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Dorian

NYT Managing Ed Learns From A 29-Year-Old

The first part of the panel last night on “How Newspapers Can Survive, and Thrive, In the 21st Century” at Columbia’s journalism school was essentially a retread of Robert Kuttner‘s Columbia Journalism Review piece about how newspapers are not dead yet despite the digital onslaught. Then he and others on the panel (save, perhaps, WashingtonPost.com’s Jim Brady) showed their struggles with many things digital.

“I find it curious that nobody has yet done a serous Web daily,” Kuttner said, which made us wonder about what he considers Slate or Salon, or MSNBC.com or CNN.com or the Politico or …

New York Times managing editor Jill Abramson seemed positively astounded by the idea of learning from a 29-year-old in her newsroom. “I found myself last week in the improbable position of creating a politics wiki. I probably didn’t know a year ago what a wiki was.” And she acknowledged she didn’t get the whole Arthur Sulzbergerplatform-agnostic” spiel at first, but now the “sense of excitement is palpable” over digital media there.

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Off the Media: Gates v. Garfield v. Blogosphere

“On the Media” co-host Bob Garfield this week asks America’s-richest-man, philanthropist and future thinker Bill Gates what we’ve all wanted to know: What do you think of those Mac ads on TV that make you look really doofy? “But it’s you!” Garfield quips, when Gates refuses to talk about “another company’s” ads. Evidently, not everyone got the point, and Garfield at three in the morning found himself writing a response to a commentary about what a publicity hungry hound he is. That’s almost too meta for us.

Meanwhile, laughter was heard over this script that was cleverly written in the passive voice in which good fun was made of the Administration’s — any administration’s — inability to say “Yep, we did it — sorry,” and instead say that “mistakes were made.” (Though Clinton never did say “Sex was had with that woman” — and Garfield notes that all his examples are from Republicans — we bet a few slippery Democratic examples could have been found.)

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It’s Official: Eva Dillon Leaves Condé for Readers Digest

evadillon.jpgIf you have a Reader’s Digest email, that means you’re working for Reader’s Digest, right?

Mary Berner, setting up her team at Reader’s Digest, has been poaching people from Condé Nast, her old stomping grounds when she headed the company’s Fairchild Publications division. (She left after it became clear she’d have to report lower down the organizational chart than she’d been used to.)

One Condé exec who’d been rumored on her way was Cookie publisher Eva Dillon. When we emailed Eva today, we got back an “out of office” message saying:

“I am no longer at this email address. If you wish to contact me, please email EVA’S NEW EMAIL@rd.com” [address removed]

Michael Musto: You Have to Play Hard to Get

Ladies, want to know how to get a man? Ask 33 gay men. That’s what Daylle Deanna Schwartz did for her new book, Straight Talk with Gay Guys.

Her promotional video (click above) features Michael Musto, Michael McDerman, Rick Trabucco and other fabulous guys.

The burning questions include:

“Why don’t men know how to give me an orgasm!?”

“Why are men such jerks?”

The advice:

Michael Musto on how to get a man: “You have to play hard to get.”

“Revolve around yourself!”

“If you’re just hounding them all the time, you’re going to drive them away.”

“You’re not his mom.”

“If he’s not what you want, then move on.”

  • Video: Straight Talk With Gay Guys [via YouTube]
  • Off The Media: Urinating Editors

    Did you think we’d forgotten “On the Media”? Nah, we’ve just been a little distracted.

    This week:

  • This joke co-host Brooke Gladstone told didn’t make sense to us until we read it in the transcript:

    A reporter and an editor are going through a desert. They’re really parched. They come upon a pristine pool of water. The reporter jumps right in. The editor, on the other hand, drops his trousers and begins to urinate. And the reporter says, “What are you doing? What are you doing?” And the editor says, “It’s okay, it’s okay. I’m making it better.”

