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Posts Tagged ‘Ross Douthat’

Weekend Show Preview, 4.4 – 4.6

SundayShows12Who’s on the talk shows this weekend? Glad you asked:

Sunday:

CBS’s “Face the Nation”: Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), Dan Pfeiffer, Thomas Friedman of Showtime’s “Years of Living Dangerously,” Heidi Cullen, Chief Climate Advisor for “Years,”  Todd Purdum of Politico, Amy Walter of Cook Political Report, John Dickerson of CBS

“Fox News Sunday”: Rep. Michael McCaul (R-TX), Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA), Gen. Michael Hayden, Brit Hume, Elise Viebeck of The Hill, Liz Cheney, Juan Williams

NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Fmr. Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Mike Mullen, Shaun McCutcheon, Robert Weissman of Public Citizen, Kathleen Parker of WaPo, Fmr. Sen. John Sununu (R-NH), Fmr. Rep. Harold Ford Jr. (D-TN), Steve Case of America Online, author Michael Lewis, Kevin Tibbles of NBC, 

ABC’s “This Week“: Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Rep. John Carter (R-TX), Gen. Peter Chiarelli, Donna Brazile, Newt Gingrich, Bill Kristol, Alicia Menendez of Fusion

Univision’s “Al Punto”: Rep. Joe García (D-FL), activists Jaime Valdez and Marisa Franco, radio host Fernando Espuelas, activists Jersey Vargas and Mario Vargas

CNN’s “State of the Union“: 9:00- Rep. Nancy Pelosi (R-CA), Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI), Rep. Dutch Ruppersberg (D-MD), Kitty Higgins from  NTSB, Nick Sabatini from FAA, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI), Rep. Tim Murphy (R-PA); 12:00- Penny Lee of Democratic Governors Assoc., Ross Douthat of NYT, Corey Dade of NPR, satellite expert Ken Christensen, pilot Karlene Petit

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Mediabistro Course

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot CampDevelop a plan for your book's success in our brand new online boot camp, Book Promotion & Publicity! Starting July 10, publishing and public relations experts will teach you the publicity skills needed to ensure a successful book launch, such as, how to create a social media kit, interact with fans and authors on panels, create a marketing newsletter and more! Register now! 
 

Weekend Show Preview, 2.28 – 3.2

SundayShows12Who’s on the public affairs shows this weekend? Glad you asked:

Sunday:

CBS’s “Face the Nation“: Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand‎ (D-NY), Michael O’Hanlon of Brookings, Danielle Pletka of AEI, CBS’ Margaret Brennan and David Martin

“Fox News Sunday”: Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA), Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH), Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), George Will, Elise Viebeck of The Hill, Scott Brown, Evan Bayh

NBC’s “Meet the Press“: Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-GA), Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Kathleen Parker, Tina Brown, Rep. Raúl Labrador (R-ID), Chuck Todd of NBC/MSNBC

ABC’s “This Week“: Ben Affleck, Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL), CNN’s Van Jones, Rich Lowry of National Review, ABC’s Cokie Roberts, Nate Silver

Univision’s “Al Punto” : President of Mexico Enrique Peña Nieto, Michelle Obama, wife of a Venezuelan political prisoner Lilian Tintori, Roni Kaplan of Israeli Defense Force, actor Eduardo Verastegui

CNN’s “State of the Union“: Rick Santorum, Former WH Deputy Press Sec. Bill Burton, NYT‘s Ross Douthat, Amy Walter of Cook Political Report

More guest listings after the jump…

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Politico Upset About ‘Bowel Movements’

Ex-Politico scribe Steve Friess‘s BuzzFeed freelance debut has some Politico reporters bristling in response. Damn that BuzzFeed is stirring up so much trouble as of late.

Friess, who just finished up at Politico last week as a tech reporter, wrote a counter piece to NYT columnist Ross Douthat, who declared that in order for WaPo to succeed Politico has to fail. Friess took issue, saying there is a place for Politico‘s niche reporting and WaPo must find its own way, irregardless of Politico‘s success. His point: WaPo can’t be Politico and shouldn’t try as they’re meant to serve a broader audience. He wrote, “The Post’s mission and mandate is to serve an entire and diverse community; Politico’s is to serve a homogenous and specialized one.”

