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Matthew Fleischer

Juarez Journalist Sandra Rodríguez Nieto to Win Daniel Pearl Award

El Diario reporter Sandra Rodríguez Nieto will be honored with the Daniel Pearl Award for Courage and Integrity in Journalism at this year’s Southern California Journalism Awards in Los Angeles.

Nieto covered political corruption and drug violence in the Mexican crime capital of Juárez, along the Texas border, for El Diario from 2003 until 2012–during which time two of her colleagues were killed for doing similar reporting.

“I didn’t think a lot about the danger,” she says, ice water, no doubt coursing vigorously through her veins. “I was convinced that my job as a journalist was the most important thing.”

Nieto will accept her award on June 23 in L.A.

Roger Ebert Has Passed Away

Legendary film critic Roger Ebert died today, days after taking a “leave of presence” from his job at the Chicago Sun-Times. More info as it comes in.

*Update: The Sun-Times just posted its obit of Ebert. No real mention of the details of his death, other than that he was 70 years-old and that his passing came after a long battle with cancer.

Ebert reviewed films for the Sun-Times for 46 years. After losing parts of his jaw to cancer in 2006, losing his ability to eat or speak in the process, he somehow managed to become even more relevant by embracing social media. He was one of the few old-school journalists who truly got the brave new world of online media. His nearly 900,000 Twitter followers are a testament to that.

True to form, in his final week, he managed to pen not just one, but two lengthy reviews–one of the Stephanie Meyer adaptation The Host and the other of the indie doc The Iran Job, which played the LA Film Festival last Spring. He gave both two-and-a-half stars. Hopefully he was able to see something he liked a little better before he passed.

RIP.

Slake is Still Alive and Kicking

With founding editors Laurie Ochoa and Joe Donnelly landing jobs at the LA Times and the Santa Barbara start-up Mission and State respectively, the fate of their LA-literary magazine Slake seemed to be in doubt. That was until today, when Donnelly sent around a link to a GOOD magazine grant campaign–which Slake hopes to be the beneficiary of.

Looks like it’s one of those social media, most votes gets the cash deals. So if you want to see Slake in print again, like we do, vote here.

Associated Press Removes the Term ‘Illegal Immigrants’ from its Lexicon–Draws Inevitable Conservative Blowback

The term “illegal immigrant” will no longer be used in Associated Press stories–nor will it appear in its much-copied style book. In a blog post yesterday, AP Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll wrote that “‘illegal’ should describe only an action, such as living in or immigrating to a country illegally.”

The decision, of course, has drawn conservative outrage.

Do we even have to mention what network has been up in arms all day today?

#NewAPStyle is also now a thing on Twitter.

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Los Angeles Picks Up Two Ellie Nominations

Los Angeles magazine continues to earn the attention of the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME)–by earning two nominations for the prestigious ASME Ellie awards yesterday. Los Angeles is a finalist in both the “Personal Service” and “Leisure Interests” categories for its October 2012 package on Plastic Surgery in L.A. and for its November 2012 Food Lover’s Guide To L.A.

National Geographic led all magazines this year with seven Ellie nominations. Winners will be announced May 2.

Full list of finalists after the jump:

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Pacific Standard Makes Two New Web-Friendly Hires

Santa Barbara-based Pacific Standard just announced that Nicholas Jackson, Outside magazine’s former digital director, has taken on the same role at PSmag.com. Jackson was most recently an associate editor at The Atlantic.

While they were at it, Pacific Standard also poached Outside‘s assistant online editor Ryan O’Hanlon, who will serve as the magazine’s new associate editor.

The new hires seem to indicate an Atlantic-like commitment to ratcheting up the mag’s Web content. Which makes sense, since editor Maria Streshinsky came to PS from The Atlantic–where she was credited with bringing the mag back to profitability by helping to institute a Web-centric approach.

OC Register Going Behind a Paywall in April

Following the LA Times‘ lead, the Orange County Register will put its online content behind a paywall starting next month, according to a letter to the paper’s subscribers obtained by OC Weekly. Unlike the Times, however, which allows full online access to Sunday paper subscribers, the Register paywall will be more restrictive.

From the letter:

In April, we will take another promising step to reinforce the value of your subscription by introducing Digital Access. The local content that you access digitally through OCRegister.com is moving to a digital subscription model. Current print subscribers will have free digital access on the days you are subscribed to the print-edition. You simply need to link your account to activate your free Digital Access. In the coming week, we will send a follow-up email with instructions on how to link your account.

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Phil Jackson is on Twitter… Kind Of

Legendary Lakers coach Phil Jackson joined the ranks of the twitterati today. Based on his first and only tweet, it looks like he may have had a stroke while doing so. We here at FishbowlLA want to wish Mr. Jackson a speedy recovery. Or a larger keyboard.

Reporting His New PBS Special Brought Tavis Smiley to Tears

“Education Under Arrest,” the new hour-long PBS special from Tavis Smiley, will make its debut at 8 p.m. tonight. The special will focus on how zero tolerance policies in schools, put into effect after the Columbine massacre, have created a school-to-prison pipeline–expelling children or sending them to jail for offenses as petty as swearing, or chewing gum in class.

We spoke to Smiley last week, and he said this topic had left him emotionally drained in a way he had never experienced before in his more than two decades in the media.

“This is one of the most emotional pieces of work I’ve really done,” he tells FishbowlLA. “This has never happened before, but I had to stop camera at one point because I started crying. We had to take a break. I couldn’t keep it together.”

Smiley says it was the story of Kenyatta and Kennisha–sisters from New Orleans who were expelled from their charter high school for fighting after one was jumped and the other attempted to come to her rescue–that left him particularly raw.

“Both girls end up penalized because there is no gray area for adults to make decisions about these issues. They were both almost perfect 4.0 students. To see these two girls, as bright and full of life as can be, treated in a punitive and pejorative way, I had to stop camera because I started crying.”

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Kerry Eleveld Rejoins The Advocate to Cover Landmark Supreme Court LGBT Cases

Former Advocate Washington correspondent Kerry Eleveld is rejoining the mag as a special correspodent to bolster coverage of the upcoming Supreme Court battles over Prop. 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act.

“We’re very excited to have Kerry Eleveld reporting for us during this crucial moment for LGBT rights,” says Advocate EIC Matthew Breen. “The Supreme Court’s decisions on the Prop. 8 and DOMA cases are going to have lasting effect on the lives of millions of Americans, and Eleveld’s insights into LGBT rights and her history as an award-winning reporter for The Advocate made her an ideal special correspondent to have on the case.”

Eleveld will have her hands full, as oral arguments for both cases are set to begin next week.

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