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Doonesbury Comics Find Online Home at WaPo

The Washington Post is now the home for all things Doonesbury. The paper announced today that doonesbury.com has been relocated to doonesbury.washingtonpost.com. Along with Gary Trudeau’s work, the site will feature lots of other nifty features, including:

BLOWBACK: A moderated forum of interesting comments on the strip from readers around the world.
FAQ: Answers to reader queries about the strip and its long and complex history and plotlines. “How did Mike and Kim meet?” We’ll show you.
SAYWHAT?: Highlights a notable odd, inexplicable or embarrassing comment by a public figure, five days a week.
MUDLINE: A scrolling line of negative sound bites each week by public figures, primarily political players and pundits.
FLASHBACKS: A page which allows you to read the strip in eight different timeframes daily– 5,10,15,20,25,30,35 and 40 years ago. Fans can see how past storylines explain and connect to those of the present.
THE SANDBOX: A collection of almost 800 posts by 150 soldiers, including those deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, returned vets as well as writing by caregivers and spouses.
YALE STRIPS: The original proto-Doonesbury strip “Bull Tales,” which ran in the Yale Daily News.

Check it out here.

DC Journalism Awards Round Up

It’s award season and, as always, DC journalism is receiving top accolades from all corners. Here’s a run down of the Washington journos and outlets that have been honored most recently:

Jonathan Cohn of The New Republic has won the Sidney Hillman Award for Excellence in Reporting in Service of the Common Good in Magazine Journalism for his story, “The Hell of American Daycare.” The award will be presented on May 6th at the Times Center in New York City.

George E. Condon Jr. of the National Journal  has won the newly created President’s Award from the White House Correspondent’s Association. The award will be presented on May 3rd at the WHCA Dinner.

The Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications Hall of Achievement at Northwestern University has inducted a new batch of honorees including William Eaton, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and former President of the Washington Press Club, who will be honored posthumously. Mary Pat Flaherty of The Washington Post was also honored. They will be officially inducted at a ceremony on May 15 at the Chicago History Museum.

And WTOP has been awarded five Regional Edward R. Murrow awards by the Radio Television Digital News Association, including one for Overall Excellence and one for Breaking News for their coverage of the Navy Yard shooting. WTOP’s Kristi King was also  recognized for feature reporting, Jonathan Warner for Sport Reporting, and Lori Lundin for Hard News Feature Reporting.

Former CIA Director Hayden to Washington Times

The Washington Times announced today that Gen. Michael Hayden, a retired four-star U.S. Air Force general and former Director of both the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, will write a new bi-monthly column for the paper called “Inside Intelligence.” His first column will run April 30th.

Hayden is the latest in a string of big named columnists to join TWT in recent months, including former House Majority Leader Tom Delay, Christine O’Donnell and Tammy Bruce. Read more on those hires here.

Mr. Manners Takes Up a New Post

The Washington Post has hired Steven Petrow (aka Mr. Manners) to write an advice column with a special focus on LGBTQ issues. The column, dubbed “Civilities,” will be published bi-weekly on Mondays and will focus on things like whether a father should walk his son down the aisle, or how an enlisted soldier should address his commanding officer’s husband. Petrow has written five books, and currently writes the “Manners Hero of the Week” column for Parade. He also previously wrote an etiquette column for The New York Times.

In his first column today, Petrow reflects on the changes that have happened in the country since he first started giving advice on gay issues. Read the whole thing here.

(Photo by Bryan Regan)

 

What the Washingtonian Wants from a Personal Essay

magazines_articleIn part three of our four-part Personal Essay Markets series, we spoke with editors from 15 different mags to get the details on what they’re looking for in a personal essay.

