribune’s reporting and how it has proved itself in the world of Web journalism.

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MATTER: Returning to Long-Form Journalism

Earlier this month, I talked about three enterprising Kickstarter campaignsOuter Voices Podcast, Radio Ambulante, and The Independent Voice Project. Recently, another great journalism-focused project has started making news, and it’s called MATTER.

MATTER is the brain child of Jim Giles and Bobbie Johnson, two experienced reporters with a passion for making journalism better. Giles and Johnson have lined up a team of writers and editors to help push this vision forward, and according to the Kickstarter project page, MATTER will be for readers, not advertisers.

MATTER logo

The “return to long-form journalism” is a phrase that has been bandied about for a few years now, and several websites currently exist around this premise (Longreads, The Atavist, Byliner, Longform, etc.) MATTER won’t be a curation service; rather, it will include original investigative reporting from their team of writers, some of which have contributed to publications such as The New YorkerThe Atlantic, The Economist, The Guardian, The New York Times, National Geographic, Nature and Wired.

“The thing about long-form, in-depth journalism is that it’s expensive. There used to be many more newspapers and magazines that produced that sort of content, but journalism is in financial trouble and those outlets have cut back,” said Giles.

The Kickstarter campaign will help raise funds for MATTER to produce their first three pieces. By pledging at the $25 level, you can join their editorial board (powered by All Our Ideas) and lend your voice to the kind of reporting MATTER covers.

As of this article, the project is over 60% funded, but you can pledge until the campaign ends on March 24, 2012. For more information about MATTER, you can visit their website at readmatter.com. You can also follow the progress of MATTER on Facebook and Twitter.