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Posts Tagged ‘James Murdoch’

Morning Reading List, 12.26.07

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Good morning Washington.

Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | JOBS

  • You don’t want a lifetime subscription to Time or Newsweek. Is US Weekly more your style?

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Are you one of the many headed to IA for New Year’s Eve? Politico’s Aoife McCarthy and Michael Calderone lay out your First Night options. And Poltico’s Ryan Grim reports on the social scene among politicos and journos in Des Moines.

  • The NYT wasn’t that impressed with Dana Milbank’s new book.

  • The PEJ Talk Show Index for the week of December 9-14 shows, “All year long, Hillary Clinton has dominated the campaign conversation on the talk airwaves. And last week, signs that the Democratic battle for president might be tightening had many hosts talking up the idea of a Clinton swoon.”

  • Deb Howell says that even critics have their critics (you don’t say…). And Clark Hoyt fields reader questions.

  • Howie Kurtz on covering Iowa.

  • Financial Times named newspaper of the year

  • The Fix asks, “Each state has its Yepsen — the political reporter par excellence who tend to drive the coverage of a campaign or a candidate. … Who are we missing? Live in a state where one political reporter (or political pundit) dominates the landscape? Sound off in the comment section below and we’ll add the list to this post.”

  • The Guardian reports,James Murdoch, the new head of News International, has vowed to ‘set the pace’ in the newspaper industry and promised to decide on the new location for its headquarters ‘in the new year’.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The adult children of slain New York Times reporter David Rosenbaum have reached a confidential settlement with Howard University Hospital, ending a year-old lawsuit that accused the hospital and D.C. emergency workers of negligence and medical malpractice.”

  • The Los Angeles Times reports, “For the second time in eight years, control of the Los Angeles Times changed hands Thursday, passing from a staid Chicago conglomerate to a private company headed by an unpredictable and colorful billionaire, in a debt-heavy deal that creates tremendous opportunities and risks for one of America’s top newspapers.”

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    TV

  • “Larry King Reflects: When ‘CNN Wasn’t in Washington’”

  • An ABC release announced, “As Iowans become the first in the nation to have their say in the 2008 campaign, ABC News will provide comprehensive coverage of the Iowa Caucuses. On Wednesday, January 2 and Thursday, January 3, ‘World News’ and ‘Nightline’ will both originate from Des Moines, Iowa, with anchors Charles Gibson and Terry Moran reporting from the field. On Thursday, January 3, Diane Sawyer and Chris Cuomo launch ABC News’ full day of coverage with a live broadcast of ‘Good Morning America’ from Des Moines.”

  • What about a license for local reporting?

  • Leonard Shapiro’s annual sports broadcasting “year in review” column.

  • TVNewser reports, “Imus on Brokaw: ‘He’s Not the Guy I’d Want to be In A Foxhole With’”

  • Jim Lehrer on the writing life.

  • A release announced, “Reuters, C-SPAN and Zogby International have joined forces to poll Americans on the 2008 presidential election, starting with polls in the key U.S. presidential primary and caucus states. The effort will kick off on Dec. 30 with daily tracking polls from Iowa ahead of that state’s caucuses scheduled for Jan. 3. Daily tracking polls from New Hampshire will begin on Jan. 4 ahead of that state’s Jan. 8 primary. The polling will continue through the general election in November.”

  • Thomson Financial reports, “Moody’s Investors Service said the downturn in print advertising led by classified advertisements for real estate continues to support its negative rating outlook on the US newspaper industry.”

  • E&P’s Joe Strupp, “Herewith my annual list of the top ten newspaper industry stories — not all of them grim.”

  • USC announced, “Twenty-five arts journalists have been chosen from 18 states to participate as fellows in the fourth National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Arts Journalism Institute in Theater and Musical Theater at USC Annenberg. Through the generous support of the NEA, the Institute will be conducted by USC Annenberg’s School of Journalism in Los Angeles from February 5–15, 2008.” For the full list, click here.

  • A release announced, “The Parents Television Council congratulates several companies for taking responsibility for their television ads that ended up on shows filled with graphic sex, violence or profanity. Television sponsors are often contacted by the PTC to inform them of the type of content they are sponsoring on television, particularly during hours when children are watching, and to call on the companies to reevaluate their sponsorships and media buying guidelines.”

