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Posts Tagged ‘Rowan Scarborough’

Morning Reading List 06.17.13.

Huma under fire: NYT Vs. Politico –  NYT‘s Raymond Hernandez writes that Huma Abedin, wife of the most ambitious weiner in New York, former Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-Schlongville), did not disclose how much income she earned in her private consultant role while working as a top advisor for Sec. of State Hillary Clinton. The story rolled in last night around 11:31 p.m. (at least according to a @nytimes tweet as there is no time stamp). In graph three, he cites a Thursday afternoon Politico story published at 4:14 p.m. triple bylined by Maggie Haberman, John Bresnahan and Glenn Thrush. Politico reported the special arrangement that Abedin had with the State Department, but did not report that the information was not disclosed on Weiner’s financial disclosure report. They wrote that the information was not publicly available. Abedin declined to speak to the NYC; Politico‘s story never mentions requesting to speak with her. While Hernandez cites longtime Hillary Clinton press aide Philippe Reines and “an associate of Ms. Abedin,” Politico, meanwhile, cited “a source familiar with the arrangement,” “a friend of hers,” “several sources” and “one source.”

White House Scandalpalooza 

Benghazi TimelineRowan Scarborough’s piece in TWT this morning gives an in-depth analysis into the Benghazi scandal. Organized in somewhat of a timeline, the story explains step by step what went wrong from before the attack up until recent weeks when the scandal broke. Read here.

IRS questions unansweredPolitico’s Lauren French and Rachel Bade examine holes in the IRS scandal that have yet to emerge. The piece thoroughly outlines questions the case has left unanswered and why they’re important. Read here.

Scandal ADHD—In a piece in WaPo this morning, Aaron Blake puts the week in scandals involving the IRS, Benghazi, and AP phone records into perspective. Though the scandals have dominated news media this week, not many Americans are paying attention. Read here.

FishbowlDC intern Austin Price contributed to this report.

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Morning Reading List, 08.15.08

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Good morning Washington.

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We’ve got your morning mix of media Muesli after the jump…

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Morning Reading List, 10.17.07

morningsun.gifGood morning Washington.

  • Rowan Scarborough has left the Washington Examiner. He says, “after a stint in the Navy, 30 years at five newspapers and two book, I’m retiring, while eyeing some new projects in 2008.”

  • An NBC release announced, “According to Nielsen Media Research data, ‘NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams’ was the most-watched network evening newscast during the week of October 8-12, 2007.”

  • An ABC release announced, “For the twenty-third time in twenty-five weeks, ‘World News with Charles Gibson’ was the most-watched evening newscast among Adults 25-54.”

  • Reuters reports, “Gossip is more powerful than truth, a study showed on Monday, suggesting people believe what they hear through the grapevine even if they have evidence to the contrary.”

  • Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez doesn’t like reporters either.

  • A release announced, “On Tuesday, October 23, the Woodrow Wilson Center’s Middle East Program will host a debut book launch and discussion with Barbara Slavin, senior diplomatic reporter for USA Today and Jennings Randolph fellow at the U.S. Institute of Peace. Slavin will present Bitter Friends, Bosom Enemies: Iran, the U.S., and the Twisted Path to Confrontation, which builds on her six trips to Iran, from 1996 to 2006, and extensive reporting on U.S. diplomacy toward Iran through the summer of 2007.” For more details, click here.

  • An NPR release announced, “Maria Thomas, who has directed NPR’s digital media activities since 2001 as Vice President and General Manager, Online, has been named Senior Vice President, Digital Media. Thomas is responsible for NPR’s online and on-demand operations as well as its consumer products and e-commerce business and its library and archival activities.”

  • NBC announced, “Tim Russert will moderate a three-hour discussion on energy among leading Republican and Democratic presidential candidates at “Houston’s Presidential Summit” on Nov. 13, 2007, from 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. (EST). The Summit is sponsored by the Greater Houston Partnership. Portions of the event will air live on MSNBC. All three hours of ‘Houston’s Presidential Summit’ will stream live on MSNBC.com.”

  • RCN announced it has launched ESPN360.com and ABC News Now. “As a result, RCN internet customers will have free access to ESPN’s signature, next-generation broadband sports network, as well as interactive ABC TV news programming.”

  • Velvet in Dupont is not fan of The Washington Post and their blog roll.

  • DCist Comments Now Require Registration

  • Don’t forget! The Washington Blogger Meetup October Meetup is today at 7:00 p.m. at RDF. To RSVP, click here.

  • A tipster tells us, “Congress Daily’s Darren Goode got married Saturday night in a ceremony that included Blues Brothers impersonators doing backflips.”

  • Portfolio’s Mixed Media writes, “Page Six didn’t just rip off today’s item about a supposed conflict of interest at The New York Times Book Review — it ripped it off wrong.”