The line that offended reporters such as Politico‘s Maggie Haberman and Ken Vogel? “Ross Douthat of The New York Times kicked this parlor game into high gear on Sunday by declaring the Post’s fatal sin as an alleged failure to fully embrace the internet and deploy the sort of kinetic, report-every-bowel-movement coverage of official Washington that has turned Politico into a juggernaut,” wrote Friess. He also wrote that Politico wasn’t profitable until a few years ago when they launched Politico Pro, calling other parts of the publication the “dessert” that created the brand while Politico Pro is the vegetables that feed their bottom line. He also revealed other vanilla details about Politico newsroom parlance, but nothing all that harsh.

Still, after getting flack about his story, Friess took to Twitter: “Amused that ex-colleagues see @BuzzFeed piece as insult. It’s in no way critical of @politico.” Haberman retweeted that with, “Seriously??” Vogel also retweeted, adding, “report-every-bowel-movment.”

VOGEL: “Comparing our journalism to covering ‘bowel movements’ isn’t criticism? Fine to criticize, of course, but own it when you do.”

FRIESS: “Ask any journalist in Las Vegas who followed my blog if I’m shy about owning my own criticism. There’s none in that piece. …That’s colorful writing, not criticism. I’m repeatedly admiring & complimentary of @politico. It’s just different than a newspapr. … Believe me. When I do, I will. But obsessing on a phrase at the expense of an entire piece is… well… very Politico of you.”

VOGEL: “Which is not criticism either, right?”

FRIESS: “Naw. That’s just trolling. You need to brush up on your lingo.”

VOGEL: “Thanks for your advice and insight.”

Indeed there were compliments for his old employer in his piece. For instance, “Politico is a niche publication that does a terrific job focusing on a topic of great and growing interest. But it does not pretend to want to cover all of the myriad and important topics that a general-service newspaper does, nor should it.”

Friess directly disputes Douthat’s premise that WaPo wins if Politico loses, writing, “But we already have a Politico, and it’s a good thing. If the Post becomes Politico, we all lose.”

Asked for comment on the matter, Friess told FishbowlDC… Read more

Afternoon Reading List 08.14.13.

WaPo can’t be Politico and shouldn’t try, says ex-Politico writer — The recent sale of WaPo to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has sparked a lot of analysis of why the newspaper’s profits have slumped. But in a piece for BuzzFeed, Steve Friess   — who left Politico just last Friday after writing for Politico Pro –  argues that much of that analysis has been misguided and that “if the Washington Post becomes Politico we all lose.” Friess, who was a senior reporter for the publication, is careful not to burn bridges despite what the subhead says: “A recently departed Politico reporter on why The Washington Post should steer clear of his old employer’s model.” He writes that Politico has been profitable because of their very close coverage of a niche, and that most of the profits come from Politico Pro. WaPo, on the other hand, must focus on a broader array of coverage and couldn’t make a revenue if it took to Politico’s model. Friess cited analysis from NYT’s Ross Douthat that WaPo’s “fatal sin is an alleged failure to fully embrace to internet and deploy the sort of kinetic, report-ever-bowel-movement coverage of official Washington that has turned Politico into a juggernaut.” He argues that there’s a market for both, but WaPo needs to be itself, not Politico.

Why you should read it: There’s been a lot of coverage of the WaPo sale, and Friess puts a compelling argument that goes against the grain of popular analysis of the sale.

What can Bezos do? WaPo doesn’t get sold every day, so we’re going with another look at the sale to finish off today’s reading list. Though it doesn’t happen often, WaPo has changed hands before. And, TNR’s Todd Gitlin reports, the newest owner may “figure out not only how to get people to read journalism but how to create it somewhat afresh. Or he may take one or another low road.” Gitlin offers no solution, but says WaPo’s woes “will not be reversed if new money tries to do more of what the old money failed to do successfully–retrench and shift digital.”

Why you should read it: Gitlin offers not just insight into Bezos takeover of the paper but puts it in context with past sales and acquisitions by other tech billionaires.

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Douthat Clarifies That He Really, Really Doesn’t Care For Politico

Yesterday, we pointed out how NYT columnist Ross Douthat feels about Politico.