  • In a letter submitted to Citizens United, lawyers for Sen. Barack Obama demanded that Citizens United remove “all audio and video footage of Senator Obama” from its new political documentary, Hillary: The Movie. The film includes a clip of Senator Obama’s Nov. 26, 2007, interview with ABC’s Nightline, in which he criticized Sen. Hillary Clinton for “claiming basically the entire eight years of the Clinton presidency as her own.”

  • TVNewser reports, “CourtTVNews.com Shutting Down”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Comedy Central’s ‘The Daily Show with Jon Stewart’ and ‘The Colbert Report’ will return to production next month without writers. Both shows will resume on Jan. 7, Comedy Central, a unit of Viacom Inc., said today in an e-mailed statement.”

  • Biz Report reports, “A recent survey by Harris Interactive found an increase in the number of television viewers that are turning to the Internet instead of their plasmas for their visual entertainment. The survey of 2,455 U.S. adults showed that overall online viewership has risen from 74 percent last year to 81 percent this year.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Google reports, “We’re bidding adieu to 2007 with a look back at the breaking news, the big events and the must-have gadgets that captivated us this year (give or take a few weeks; we compile this list by early December). To get a glimpse of what’s been on our collective consciousness, we mined billions of search queries to discover what sorts of things rose to the top. We encourage you to check out our findings to see if you, too, reflect the zeitgeist — the spirit of the times.”

  • Slate says Christmas is possible, but very, very unlikely.

  • ars technica reports, “It’s not every day that a senator takes to the floor to defend “Internet blogs and other Web-based forms of media,” but Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) has done just that in his recent push to pass a Freedom of Information Act reform bill he has coauthored with two Republicans.”

  • blingboing reports, “Five years ago, Dave Winer made a ‘long bet’ with New York Times executive Martin Nisenholtz: ‘In a Google search of five keywords or phrases representing the top five news stories of 2007, weblogs will rank higher than the New York Times’ Web site.’”

  • CBROnline reports, “AOL announced it was acquiring New York-based Quigo on November 7 to expand its contextual advertising prowess, which basically matches text adverts to relevant Web pages. Quigo’s two main offerings are: AdSonar, which allows advertisers to buy ads on Websites based on specific pages, sections, topics or keywords; and FeedPoint, a search engine marketing business that helps retail advertisers manage their marketing relationships with search and comparison shopping engines.”

  • The Washington Post reports, “The $3.1 billion merger between Web search king Google and online ad giant DoubleClick approved by U.S. regulators yesterday may create an advertising powerhouse of unrivaled reach and knowledge of Internet users’ lives, desires and interests.”

  • Hollywood Reporter reports, “Ad spending for the first three quarters of 2007 dipped 0.1%, but spending on the Internet continued to soar, with a 15.9% increase over the same period last year, the Nielsen Co. said Thursday.”

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    MAGAZINES

  • IMA reports, “The Economist is drawing up plans for a social network following the decision to invest in its site and socialise its content. The magazine wants to develop a major portal for its 3m readers and create what it calls ‘a conversation between them’.”

  • What did Tucker Carlson learn from his adveture with Ron Paul? “People really hate the Federal Reserve” Learn more here.

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    RADIO

  • An NPR release announced, “The 28th annual New Year’s Eve special Toast of the Nation rings in 2008 with nine hours of live jazz, swing, samba and salsa from leading music venues across the country. NPR Music and WBGO/Jazz88.3FM in Newark, NJ reunite for their 23rd year of co-producing the special, which will air Monday, December 31 from 8:00PM-5:00AM(ET) on NPR Member stations nationwide.”

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    JOBS

  • The Aspen Institute is looking for a MLI Communications Officer.

  • U.S.News & World Report is looking for Summer interns.

  • The News Leader is looking for a Visual Journalist, Still Photography and Videography and for someone to write a great headline for our sports copy editing ad.

  • The The Associated Press is looking for a Medical/Science Writer-Washington DC.

  • Worldwatch Institute is looking for an Environmental Staff Writer.

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education is looking for a Business and Policy Reporter.

  • The Observer Newspapers is looking for a Reporter.

