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Posts Tagged ‘@al3x’

Twitter API Lead Alex Payne Quits To Open "A Bank That Doesn't Suck"

Alex Payne (@al3x), who has worked at Twitter since March 2007 and been API lead for most of that time, has left the company to join BankSimple, which bills itself as “an easy, intuitive, and social bank for people who appreciate simple online services.” Payne is a co-founder, and will have the role of Chief Product & Technology Officer.

He announced his move on Twitter.

Alex Payne Leaves Twitter For BankSimple

Walking away from Twitter wasn’t an easy decision. Working there has been a life- and career-changing experience. I’ve learned all sorts of lessons, made great friends, and worked on something that millions of people now use every day.

On BankSimple:

Imagine, for a moment, a bank that doesn’t suck.

A bank that doesn’t gouge you with fees.
A bank that doesn’t treat you like crap.
A bank that cares about design, but gets out of your way.
A bank that puts your money to work automatically.
A bank that’s building a platform for the future of personal finance.

Sounds good. Read more at his blog.

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Twitter Proposes The Release Of API Limits, Tweet Metadata, Becoming Your Online Identity, And More

There’s an interesting article today over at Techrader that outlines some of the plans Twitter is making for the future of the platform, as provided by Alex Payne, Twitter’s API lead.

Alex Payne (@al3x)

(Image source: Techradar.)

Alex is definitely saying all the right things. On scalability:

“Hopefully we’ve already been through the catastrophe phase. Where we’re at now is very, very different; fundamental pieces of our technology have changed. We’ve built out a really robust system; it doesn’t just handle tweets, it handles every operation around the site. Whenever you’re sending a direct message, whenever you’re adding someone, whenever you’re blocking someone it goes through this system we’ve built.

We’ve pitted it against the other big enterprise grade message queue systems out there and we’ve pretty much smoked them all in terms of benchmarks.”

On the development of the tweet:

“In a perfect world we’d like every tweet to have its own key value store for whatever metadata [developers] want. In terms of implementation it’s still too far off to say when we’re going to deliver that; the majority of our team is still focused on handling the scale of the social graph.”

On the future of Twitter’s API:

“It doesn’t make sense to have apps ask us again and again ‘do you have anything new? Do you have anything new?’… Whether that’s data or changes to the social graph, it makes more sense that we push that information to them so they’re always up to date.”

On this, Twitter plans to introduce a ‘push API’ service and also to release the limit of API calls that external applications can make, which is currently set at 100 per hour per user.

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