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  • Elle, Men’s Health, Hearst Launch Video Sites

    Brightcove chief and resident genius Jeremy Allaire today gave those at a Magazine Publisher’s Association lunch a little news: Hachette Filipacchi, Hearst and Rodale are all launching video channels with Brightcove. The company, which handles Web video in various ways, is the anti-YouTube, Allaire said — well, not exactly those words, but he said that they come at it from a company-friendly perspective, letting companies control how their videos are used and seen, while YouTube puts the users in complete control. Translation: We’re not going to be sued by Viacom.

    Allaire said Hachette was launching its video initiative with Elle, Rodale with Men’s Health and that Hearst was in a partnership he didn’t much describe.

    For you ad geeks, he said video on the Web gets three levels of ad rates: $30-60 CPM (cost per thousand views) for the high-end, $25-30 for mid-range, and $15-20 for the startups or lesser knowns.

    EARLIER:

  • Viacom Sues YouTube For A Billion
  • Susan Lyne’s Internet Experiment

    Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia CEO and president Susan Lyne told the crowd at the MPA Digital conference that people are now letting their magazine “brands” live online, when they were once wary of associating their crown jewels with a new and “raw” technology. “We’re doing our first totally blended experiment” with new mag Blueprint, she said.

    “The model of launching new magazines is broken,” she continued, with very costly bulk mailings that get maybe three percent of recipients responding. By contrast, two-thirds of people who’ve signed up for Blueprint — a bimonthly that’s been published twice so far with what we’re told is a higher ad rate than flagship Martha Stewart Living — have come in through its Web site.

    Lyne, on a panel with Dennis Publishing CEO Stephen Colvin and moderated by Larry Kramer, said the digital staff at MSO has grown from 25 to some 70 people since the start of the year, and Internet is a “big investment” that, like any of their investments, has to pay off relatively quickly.

    Times‘ Bruni Goes To Penthouse Club For The Meat

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    He may be banned from all 29 Jeffrey Chodorow restaurants, but the Penthouse Club welcomes Frank Bruni with open, uh, arms

    It’s no secret the New York Timesmuch lambasted food critic Frank Bruni is said to be gay. And he’s rather out about it in today’s piece from the Penthouse Club, in which he and some buddies go to sample the steak while, he says, being less susceptible to other pleasures of the flesh. Still, he does sample a desert known as a “buttery nipple”:

    “It involves one of the women straddling your lap, tilting your head back, pouring a combination of Baileys Irish Cream and butterscotch schnapps down your throat, and squirting Reddi-wip into your mouth. It costs $20 in cash. Note to the newspaper’s expense auditors: I don’t have a receipt.”

    Meanwhile, in a review of not food but TV, Virginia Heffernan tells us that American Idol‘s Paula Abdul has a “mom I’d like to sleep with” vibe.

    We’re blushing.

    Martha Stewart Execs Can Take Their Bonuses in Extra Stock

    stewart_lyne.jpgAccording to a filing today with the SEC, Martha Stewart Omnimedia CEO Susan Lyne, CFO Howard Hochhauser and “other designated senior officers” can take up to $100,000 of the bonus they’d be entitled to in stock valued at 15 percent more than the cash would have been.

    They do have to be continuously employed and wait three years to get it all, according to the filing. The stock conversion is valued at $19 per share, the Feb. 21 price, which means they’d lose a bit, according to today’s quoted close of $18.05.

    The idea, of course, is that if they have stock instead of cash, they’ll want to make sure the company performs well for shareholders.

    The full, boring filing details:

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    MPA Digital: Dwell Gets It Wrong — Then Right?

    247_magazines.jpgFishbowlNY reports from the Digital Magazine Conference, “Magazines 24/7,” in New York:

    A couple lessons from Dwell today: On the Web, give lots of choices and be careful how you name your stuff.

    The magazine’s online director, Perry Nelson, stopped by the MPA’s Digital conference this morning to talk about how they messed up on the Web, and hoped their relaunch a week ago would make things better.

    She said their mistakes originally were in thinking their beautiful mod-leaning pictures (which is something Dwell is all about) were enough — without showing their depth and breadth of content. So they went from a static page with, essentially, three ways to enter, to something like 28 links on the homepage, while still preserving their Dwell-y design sensibility.

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