  • CongressDaily is looking for a Reporter.

  • UCG is looking for a Reporter.

  • American Sociological Association is looking for a Media Relations Officer.

  • Congressional Quarterly is looking for a Copy Editor for CQ Today and CQ Weekly.

  • A Fast-growing online business publisher is looking for a Editor-in-Chief.

  • National Public Radio is looking for a Deputy Supervising Senior Editor, News & Information.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

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    Morning Reading List, 12.10.07

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    Good morning Washington.

    For those of you wondering why we’re not including the Politico, Roll Call and The Hill in our “Pictures of Morning Papers” feature — which we’d love to do — it’s because a.) Politico and Roll Call are usually a day behind in posting theres and b.) The Hill hasn’t put one up since Nov. 28.

    Quickly navigate Morning Reading List:

    NEWSPAPERS | TV | ONLINE MEDIA | MAGAZINES | RADIO | WEST WING REPORTAGE | REVOLVING DOOR | JOBS

  • You don’t think the Hillary Clinton campaign is sitting on some big story on Obama.

    NEWSPAPERS

  • Washington Post’s Deborah Howell writes, “Stories about rumors are tricky and easily misconstrued. A Nov. 29 story and headline that explored Barack Obama’s ‘connections to the Muslim world’ and rumors that he is Muslim were met with a swift Internet reaction that left some staffers stunned at its ferocity. Even Post editorial cartoonist Tom Toles was ‘so upset’ that he took the unusual step of taking potshots at the story in an editorial page cartoon.”

  • AP reports, “Newspaper publishers, entering 2008 with some of the worst economic conditions in many years, said Wednesday they hope to bring even more readers — and ad spending — to their Web sites with expanded offerings of news, advertising and video.”

  • New York Times’ Clark Hoyt writes, “On Oct. 12, retired Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez, the former top military commander of American forces in Iraq, delivered a scathing denunciation of the Bush administration’s ‘incompetent’ management of the war — and an equally blistering denunciation of the news media.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Tribune Co., the newspaper publisher being taken private by real estate billionaire Sam Zell, plans to reduce borrowings by $500 million and confirmed the deal will close this year, sending the stock up nearly 8 percent.”

  • Page Six reports, “There’s a reason why it took so long for Ben Bradlee, 86, to receive the Legion of Honor from France, as the legendary Washington Post editor did last week. In the 1950s, when Bradlee was Newsweek’s Paris-based European bureau chief, he was expelled from the country for trying to interview leaders of Algeria’s revolutionary rebel army. His expulsion was repealed many years later, but the French are slow to forgive.”

  • Forbes.com reports, “You know what ails The New York Times Co.–eroding circulation, falling advertising revenue through the first three quarters of the year and the looming threat of stronger competition from The Wall Street Journal and its soon-to-be-owner Rupert Murdoch.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “Adapting to a changing news, information, and advertising economy means that newspapers must adapt the technology they use — not just online, but for print editions too.”

  • “Four veteran black sports journalists are taking a voluntary buyout offered at USA Today, wiping out its NBA coverage team, the USA Today staffers told Journal-isms on Saturday.”

  • SND Update Blog reports, “J. Ford Huffman, deputy managing editor of design at USA TODAY, one of the paper’s original architects and a 25-year veteran, has accepted a buyout — one of as many as 43 rumored to be pending (management sought 45 according to recent media reports).”

  • Slate’s Jack Shafer reports, “The World Health Organization publicly spanked the New York Times last week for breaking an embargoed study about measles. The offending article was a 60-word news brief by Celia W. Dugger in the paper’s Nov. 29 edition. No matter that the Times broke the embargo accidentally and apologized to WHO. The organization issued an e-mail announcing to the press corps the punishment—a two-week suspension of all Times reporters from the WHO media distribution list.”

  • The Center for American Progress reports, “Think Again: Reporting Iraq Is a Lot Harder than it Looks”

  • Bill Walsh, “national copy desk chief at The Washington Post and proprietor of The Slot: A Spot for Copy Editors, offers up the next set of well-edited bites” for Metrocurean.