He was blunt in his distaste: “I say this as someone who doesn’t particularly like the Politico style or the role it plays in our gilded capital,” he wrote in his Sunday column the New York Times, all while noting he misses the WaPo that could’ve been, if only WaPo hadn’t stopped being a good newspaper.

Just in case you had doubt though, Douthat goes a step further today and tells us how he really feels about Politico.

“…the founders of Politico created a publication that can often feel as solipsistic,  trivial, and insufferable as the cloistered world it’s writing about…”

Solipsistic, trivial and insufferable.

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NYT’s Douthat Imagines the WaPo That Could’ve Been

How was WaPo “lost” to Jeff Bezos?

The NYT‘s Ross Douthat wrote in his column this weekend that it was because the paper missed its opportunity to seize the internet by the throat. What’s fascinating is Douthat knows exactly when this happened. The moment was “in 2006 when John Harris and Jim VendeHei left … to found Politico.”

He argues that Politico created the political-journalism juggernaut WaPo should’ve and could’ve been, a daily must-read that dominates “the D.C. conversation … that matches the metabolism of the Internet.” There can be only one, and according to Douthat, it’s Politico.

It still gets better. Despite the ass kissing you might think this is at first glance, Douthat doesn’t think so highly of Politico.

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A New Pastime: Butchering Podhoretz’s Name

It might be time for Commentary Editor John Podhoretz to get it over with and legally change his surname. Something with just a few more vowels.

At the National Review Institute summit this weekend, conservatives in media and politics gathered to talk about the future of the Republican Party. Those who participated on the “What is wrong with the Right?” panel on Saturday morning with Podhoretz either worked around having to say his name or completely botched it while trying.

National Review‘s Reihan Salam moderated the panel. While introducing the guests, he noted one John “Pod-hore-ets,” with emphasis on each syllable. “It’s ‘Pud-or-its,’” Podoretz said. Apologizing, Salam tried again: “Pud-hore-ets.”

Recognizing that his own name is difficult to pronounced, Salam thanked Podoretz “for the privilege of letting me butcher someone else’s name.”

MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough also spoke on the panel. Though Podoretz has been a guest on Scarborough’s “Morning Joe” program, it’s a name with which the “Morning Joe” host still struggles. “I won’t try to say his last name because I always butcher it,” Scarborough said.

NYT columnist Ross Douthat had no luck either… Read more

The FishbowlDC Interview With Reason’s Peter Suderman

Say hello to Reason Magazine Associate Editor and TWT movie critic Peter Suderman. Born in Ohio, he and his family moved to North Carolina for a few years, then to the panhandle of Florida – a town called Niceville. Suderman has endured all the “nice” jokes a person can handle and says yes, indeed, it was a “nice” place to come of age, complete with manicured golf courses and palm trees. “It’s very nice,” he says. “Totally nice. You get a lot of Pleasantville references. But sure, it’s a nice place to grow up. It’s near the ocean.” Suderman himself is rather nice, polite — and jumpy. The latter may stem from the large carafe of coffee he consumes daily. He says he couldn’t function without it. On rare occasions that he has tried, he’s consumed by headaches and fatigue. So why try?

We met in Reason‘s gorgeous dimly lit loft-like space off Dupont Circle – we’re on display in a glass enclosed conference room that sits smack in the middle of the office. It’s warm — like an oven. And there are funky aluminum art pieces.

Conversation topics included video games and how he once occupied his time while out of work for three and a half months. Time off involved hours of video games and sometimes sleeping until noon. Favorite movies include Taxi Driver, Fight Club and Blade Runner. Suderman was a pretty serious music geek in high school, he says. Among the instruments he played: Guitar, bass, tuba, flute and baritone.

Prior to Washington, Sudmerman was an editor at the University of North Florida Spinnaker, where he wrote a column and movie reviews and compiled the local entertainment calendar. He spent a couple years writing record reviews for Skyscraper, a music zine for indie-rock obsessives. In 2005 he arrived in Washington — a city it seems he was destined to live — and went to work as Assistant Editorial Director at the Competitive Enterprise Institute. He began writing movie reviews for National Review Online. Soon he became NRO‘s Managing Editor, which involved briefly relocating to NYC.