  • The City Paper writes, “If you’ve been assaulted or murdered by somebody of another race, or you’ve assaulted or murdered somebody of another race, Howard Witt is probably on your case. And he’s gonna make you famous. Plainly, nobody in the news business has had a year like Witt, the former City Paper editor. He broke the Jena 6 story with a May article in the Chicago Tribune, where he now heads up the paper’s Southwestern bureau.”

  • Washington Post’s Dan Froomkin writes, “Just what is the relationship like between President Bush and Vice President Cheney? Behind closed doors, who defers to whom? PBS’s ‘Frontline’ documentary series tonight chronicles Cheney’s relentless, secretive and smashingly successful quest to expand executive power.”

  • Talking Radio reports, “Randi Rhodes was mugged on Sunday night on 39th Street and Park Ave, nearby her Manhattan apartment, while she was walking her dog Simon. According to Air America Radio late night host Jon Elliott, Rhodes was beaten up pretty badly, losing several teeth and will probably be off the air for at least the rest of the week. At of late Monday night we have not able to locate any press accounts of the attack and nothing has been posted on the AAR website.”

  • The Washington Post opines, “The Post’s Salih Saif Aldin was committed to reporting the truth from Iraq.”

  • Variety reports, “Katie Couric’s recent trip to Iraq and Syria didn’t light up the ratings — and it certainly didn’t stop speculation over how long she can last in the anchor chair.”

  • New York Times reports, “On the day they had contracted to run advertisements placed by CNBC, two Web sites owned by Dow Jones & Company instead ran ads for that cable business channel’s new competitor, the Fox Business Network.”

  • Portfolio’s Felix Salmon writes, “I do wish that Mark Gimein will start blogging: he’s a natural. He’s provocative, and interesting, and – at least until the final entry of his guest-blogging stint at Time – unafraid to write long. (This is your own place, Mark! If you want to write long, feel free!) But he has a vision of ‘online journalism bifurcat[ing] into reporting and commentary’, with blogging in the latter category and serious journalism in the former.”

  • His Extreme-ness writes, “It’s no secret that Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen has never met a personal pronoun he didn’t like.”

  • The PEJ News Coverage Index for the week of October 7-12 shows, “last week was actually unusual in that three frightening stories of random violence generated coverage-with two making the top-10 story list. Plus, the media are all over Fred Thompson’s debate debut.”

  • JibJab, “is now offering its audience a chance to star in their very own JibJab movie. The videos, entitled ‘Night of the Living Democrats’ and ‘Night of the Living Republicans’, are comedic spins on the horror classic, ‘Night of the Living Dead’. They are available here.

  • TVNewser reports, “FNC’s Greta Van Susteren appears in the documentary ‘Girl 27,’ now on DVD. Director David Stenn used Van Susteren to bring a contemporary slant to a decades-old Hollywood scandal.”

  • Patti Shea announced that the next issue of Voice of the Hill will be her last issue as managing editor. “I was offered a job at AARP to do editorial work for their website and it was too good to pass up.”

  • Poynter Online’s Rich Gordan writes, “We shouldn’t let the backlash to Roy Peter Clark’s article Your Duty to Read the Paper let us miss the fact that he diagnosed a real and important problem: The economic model of print newspapers is falling apart and is not being replaced online.”

  • Folio reports, “Given the often-beleaguered state of print advertising, any increase should be considered good news, so this news should thrill consumer magazine publishers: the Magazine Publishers of America’s Publishers Information Bureau is reporting that total rate-card-reported advertising revenue increased 5.6 percent for the first nine months of 2007 when compared to the same period last year. Total ad pages, however, dipped one percent over the same period.”

  • News.com.au reports, “Conaumers who get their news from the internet are likely to trust a blog for reliability as much as a mainstream media site, the competition watchdog said.”

  • Canada.com reports, “Electronic media saturation is leaving Canadian families time-crunched, over-stimulated and virtual strangers in their own homes, according to a new report from the Vanier Institute of the Family.”

  • A Reporters Without Borders release announced, “Bloggers now threatened as much as journalists in traditional media,”according to the new worldwide press freedom index.

  • Washingtonpost.com announced “the launch of its new Shopping section featuring comprehensive local listings of new and used products, including local coupons and promotions, and a national price comparison search powered by Become.com, the online shopping site that integrates product-focused Web search with comparison shopping.” Check it out here.

  • Washingtonpost.com also launched a special feature package on health insurance.

  • TVNewer has the details of “CNN’s America Votes 2008.”

  • We hear that The Washington Examiner was victorious at the 1st annual softball challenge against the Baltimore Examiner team, with a 22-15 run score.

  • MinOnline reports, “But the best way to make friends in a virtual social environment is to give the cool kids the tools that make them seem, well, cooler. An interesting Facebook experiment from CondéNet is already demonstrating this party principle. It just started building Facebook apps that let users shout out what they are wearing now and find and show the recipes they are consulting.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Google Inc., seeking to avoid additional copyright lawsuits, introduced technology for its YouTube video-sharing site that flags clips posted by users who don’t own the content.”