  • Jeff Gannon writes, “The Old Media barely missed a toe-tapping beat in their relentless coverage of the Larry Craig ‘scandal’ to mention that a staffer for Democratic Sen. Maria Cantwell was arrested last week by the FBI after showing up for a sexual rendezvous with someone he believed to be a 13 year-old boy. The handling of the ‘incident’ by the Old Media provides a textbook example of pervasive liberal media bias I discuss in my book, ‘The Great Media War, A Battlefield Report’.”

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    TV

  • NBC Now Will Air Freedom’s Watch Ad

  • Satellite TV on the Move, at Fox News” (and more from TVNewser)

  • An ABC release announced, “ABC News Nightline will air original programming next week. Shows for the week include: a story about Oprah Winfrey campaigning with Democratic presidential hopeful Senator Barack Obama, an interview with Kay Warren, wife of famous evangelist Pastor Rick Warren and a profile of Francis Ford Coppola.”

  • BusinessWeek reports, “Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin has suffered a number of setbacks in his increasingly lonely fight against the cable companies. Martin, of course, is determined to place tighter regulations on the industry by restricting the reach of companies and allowing subscribers to pay only for the channels they want. Now, Democratic and Republican lawmakers—as well as Martin’s fellow commissioners—are questioning his selective use of data to support his campaign.”

  • USA Today reports, “Here’s a bit of cheery news for media executives concerned about the softening economy. Political campaigns likely will spend more than $4.5 billion on ads and marketing in the 2008 election season, a 64% leap from 2004 — the last cycle with a presidential race — research and consulting firm PQ Media says in a report out Thursday.”

  • Times Online reports,James Murdoch, the chief executive of BSkyB, is expected to step down today to take on the job of running News Corporation’s European and Asian operations. Mr Murdoch will be replaced by Jeremy Darroch, who is the chief financial officer of BSkyB. Sky is 39.1 per cent owned by News Corp, parent company of The Times.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Last week’s CNN/YouTube debate propelled the CNN program into the top 10 in all of cable news programs, the first time in more than two years that a single CNN program has cracked the top 10. The ranking is compiled by total viewers, Live +SD.”

  • B&C reports, “Some 1,500 communications attorneys, lobbyists and their guests, including a few ink-stained scribes, took refuge from the picture-postcard snow to gather at Washington, D.C.’s Hilton hotel Wednesday night for the annual Federal Communications Commission chairman’s dinner.”

  • Reuters reports, “According to the New York Post, the most recent rumblings rise from NBC, which is expected top make cuts in its news division, particularly at NBC News and MSNBC.”

  • A release announced, “MSNBC’s Decision 2008 coverage continues
    with a ‘Super Tuesday,’ Dec. 11, highlighted by in-depth analysis of the latest local and national poll numbers as the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary approach and the races heat up.”

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    ONLINE MEDIA

  • Washington City Paper’s Black Plastic Bag reports, “In response to the broken neck suffered by CNN anchor John Roberts, the media-insider blog FishbowlDC went with a Busta Rhymes reference. For the record, we here at BPB would’ve gone Shaolin-style with ‘Protect Ya Neck.’”

  • Slate launched its first portable widget: the official Bushisms Generator. You can read random Bushisms, hand-picked by Slate’s editor Jacob Weisberg by embedding the widget on your site. To embed the widget, visit this URL and hit “code” to copy and paste the HTML code directly on your site: http://www.clearspring.com/widgets/471f80ec102ef440

  • James Brady “is raising the question of just how much help you are allowed to have in putting your own name on the title page of a serious book. Am I nitpicking here or raising a legitimate question?”

  • Arianna Huffington writes, “Huckabee Tries to Shoot the Messenger, But Wounds His Campaign Instead”

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    MAGAZINES

  • A reader says, “scherer worked at salon, mother jones and the nation. hmm, i wonder what his political inclinations are? and yet, if time hired someone who had worked at the weekly standard, national review and wash times, there would be an uproar.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Macrovision, a California-based distributer of digital content, is buying TVGuide in a $2.8 billion deal.”

  • National Journal’s Bill Powers writes, “According to the media, we’re supposed to have learned all kinds of things from the rise of Mike Huckabee. … What I’ve taken away from the Huckabee phenomenon is that we should stop worrying so much about horse race journalism.”