He happily returned to Washington and hasn’t looked back. “You may not be rich,” he says of journalism, “but you can make a decent career of waking up everyday and reading and writing. I get paid to watch movies. This is not bad.”

If you were a carbonated beverage, which would you be? Ale 8, a difficult-to-find but uniquely tasty Kentucky ginger ale that is the best soda I’ve ever had.

How often do you Google yourself? Google alerts does it continuously for me.

What’s the worst thing you’ve ever said to an editor/boss (or vice versa)? In general, I’m of the opinion that saying terrible things to bosses isn’t a good idea, so I haven’t done much of it. But during my college years, I briefly worked at a chain clothing store. It was tedious and terrible and they would promise to schedule employees one way—and then totally ignore those promises when the schedule was posted. Eventually, I got tired of it and told one of the assistant managers that I wouldn’t be coming in anymore, even though I was supposed to work several more shifts. The response wasn’t exactly friendly. I’ve given notice before quitting every other job I’ve ever worked. But in this case I recall saying something to effect of, “You guys have no respect for my schedule, so why should I have any respect for yours?”

Who is your favorite working journalist and why? It’s impossible to pick one. Obviously, I am a big fan of my wife, Megan McArdle, and all of my colleagues at Reason. But in no particular order, I am also a big fan of: Ross Douthat, Ezra Klein, Philip Klein, Tim Carney, Ryan Lizza, Jonathan Cohn, A.O. Scott, and Anthony Lane. This is an incomplete list, and I’ve surely forgotten to include important people.

What’s your dream job? Aqua Teen Hunger Force voice actor, maybe? Or editor at an awesome libertarian magazine.

Do you have a favorite word? Balderdash?

Top three life moments: Getting married. Meeting my wife for the first time. Making the cover of the local paper dressed up as Obi-Wan Kenobi after seeing Star Wars: The Phantom Menace.

The Earth’s human population is dying out and you must save it. You will spend a romantic evening with either Sec. Janet Napolitano or former AG Janet Reno? Who will it be? (Neither is not an option.) If the fate of humanity hangs in the balance based on one’s commitment to a night between the sheets with one of the Janets, maybe we don’t deserve to survive. But if I can’t say “neither,” and we’re really in an end-times scenario, then I suppose I may as well go for both. Makes for a more entertaining story afterwards, and is probably more likely to accomplish the important productivity goals.

What swear word do you use most often? I mutter “Oh, for fuck’s fucking sake” at least a few times everyday.

To borrow from Politico’s “Answer This” (with a FishbowlDC twist): Picture someone in Washington who you’d like to strangle (if such a thing were legal). Without naming him or her, please describe them in the nude. Just kidding. Tell us what you think of them. I think this person is embarrassing [himself or herself], but it’s sure entertaining to watch.

Who is your favorite Boybander and why? (Ezzy, Hazy, Weigel, Attackerman, Beutler) I like all of them because they’re good journalists and decent people. But I suppose if I have to pick one, I’ll go with Weigel, because I’ve known him almost since I moved to D.C.

When you pig out what do you eat? Tyson’s chicken tenders. (I also eat these when I’m not pigging out.)

What is your absolute favorite item of clothing in your closet? We want the fabric, the brand, the store and the price if possible. If it’s a certain kind of underwear we don’t want to know about it. My various clothing allegiances tend to shift quite a bit from year to year, but since moving to D.C., one constant in my life has been a tweed jacket I got from my dad. I have no idea what brand it is, or what it cost him. But it’s amazingly comfortable, and it kind of looks like an old English prof’s coat left over from his grad school days, likely because it is.

Pick one: Kim, Khloe, or Kourtney? It can’t be an accident that those initials spell K.K.K.

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Fish Food

(A Sprinkling of Things We Think You Ought to Know...)

