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Posts Tagged ‘HootSuite Pro’

HootSuite Pro Tip – Clear Your Cache To Speed Things Up (And Removed Unwanted Tweets)

Regular readers will be aware that I’m a long-term, big fan of HootSuite.

I’m a pro subscriber, which means I’m actually paying to tweet. That’s fine – for me, and my team at work, HootSuite is totally indispensable.

At least, for now. In this crazy, app-filled world, nothing is forever, and no product can ever hope to buy permanent loyalty. You have to keep pushing forward and over-achieving, because things can change real fast.

In my opinion, HootSuite is currently the closest thing we have to the perfect Twitter client, but that doesn’t mean it is perfect. There are a few niggles that have always bothered me. One of these is after long periods of activity and tweets the software can get bogged down and sluggish. The other is how when you block a user their tweets are meant to instantly be removed from your timeline (you know, like on Twitter.com), but HootSuite keeps them for an indefinite period – sometimes days. That sucks – nobody wants to look at ugly for that long.

Thankfully, I’ve discovered a way to eliminate both of these problems in just a couple of clicks. It’s no big secret, but it was news to me – HootSuite has an inbuilt cache which you can clear any time you like. It works like your normal browser cache, and here’s how to do it.

  1. Open HootSuite
  2. Click on the Settings icon (cog), and then Preferences.
  3. Click on ‘Clear Cached Messages’

I know, I know – it couldn’t be an easier or more obvious. But, but… I’m pretty sure that this is a new feature to HootSuite as I’ve never noticed it before. Or maybe I’m the Bruce Willis character in this particular iteration of The Sixth Sense, and the last person to know.

But hey – who cares, right? I got what I wanted. And now, in one fell swoop anyone can use that button to clear all the crap that HootSuite has been building up in the background. Plus, it will also remove any lingering tweets from users you’ve long-since blocked. The latter alone is worth the price of admission.

Sure, it would be nice if this could be automated in some way, and maybe that’s just around the corner. Because as I said, HootSuite has to keep striving forward. Especially when they’re asking for our credit card.

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I Just Upgraded To @HootSuite Pro (Which Means I'm Actually Paying For Twitter)

Time to put my money where my mouth is. Yep – I can now say I am actually paying to tweet.

As regular readers will know, I’ve been a huge fan of HootSuite since way back. My team and I find the software absolutely invaluable at work, and the new Pro package monthly subscription ($5.99, plus $15 per user – note, not per social network, which are unlimited with the pro plan) was a small price to pay.

I didn’t do the Ow.ly vanity URL, because I don’t want that – I want bit.ly, and that isn’t yet an option, which is frustrating. But everything else has become essential.

A free version of HootSuite is still available, although business users are kind of over a barrel here as the free option doesn’t come with any of the features we’ve come to know and love, and is really for single users only. Which is fair enough. If you’re making money with Twitter, then Twitter – and associates – should probably be taking a little back from you.

I hope that HootSuite continue to add features to this plan and all this anti-freemium stuff works out for them, as if/until something better comes along the thought of downgrading to TweetDeck or CoTweet simply does not appeal. This is a bold but in my opinion welcome move – now isn’t the time to just stagnate and count the cash.

Improve, improve, improve – most importantly, listen to what your users want.

Just for the record, I’m not affiliated with HootSuite (although I should be, by jove) now affiliated with HootSuite. Why? Because I believe in it. If you’re a fan and using HootSuite for business purposes on Twitter, do the right thing and upgrade.

You can find more details on the Pro service here.

HootSuite Adds Influence And Keyword Filters, User Insights And Announces Premium Paid Packages

Some new updates from HootSuite today, which already was (in my opinion) the closest thing we have to a perfect Twitter client, and with each upgrade gets that little bit better. These new features – which the company has termed social relationship and support tools - aren’t going to change your world, but they’re welcome and for some users will have value.

Filters on Twitter are always useful, and HootSuite has added a choice of two – by influence (based on a user’s Klout score) and keyword. Here’s influence cranked up to a heady Klout rating of 75.

And a keyword search for links:

The former has some use but while I think filters will play an important part in the future of Twitter – if only to cut down the mounting noise (especially in trending topics and searches) – they need to built into Twitter to work properly. If I want to filter something out or in, then really I need to be given the option to make that permanent until I change my mind. Having to do it on the fly is nice, but nowhere near as useful. Especially every single time.