  • NewsBusters reports, “Try to remember a time in September when it was reported that the Hillary Clinton campaign showed its ‘hard-nosed media strategy’ by getting GQ magazine to spike a piece on Clinton team in-fighting by threatening to pull access to Bill Clinton for GQ’s planned December ‘Man of the Year’ cover package. Well, that ‘Man of the Year’ issue is out, and there was no bucking, only fawning.”

  • Can you answer CQ’s Political Trivia for Dec. 7?

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    RADIO

  • Fenty offers part of budget surplus for Radio One development

  • From DCRTV:

      WAMU’s Diane Rehm picks up a CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield Palliative Care Award from the Greater Washington Partnership For Palliative And End-of-Life Care. For a January 2007 interview with author Calvin Trillin concerning “About Alice.” The award will be presented tonight during a reception at DC’s Sibley Hospital…..

  • In a recent online chat, Going Out Gurus took “a moment to remember Tom Terrell, the critic, promoter and DJ, who passed away last week after a long battle with prostate cancer.”

  • Public Eye reports, “You probably don’t know this, but there was yet another presidential debate the other day. You didn’t see it. But don’t feel bad — not that you would — but nobody saw it. It was on National Public Radio. And the reviews have been positive, save for the little ‘it put me to sleep’ factor. But all the plaudits got this writer thinking how you could repackage the debate, draw a crowd and inform a potentially large size of the electorate.”

    WEST WING REPORTAGE

  • Texas Monthly interviews Dan Bartlett.

  • The New York Post reports, Karl Rove, the controversial and long-time senior adviser to President George W. Bush, is shopping a memoir in an auction that will kick off today and likely result in a seven-figure payday.”

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    REVOLVING DOOR

  • A tipster tells us that the new Communications Director for Rep. Brian Baird is Rachel Irwin, former Maine Press Secretary for Senator Olympia Snowe.

  • Maura Judkis is the newest addition to U.S. News as a web producer. “She will be working closely with Ben Harder on the new Science site and with Sara Clarke on the Money & Business site.”

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    JOBS

  • Nationaly Syndicated Radio is looking for Top level support staff.

  • National Journal is looking for a Staff Correspondent.

  • Regent University is seeking a Journalism Professor for Interactive Journalism program.

  • AARP is looking for a Multimedia Producer and a Daily News Editor.

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    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Morning Reading List, 10.24.07

    morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • You think global warming is no big deal.

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-fourth time in twenty-six weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the #1 evening newscast among Adults 25-54. The ABC broadcast averaged a 2.1/9 and 2.58 million among key demo viewers, outperforming NBC’s ‘Nightly News’ by 70,000 for the week. This marks ABC’s best demo performance in five months (w/o 5/14/07). Among Total Viewers, ‘World News’ posted its highest delivery in nearly six months (w/o 4/23/07), averaging 8.1 million to NBC’s 8.2 million. The ABC broadcast also placed first among Households (5.7/12), tying NBC for the week.”

  • Matthew Felling on “The Drudge Effect.”
  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast, winning the week of October 15-19, 2007. The NBC broadcast has now won for two straight weeks and for three of the last four weeks.”

  • Wall Street Journal reports, “In an era when commercial radio seems to be floundering, National Public Radio is hitting its stride. Some 25.5 million people tune into its programming each week, up from 13 million a decade ago. It has more than 800 member stations, up from 635 a decade ago. … Much of this growth has occurred under Ken Stern, NPR’s chief executive, who joined as executive vice president in 1999.”

  • Is The Washington Post into wife swapping? His Extreme-ness explains.

  • Tell Media Matters what you think. Take their survey here.

  • Baltimore Business Journal reports, “Senior citizens living in Europe and the Middle East will soon be able to watch shows produced for elderly audiences by Retirement Living TV, thanks to two new international deals expected to be unveiled this week. The television network, owned and operated by Catonsville-based Erickson Retirement Communities, signed it’s first international programming deal Monday with Anarey Communication’s Health Channel in Israel to air three of its feature shows. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.”

  • Commonwealth Times reports, “Jackie Jones, a former editor for The Washington Post, has spent her career working at more than 11 news services, but she tells VCU students not to resent small beginnings. … Jones came to VCU after she was awarded the 2007 Virginius Dabney Distinguished Professorship.”