Here, an editor from the Washingtonian shares his advice on pitching the pub’s “First Person” section:

Washingtonian – “First Person”
The back-page essay in this magazine should have a Washington, D.C., angle, and it’s best if the writer lives in or has lived in the area. Past examples include an essay by a 15-year-old heart transplant recipient about meeting her donor family, and a piece by a public defender about how she does work that many find indefensible.
Length: 600 words
Pay: $1 a word
Assigning editor: Bill O’Sullivan, BOSULLIVAN at WASHINGTONIAN dot COM
O’Sullivan’s advice: “Get in fast — 600 words isn’t much space, so you have to set up your story quickly. Be sure you have something to say (an essay as opposed to an anecdote) and fill it with as many specific details and mini anecdotes as possible. Keep in mind that this is a story, not an opinion piece.”

For more, including similar details about Working Mother, read: Personal Essay Markets, Part III.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

And the Pulitzers Go To…

A complete list of all the 2014 Pulitzer Awards for Journalism announced today:

Public Service
The Guardian US
-for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, helping through aggressive reporting to spark a debate about the relationship between the government and the public over issues of security and privacy.
The Washington Post -for its revelation of widespread secret surveillance by the National Security Agency, marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.

Breaking News Reporting
Staff of The Boston Globe -for its exhaustive and empathetic coverage of the Boston Marathon bombings and the ensuing manhunt that enveloped the city, using photography and a range of digital tools to capture the full impact of the tragedy.

Investigative Reporting
Chris Hamby of The Center for Public Integrity, Washington, DC -for his reports on how some lawyers and doctors rigged a system to deny benefits to coal miners stricken with black lung disease, resulting in remedial legislative efforts.

Read more

Easley Leaves The Hill for Morning Consult

Jonathan Easley has left The Hill, where he had been covering healthcare policy since 2011, to become health editor for the Morning Consult, FBDC has learned. Morning Consult -a daily health policy briefing – was founded by pollster Michael Ramlet in 2009 and recently expanded their coverage to the energy sector as well.

Easley has also written for Roll Call and Salon, and prior to his career in journalism, worked for ten years in the finance sector. He takes over from former health editor Meghan McCarthy, who has been promoted to managing editor.

Washington City Paper Hosts Best of DC Fete

20140409_192414Last night at Carnegie Library, Washington City Paper hosted it’s Best of DC Fete featuring small plates and drinks from more than 50 of the top food and beverage establishments in DC. The event coincided with the City Paper’s “Best of” issue, naming everything from the Best Contemporary American Restaurant (readers’ pick: Founding Farmers) and Best Sandwich (readers’ pick: Taylor Gourmet) to the Best Place to Get Your Bike Fixed (readers’ pick: BicycleSPACE) and Best Place to Buy Home Furnishings (readers’ pick: Miss Pixies).

The evening was a completely gluttonous affair -and well attended -only slightly diminished by paltry booze offerings. Fortunately there were enough small plates circulating, that we had plenty of other things with which to occupy our senses.

The highlight of the night was the burger served by STK – the steakhouse slash lounge – opening in Dupont Circle on April 25. Their signature mini was by far the best plate of the night. Best drink, according to Fishbowl, goes to Ping Pong Dim Sum with its roasted lemon and basil lemonade.

Read more

Chuck Todd Loves Musicals

Chuck Todd sat for a Q&A with The Hill‘s Bob Cusack today. Apparently the NBC politics chief and former French horn player has a thing for the theatre:

I love musicals and show tunes. As a high school and college French horn player, my favorite gigs were playing in pit orchestras for musicals and learning the words to every song in the show. To this day, I think, with just a rehearsal, I could sing the lead (probably not well) to “Brigadoon.”

 

Quartz’s Ferdman to Wonkblog

robertoQuartz’s Roberto Ferdman has been picked up by Wonkblog as a staff writer. In an announcement today, the Washington Post said Ferdman, who had been based in New York, would move down in June. While at Quartz, Ferdman covered an eclectic array of topics (dog food, most recently), and will do so again in his capacity at Wonkblog. His beat there will include consumer business, the economics of food, Latin American development and immigration. His first day at WaPo will be June 9th.

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