TweetDeck has offered this functionality since day one, of course, and I never really saw it as much more than a novelty on that platform, either. Handy for quick stream-searches, but not much else. As said, filters need to come from Twitter’s end to be a true game-changer.

HootSuite’s new Insights feature provides an overview of a given user’s social presence. An insight, if you will.

For example, here’s Copyblogger’s Brian Clark:

And here’s mine:

What’s that all about? Nice, HootSuite, nice. After all the good work I’ve done for you. You could have just hand-written in something for me like ‘very busy’ or ‘probably on Facebook, too’. Sheesh.

Finally, and really the most exciting bit of news of the lot, HootSuite confirmed that premium accounts are on the way. Don’t worry – they realise this won’t be for everybody.

Keep in mind, HootSuite will remain free for an estimated 95% of users based on current usage patterns. Meanwhile, premium users will enjoy access to extra features, high limits and prioritized support.

But for those who are happy to pay for more, what can they expect for their cash? Well:

  • Unlimited social networks
  • Unlimited RSS feeds
  • Team members on social networks
  • Advanced analytics & reports
  • Expedited support

That’s all very nice, but it isn’t that nice. I hope they throw in custom (bit.ly) URLs, better block management and some other bits and pieces, too.

No news yet on price, but… if that’s all that premium means, then it’d better be very cheap. I absolutely believe there’s a market for a professional, subscription-based Twitter client, but it needs to be absolutely feature-packed and offer services and functions that none of the free clients can possibly match.

And then keep doing it, too.

HootSuite Preparing "Ow.ly Pro" URL Shortener

Further to my article about the changes on HootSuite earlier this morning, an email I’ve just received announces their plans for Ow.ly Pro, which will allow publishers to use their own vanity URLs on the HootSuite platform.

Get on the list for “Ow.ly Pro,” which will give you the ability to bring your own vanity URL for branding and style points and be among the first to get your URLs shortened — just the way you want.

The more perceptive amongst you will have noticed that this sounds very much like Bit.ly Pro, which charges a hefty $995 per month for a similar feature. If HootSuite undercuts this and improves their statistical system, this could get very interesting.

(Signup for more information about Ow.ly Pro here.)

Maybe @HootSuite Pro Is The Answer?

Maybe @HootSuite Pro Is The Answer?I’ve written before about how much I love HootSuite, and that the only thing that stops me from rating it as the perfect Twitter client is that it doesn’t allow users to choose which URL shortener they want. Instead, you’re stuck with ow.ly, which has some nice stats and things like that, but because of the frame ow.ly adopts is pretty unpopular with a lot of users.

End result? Your retweets suffer. Massively.

Jonathan proposes that a Greasemonkey script might be a workaround solution, and has found one here.

But hacks are never ideal. HootSuite has a big-enough user base – and is close enough to being perfect – that a premium version of the software could be well-received by a lot of fans, particularly the Twitter power-users and brands that love the superb features of the client.

For a few dollars a month – and I mean a few – HootSuite Pro could give us:

  1. A choice of URL shortener (of course, everybody should go for bit.ly, but having a choice is the way to go) with full integration, including the stats
  2. More profiles
  3. Better management of our HootSuite team (i.e., being able to see stats for each)

Of course, this would all sync perfectly with the HootSuite iPhone app (which is highly recommended) as it does now (but you’d lose the ads). It would be nice to see things like Twitter-style retweets appearing in our stream, too.

Where’s the downside? HootSuite gets a revenue stream, and lots of us get what we want.

Why are desktop-based Twitter apps so scared of charging for their fine products? Hasn’t the success of Tweetie et al taught us anything? If you make your client absolutely first class, people will pay. They won’t pay a lot, but enough of them will pay something to make a difference for you. And you can still fund everybody else with adverts and ow.ly.

Here’s the thing: for me, stuff like Facebook and Foursquare implementation within my Twitter client is not important. In fact, I don’t care. If I want Facebook, I’ll go to Facebook.com.

However, if I want Twitter, going to Twitter.com isn’t really the best solution. That’s why I go to HootSuite. But if I have to co-manage HootSuite with bit.ly sidebar (for links) and Twitter.com (for retweets) then the process is broken.

And when somebody comes along who fixes all of this, I, like a ton of other people, will inevitably jump ship. HootSuite’s in a position here to do something really special. Let’s hope they make their move in time.