  • USA Today offers an excerpt from Cathie Black’s Basic Black, “a thoughtful book on achieving success and balance in life. … Black, 63, oversees 19 magazines in the USA and 200 publications internationally — including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping,Esquire and Harper’s Bazaar — as president of Hearst Magazines.”

  • “NPR to Self: Ixnay on the ‘Ixnay’

  • TVNewser reports, “If you were watching Fox News Channel this weekend then you noticed some programming changes. FNC SVP Bill Shine tells TVNewser he’s just ‘tweaking’ the schedule to see what works. Shine says being ‘in the middle of the NFL season’ is a good time to try out new anchors and new programs.”

  • Huffington Post’s Jason Linkins writes, “NYT Misses True Nature of Clinton-Drudge Relationship”

  • DCRTV points us to this release, announcing “The District of Columbia’s Office of Cable Television and Telecommunications has been officially renamed the DC Office of Cable Television, as set forth in an Administrative Order signed and released by Mayor Adrian M. Fenty.”

  • Bassam Sebti writes in the Washington Post, “What I Risked as an Iraqi Journalist”

  • Inside Cable News reports, “GretaWire blogs about her first interviews with Laura Bush as she follows the First Lady around the Middle East/Africa…”

  • AdAge reports, “HuffPo Will Lose a Lot More Than Money If It Doesn’t Pay Talent”

  • PR Week talks to Paul Pendergrass, “a self-described ‘lifetime flack,’ had a career working for Coca-Cola in almost all facets of communications in the US, Europe, and South Africa before opening his own consultancy in Atlanta in 2001.”

  • As of yesterday, “NPR’s The Bryant Part Project will take a look at nuclear power through a unique multimedia series — including four days of interviews and reports on the radio show and video and interactive features and discussions online.” For the full schedule, click here.

  • New York Post reports, “Another longtime publishing executive is exiting Time Inc. David Morris, who has been the publisher of Entertainment Weekly, is leaving the company after 21 years. The magazine will be swept under a new umbrella group called the Time Inc. Entertainment Group.”

  • ABC announced, “ABC News’ Chief Investigative Correspondent Brian Ross and the Investigative Unit have received the 2007 Online News Association Journalism Award for their reporting on the Mark Foley Congressional Page scandal on the Investigative Unit’s web page, ‘The Blotter,’ the Online News Association and the University of Southern California’s Annenberg School of Communications announced Friday.”

  • Reuters reports, “MediaNews Group Inc said on Monday that Hearst Corp bought a stake in the company for $317 million as part of a complex deal between the two privately held publishers involving several San Francisco-area.”

  • The Houston Chronicle reports, “The Houston Chronicle is cutting about 5 percent of its work force through layoffs and the elimination of open positions as it restructures the operations of the newspaper, Publisher and President Jack Sweeney said Monday. Approximately 70 employees will be affected by the changes.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “AOL, Time Warner Inc.’s Internet unit, is introducing wireless services to entice some of its 114 million monthly U.S. online visitors to access the company’s Web sites with their mobile phones.”

  • Campaign Standard reports on “a controversy brewing inside the Beltway.”

  • Poynter Online reports, “When Beijing was appointed to host the 2008 Olympic Games, it promised that foreign media would have the same ability to report as in previous Olympics; no less, no more. … Simply delivering on China’s original promise is hard enough, I was told by an insider of one of the larger news operations, because of the way this country is organized. This person’s news organization is bringing in hundreds of reporters, and it wants to broadcast from over 100 locations in China — just as like it did for Olympics in other nations.”

  • Check out Right-Wing Facebook, launched by People for the American Way and RightWingWatch.org.

  • Los Angeles Times reports, “Bernstein makes first visit to Nixon Library”

  • Sacramento Bee reports, “The last lingering detail of a complicated $1 billion newspaper sale by The McClatchy Co. has been wrapped up. Hearst Corp. has paid $317 million for a stake in Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc., according to a regulatory filing.”

  • On Plame’s book, The New York Times writes, “Her Identity Revealed, Her Story Expurgated”

  • Wonkette reports, “That’s ostensible born-again Christian Tom DeLay and ostentatious, drunken God-hater Christopher Hitchens making nice with each other at the Hill’s book fair last week!”

