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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Your Twitter Chat Is Stressing Me Out

twitter logoTwitter is stressing me out. It all culminated this weekend when I wanted to waste some time on an Amtrak train, but couldn’t focus. The journo chatter was too loud. Jacob Harris seemed to understand me:

But while he seemed ambivalent about the noise, it was making me properly anxious. Not only is the conference streaming in my feed, but then you’re having inter-conference #chats, too. Of course, this could be a personal problem. I’ll disclose that because of some family matters, I’ve had to take a step back from being plugged in 24 hours a day. Since I’m not forced to post, write, or respond to news like I normally do, maybe the noisiness is more obvious to me. I can’t use it right now, therefore it is meaningless. That might be too easy of an out.

The thing is, we journalists talk too much. I like following Twitter chats — #mucked up or #wjchat — until I actually follow them. At some point in refreshing my feed and discerning what you’re trying to say about advertising and wearables in your MT of a RT of an A1 to Q2 I give up and go see what @unfoRETTAble is watching. Read more

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This Is Why You Don’t Show Twitter Streams Live On TV

It could happen to anyone: You’re following a hashtag or a trending news topic on Twitter, and bam, you’re assaulted with hashtag spam or, worse, some sexually explicit item you don’t want to see.

Most of us quickly scroll away or close the browser, offended and put off for seconds. But what if you can’t pan away quick enough to avert not only your eyes but your viewers eyes from seeing … well everything?

Denver TV Station Fox 31 found out the hard way yesterday that you really need to curate that user-generated content before you put it up on screen. In the course of scrolling through Twitter images of the deadly helicopter crash in Seattle, the show went to the Twitter feed of photos from the crash scene.

Unfortunately, this was a crash course in the crassness of the Internet. The images weren’t selected ahead of time and so ended up being a hodge podge of pictures, including some off-topic and inappropriate things users had tagged to ride the coattails of the news cycle. That’s how the Denver morning show team ended up showing some non-relevant images that included food, Edward Scissors Hands and a penis. Yeah, that. On live TV. The reaction of shock on the anchors’ faces says it all:

surprisetweet

Many of the videos of this have been pulled down, but if you for some reason want to see the actual broadcast, Deadspin still has it posted in full. (Obviously, NSFW.)

The station did issue an apology, but it’s the type of thing you can’t unsee — and a lesson we hope nobody else needs to re-learn.

While reporting breaking news about the crash of the KOMO-TV helicopter in Seattle, FOX31 Denver accidentally broadcast an offensive photo while scrolling live through a Twitter feed of pictures from the crash scene.

The photo was mistakenly broadcast by our control room. It did not come from the tablet many viewers saw being used by one of our anchors.

We apologize for the inadvertent broadcast of the image and we are taking immediate steps to prevent such an accident from happening again.

This is why you don’t show uncurated feeds on live TV. And while we’re on it, really, you should be verifying any of those images you share before airing them anyway. This wouldn’t have happened if that step had taken place.

(h/t Deadspin)

Journalists Reading Mean Reader Comments (Video)

It’s been done by celebrities, but any journalist who’s ever been published online knows cruel commentary from the masses isn’t reserved for the famous.

sharetheloveValentine-webkindThe Indianapolis Star newspaper wants to change the tenor of conversation, and recorded several of its journalists this week reading some of the comments users have left on their articles, columns and editorial cartoons. They’re using the mean things people say as a tool to encourage readers near and far to #ShareTheLove this year with a social media campaign to accompany the video.

Among their requests for visitors to #ShareTheLove?

Diffuse one unkind person today. Go to the comments on any story on IndyStar.com, or on social media — or anywhere online — and give someone a compliment. Tell them you love their hair in their profile photo. Or that you wish they have a wonderful day. Or, simply, tell them to #ShareTheLove. Celebrate the love while diffusing the hate.

To be honest, a lot of those comments were tame compared to what I’ve seen on their site and read about my own work. But they’re still mean. From “It’s going to cost the Star some subscribers AND Facebook followers” to “I know a really good stylist and photographer if you’re interested in upgrading your professional image,” it’s clear they were meant to be mean and succeeded. My favorite of the readers, who range from online editors to news columnists to the Publisher, was columnist Leslie Bailey — who previously wrote about the mean things people say — when she read the two-word comment that sort of sums up most of the comments on the Web: “You’re Dumb.”

If nothing else, I’m glad to see these professionals taking the “criticism” that’s anything but constructive or critical thinking in stride. Keep on keeping on, and oh yeah, share the love!

What Happens When Journalists Show Up To An Unprepared Sochi: Twitter Gold

Journalists often fall into one of two extremes: The nothing-fazes-me, I’ve-seen-everything sort, and the quick-to-complain, give-me-what-I-want-now set. It’s not often the two overlap, but this week both of those types have a reason to vent in unison.

That’s because the cadre of journalists covering this year’s winter Olympics have arrived and taken to Twitter to vent their frustration and amusement with how host-city Sochi is so unprepared for this year’s winter games. It’s the most expensive Olympics in history, and many reporters report their hotel rooms aren’t finished or are lacking essential ingredients, like running water, light bulbs or even door knobs.

If there were a medal for making us appreciate what we have, these guys would have won the gold. The following are my favorites, but the Washington Post collected many more good (or bad depending how you look at it) observations as well:

Dan Wetzel, of Yahoo Sports, joked that “Early impressions of Sochi is that everything should be ready and spectacular for the 2015 Winter Games.” He wrote at length about what he encountered when he arrived in Sochi to find an unprepared hotel and city, but he also shared this:

Sorry folks, they fixed his doorknob, so the offer’s not valid anymore. But he might be in the market to trade for some new light fixtures soon: Read more

The Great Gmail Outage of 2014

googleGmail’s is down and on a wintry Friday afternoon, that should be a good thing. Or, not.

Here’s what we learned about ourselves when email stops working:

It was pretty frustrating.

 

And we learned that we sort of miss things we don’t even like, or use.

We learned that Yahoo has an account.

  That there might be life away from the computer.

That email breaks are always good for traffic.

And, some sound advice for journos, in case this ever happens again.

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