Narcissism, Weiner and More… In Monday’s NYT op-ed section, Ross Douthat wrote a piece worth reading called “The Online Looking Glass” that might as well have been written pointedly for some Washingtonians. The story instructs that technology affects a person’s character and sometimes for the worse. Take a certain Weiner, who is obscenely well-versed in Social Media. Ross wrote, “In the sad case of Representative Anthony Weiner’s virtual adultery, the Internet era’s defining vice has been thrown into sharp relief. It isn’t lust or smut or infidelity, though online life encourages all three. It’s a desperate, adolescent narcissism.” He later added: “The rituals of social media, it seems, make status-seekers and exhibitionists of us all.” Douthat is an op-ed columnist for NYT, conservative author, a film critic for National Review and formerly a senior editor at The Atlantic. Read the full piece here.

Is Olbermann the real Twitter Moron? Politico‘s Patrick Gavin, in his new gig writing for the publication’s main site, wrote about Current TV Keith Olbermann‘s widely known Twitter fights over the weekend. Gavin says the frequency of Olbermann’s spats may be numbing the shock effect he intends. An example: “’Dear Moron: I had walked in the shoes for a year. I had just increased the run to TWO minutes,’ he wrote to @myfivefingers on the topic of footwear.” Gavin interviewed a psychologist and a number of journos for the piece including Syndicated Columnist and former CNNer Bob Franken and The Daily Caller‘s Editor-in-Chief Tucker Carlson, who thinks Googling yourself is detrimental to your happiness. Read the full story here.

Meet Ann Coulter The Heritage Foundation and WMAL are coming together on June 17 to throw Conservative Commentator and Author Ann Coulter a book party. Her book: Demonic: How the Liberal Mob is Damaging America. The party will transpire on the Heritage Foundation’s rooftop. Coulter will autograph books that you will purchase if you so desire and she’ll field questions from the audience. The party host is Michael Gonzalez, VP of Communications for the Heritage Foundation. WMAL host Mary Katharine Ham, also a video journalist for The Daily Caller, will make a special appearance. Time: 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. News Inquiries: (202) 675-1761.

A Media Reporter’s Guide to CPAC

The agenda for CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Conference happening in D.C. this weekend, has been posted, and journalists and media types are invading.

  • Tucker Carlson, editor-in-chief of The Daily Caller will speak at an event sponsored by Accuracy in Media on Thursday and, later that night, will serve as Master of Ceremonies for CPAC’s Presidential Banquet honoring Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute.
  • S.E. Cupp, a Daily Caller columnist, will sign her book, Losing Our Religion: The Liberal Media’s Attack on Christianity, on Friday before taking part in a Saturday panel for students on how to become a columnist. Also on the panel: The Weekly Standard‘s Fred Barnes and Andrew Ferguson, and NYT‘s Ross Douthat.
  • BigJournalism’s Andrew Breitbart will speak in the main ballroom on Saturday morning, and he’ll be introduced by Townhall‘s Guy Benson.
  • Dana Loesch, also of BigJournalism, will participate in a panel on new media activism along with Matt Sheffield of the Washington Examiner on Thursday.
  • More from the Washington Examiner: Mark Tapscott will be on a panel on Friday morning, Tim Carney will be on another on Friday afternoon, and Michael Barone will be on one Saturday evening. Also on Barone’s panel: John Gizzi of Human Events and FNC contributor Margaret Hoover.
  • Conservative pundit Ann Coulter will speak to CPAC students Friday night along with FNC’s “Red Eye” gang: Greg Gutfeld, Bill Schultz, and Andy Levy before taking the main stage on Saturday, following National Review‘s Jonah Goldberg.
  • Also on different panels (so, so many panels): Human EventsJason Mattera, WaPo‘s Julia Duin (as a moderator. Need a refresher? We had dinner with last week), Quin Hillyer of TWT (also as a moderator), Andrew McCarthy of National Review, and WSJ‘s John Fund.
  • CNN contributor and Red State managing editor Erick Erickson will be the guest of honor at a student luncheon on Friday.
  • CPAC’s 2010 Blogger of the Year Ed Morrissey of HotAir will present this year’s award to Javier Manjarres of The Shark Tank.

FishbowlDC has obtained a press pass, but it doesn’t come with many perks (other than free admission). They’re holding our badge at the Media Check-In desk, so that’s nice of them. Credentialed press “do not necessarily have access” to the CPAC Bloggers’ Lounge according to their e-mail, and we’ve requested several interviews with speakers using CPAC’s guidelines for doing so. No word yet. Stay tuned…

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