  • TVNewser reports, “Up against baseball, football, and some desperate housewives, FNC’s GOP debate in Orlando Sunday night pulled in a respectable 2,462,000 total viewers (live + same day), and 773,000 in the A25-54 demo.”

  • Romenesko reports, “From Joseph N. DiStefano, Philadelphia Inquirer: Knight Ridder did develop a plan to consolidate copy desks into a few regional centers, according to newspaper executives I talked to when I was covering the company in 2005-2006.”

  • McClatchy reports, “American taxpayers are helping to foot the bill so foreign writers can savor California wine. Subsidized by the Agriculture Department and the wineries, the writers from Canada, Europe and Asia tour some of this country’s most renowned wine regions, and winemakers say their stories boost foreign sales. Lawmakers agree, and they want to increase funding in the new farm bill that senators will consider next week.”

  • From The New York Observer: “Analyzing Bill Keller Analyzing War and Peace”

  • The Sacramento Bee reports, “Serious philosophers make the case that Jon Stewart is the Socrates of our day”

  • B&C reports, “Presidential candidate and Illinois Democratic Sen. Barack Obama wants Federal Communications Commission chairman Kevin Martin to take a series of intermediary steps before making the leap to rewrite media-ownership rules, saying that not to do so would be irresponsible.”

  • Reuters reports, “The New York Times Co reported a 6.7 percent rise in profit on Tuesday because of higher national advertising sales and a price increase for its flagship newspaper, sending its shares up as much as 8 percent.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein announced today that J. William Leonard, Director of the Information Security Oversight Office, who will be retiring from the post at year’s end, has agreed to become Senior Counselor to the Archivist beginning in January 2008.”

  • The Press Gazette reports, “Reuters has said that it is working with Nokia on a project that could ‘transform the way journalists file news reports on the move’. It is a new mobile application which the agency said is ‘a lightweight toolkit that provides everything journalists need to file and publish stories from even the most remote regions of the world.’”

  • New York Post reports, “American Heritage will rise again. Edwin S. Grosvenor has purchased the magazine, Web site and book division from the Forbes family with plans to resume publication with a December/January issue. The deal is for $500,000 in cash and the assumption of about $10 million in subscription liabilities, putting the deal’s total value at around $11 million.”

  • “This Wednesday evening at 6:30 PM, October 24, Martin Luther King, III, CEO of Realizing The Dream Foundation and AmericanLife TV Network (www.americanlifetv.com) will be hosting a reception and screening of the documentary ‘Poverty in America’. Reporter Nick Clooney and Representatives Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), John Lewis (D-Ga.) and Bruce Braley (D-Iowa) will also be in attendance.”

  • Reuters reports, “Comcast Corp said on Monday that file transfers on peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent may be delayed by bandwidth management technology, but it denied blocking access to any applications or content.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., owner of the world’s most popular search engine, offered to preserve some business practices at DoubleClick Inc. in a bid to win antitrust approval for its proposed $3.1 billion purchase of the company.”

  • Wired Magazine talks to James Murdoch “on Satellite TV, His Google Deal, and What Mogul Means”

  • Washington Times praises Fox’s Chris Wallace for his job as moderator during last weekend’s debate.

  • CNN announced in a release yesterday, “For her services to journalism, Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s chief international correspondent, today was awarded a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Queen Elizabeth II.”

  • Check out “Deborah Kanafani, Author of Unveiled and mb Instructor, on Writing Controversial Nonfiction vs. Controversial Memoir.”

  • A release announced, “Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein and Wayne Metcalfe, vice president of the Genealogical Society of Utah, … announced a five-year partnership agreement to digitize case files of approved pension applications of widows of Civil War Union soldiers from the National Archives.”

  • Philadelphia Inquirer reports, “As moderator of Meet the Press, Tim Russert is the one who usually asks the tough questions. That role was reversed yesterday at the Gesu School in North Philadelphia. Russert chatted with eighth graders at the independent school, touching on the 2008 presidential election, before accepting the Magis Spirit Award for his support of Gesu and other local Jesuit ministries at a ceremony in the cozy first-floor library.”