  • TheStreet.com reports, “News of more layoffs at AOL came as no surprise on Wall Street, where recent setbacks for the beleaguered Web concern have convinced many investors that its media-giant parent, Time Warner, needs to get rid of the business.”

  • Reuters reports, Rupert Murdoch’s Fox Business Network made its debut on Monday, seeking to broaden the business news audience with interviews with Hillary Clinton, Alan Greenspan and Richard Branson, but initial reactions were lukewarm.”

  • Newsday reports, “How much is Cablevision Systems Corp. — the owner of the Knicks, Rangers, Madison Square Garden and Radio City Music Hall — really worth? Maybe more than the $22 billion the founding Dolan family is willing to pay to take the company private, according several shareholders and advisory companies. The total includes the $10.6-billion purchase price and the assumption of debt.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “Broadcasters plan to spend $697 million to educate television viewers about a shift in 2009 to digital broadcasting. Members of the National Association of Broadcasters, including the major television networks, will participate in the campaign, the Washington-based trade group said today in a statement distributed by e-mail.”

  • New York Times’ TV Decoder reports, “The ‘big four’ television networks are continuing to lose audience share. Nielsen Media Research released the ‘live plus seven day’ ratings for premiere week today. The numbers include seven days of DVR playback and show that DVRs are stopping some, but not all, of the viewership erosion.”

  • Multichannel.com reports, “Nearly 16% of American households who use the Internet watch television broadcasts online, according to a report released Monday by The Conference Board and TNS.”

  • San Francisco Chronicle reports, “Seventy percent of the 18- to 34-year-olds watching Current TV are noodling around on their laptops at the same time.”

  • Providence Journal reports, “The independent newspaper company that Belo Corp., of Texas, plans to establish early next year could have one of the most robust balance sheets in the business. But the company — of which the Providence Journal is to be part — would continue to face problems that bedevil the traditional media industry, including a general slump in advertising revenue and a continuing shift by consumers to the Internet.”

  • Bloomberg reports, “McClatchy Co., the publisher of 31 daily newspapers including the Miami Herald, said third-quarter profit fell 55 percent as shrinking U.S. home sales cut real estate advertising. The stock fell to its lowest since 1996.”

  • Check out The Board, “a new blog, written by members of the New York Times editorial board.”

  • TVNewser reports, “With the impending return of Don Imus to the radio airwaves, (first reported yesterday on Drudge Report) the talker who replaced him, and the one who may be replaced, are talking. HuffPost’s Rachel Sklar has the clip from Morning Joe.”

  • Media Matter’s Eric Boehlert writes, “Between Michelle Malkin Swift Boating a traumatically injured 12-year-old boy, Rush Limbaugh denigrating anti-war veterans, and Bill O’Reilly insulting black Americans (not to mention Ann Coulter dissing Jews), the mighty right-wing media machine — firmly attached to the hip of the Republican Party — is in the process of driving American conservatism right off a cliff.”

  • Reuters reports, “E.W. Scripps Co said on Tuesday that it would split itself into two publicly traded companies, the second U.S. newspaper publisher and broadcaster in a month to break apart in a bid to boost its market value. Shares of the company rose nearly.”

  • Bmighty.com reports, “The Conference Board says that this year, more people looked for jobs online in the newspaper — 73% to 65%. Just two years ago, those percentages were pretty much reversed.”

    Jobs

  • American University-WAMU 88.5 FM is looking for an experienced Radio Producer for The Kojo Nnamdi Show.

  • Thompson Publishing Group is looking for an Experienced Editor.

  • National Journal Group is looking for a Staff Writer — The Hotline.
  • The Altavista Journal is looking for an Editor.

    Hat Tips: DCRTV, TVNewser, IWantMedia, Romenesko, MediaBistro, JournalismJobs, JournalismNext

  • Rowan Scarborough: #1 In Line

    Washington Examiner National Security Correspondent Rowan Scarborough apparently was the first customer when Eastern Market’s East Hall recently reopened.

    From Hill Rag:

      When Rowan Scarborough reached into his pocket just after 10AM and paid $27.45 for his purchase of an aged New York strip and ground beef from Bill Glasgow’s Union Meat Company, he became the first customer in a new time, what is being called the Market Miracle.

    Strong Washington Times Web Traffic

    We linked to this Top 30 list of February newspaper website traffic earlier, but overlooked this one fact: The Washington Times, whose newspaper circulation doesn’t crack the top 100 nationally, makes this Top 30 list, suggesting that their web presence is much stronger than their print edition impact. And the fact that their website design is rather basic (in fact, they still have printed that Rowan Scarborough works there because of tool problem that they’re trying to fix…), makes their spot on that list even more impressive.