  • TVNewser reports,Rush Limbaugh Gushes Over Erin Burnett

  • “This headline’s on the Post’s politics Web page. Well, has anyone ever seen them together in the same place at the same time? There’s only one way to find the truth: Look up Rudy’s skirt,” Wonkette suggests.

  • Inside Cable News writes,Mika Brzezinski: The next Andrea Mitchell?”

  • East West Magazine reports on the Dalhi Lama’s appearance in D.C. last week. “In closing remarks, the Dalai Lama pointed to the cameras in the back of the room where dozens upon dozens of the press gathered and said that the media has the role to educate and change society without ‘preaching’ and that education is a key to provoke positive change. “India, the Indian constitution is not a rejection of religion…it respects all beliefs, all equal…this interpretation, this inclusive secular way of education is very, very important.’”

  • A release announced, “Danny Heitman is the winner of the second annual In Character Prize for editorial and opinion writing about the human virtues, presented at an October 18th ceremony at New York City’s Yale Club. The Louisiana-native won the $10,000 prize for his essay ‘Daily Thanksgiving is Worth the Work,’ originally published in the November 22, 2006 edition of the Christian Science Monitor (also the publisher of last year’s winning essay).”

  • A USAToday release announced, “USATODAY.com announces the launch of five new widgets to its site, widgets.USATODAY.com. This second round of widgets will roll out through mid-November. Originally launched on Sept. 4, 2007, USATODAY.com’s widgets provide another way for consumers to experience and share news and information online in the manner that is most convenient to them. Users can use widgets to incorporate some of the most popular features of USATODAY.com on their blog, web page or social network.”

  • “In this month’s new and improved Video Pitch Slam 1-on-1, three hopeful writers pitch Blender editor-in-chief Craig Marks on camera with stories ranging from the music scene at the South Pole to a closing time anthem. The mag’s wide open to feature stories — for specifics, see our How to Pitch: Blender article — so keep watching to see if Craig buys anyone’s story.”

  • Media Matters’ Eric Boehlert writes, “Reading The New York Times’ coverage of the conservative Values Voter Summit held in Washington, D.C., this past weekend, where Republican presidential contenders paraded before evangelical activists, it was clear who the Times thought was the star of the event: Rudy Giuliani.”

  • Wonkette reports, “Today’s Washington Post crossword features an unusually meta pair of consecutive clues (16-and 17-Across). We’re anxious to see if the sudoku world will respond by encoding the 1 through 9 matrix to make fun of Oral Roberts.”

  • New York Times opines, “The administration’s distaste for a federal shield bill — and its claims that it threatens national security — should be seen as just another extension of its obsession with secrecy.”
  • You may have noticed that CNN’s logo has gone from red to green in honor of Planet in Peril, which aired last night and tonight from 9-11 ET.

  • Check out The memeorandum Leaderboard which “lists the sources most frequently posted to memeorandum.”

  • B&C reports, “CBS said it didn’t take any remedial action after the Federal Communications Commission found drama Without a Trace indecent back in 2006, saying it didn’t think it had to.”

  • Blogging on The Huffington Post, Valerie Plame writes, “I just learned the other day that my scheduled Tuesday appearance on the Charlie Rose show has been canceled. The show’s producer said it was because Charlie Rose wanted to prepare for an appearance next week by CIA Director General Michael Hayden. How ironic is that? I could have told Mr. Rose a few things about General Hayden, but I’m sure he’ll do a fine job with his interview questions without me.”

  • TVNewser reports, “Countdown with Keith Olbermann won the 8pmET hour in the A25-45 demo Friday night topping The O’Reilly Factor by 25,000 viewers (live+ same day). Bill O’Reilly still had the #1 program in total viewers with 1.4M, more than doubling Olbermann’s audience. O’Reilly was anchoring, but it was a previously aired program (Oct. 9).”

    Jobs

  • The McGraw-Hill Companies is looking for a Legal Correspondent.

  • Modern Luxury Media, LLC is looking for an Advertising Account Executive.

  • A National Consumer Magazine is looking for a Sales Representative-D.C., Philly, Baltimore.

  • The Gazette/Comprint Military is looking for a Reporter.

  • Voice of America is seeking a Senior TV Production Specialist.

  • CNSNews.com is looking for a Reporter.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext