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Digital

The New Yorker to Launch New Paywall

Beginning July 21, The New Yorker’s content — dating back to 2007 — will be available for all to read online. We suggest you take advantage of this, because in three months, the glossy is closing everything back up; sealed behind a new, metered paywall.

The New York Times reports that the motivation behind opening up newyorker.com was to find out how readers interacted with the site, and then use that data to construct the revamped paywall. The magazine also hopes to add subscribers via the promotion.

We’re excited about this idea, because in the past, it was almost pointless to go to The New Yorker’s site unless you were a subscriber. You never really knew which articles would be available to non-subscribers, and the selection was always minimal.

David Remnick, the magazine’s editor, admitted as much. He told the Times that their method for selecting magazine content that was available online was “awkward” and had “long since outlived its conception.”

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Cosmo Revamps Website

Cosmopolitan.com has received quite a makeover. The site is slicker, faster and cleaner than the old version. Yes, it has the “mobile look” that many people don’t like — featuring the clickable menu in the upper lefthand corner of the page — but Cosmo’s isn’t as clunky as some we’ve seen.

An interesting aspect of the new site is something called “Marketplace,” which is essentially just a collection of sponsored links. By clicking “Best Designer Dresses,” you’re taken to another set of links to the advertisers’ sites. Marketplace is definitely one of the more clever forms of native advertising that we’ve seen.

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Jezebel Staffers Disappointed with New Editor

Jezebel’s incoming editor — Emma Carmichael — doesn’t start until September, but she’s already involved in some drama. According to Capital New York, several of Jezebel’s staffers are upset that Carmichael (who is white) was chosen over Jezebel’s deputy editorDodai Stewart (who is black).

Stewart has been with Jezebel since 2007, and apparently many thought she was the perfect choice to take over the site from Jessica Coen. “I know we were all really rooting for her,” said one staffer. Instead, Nick Denton opted to bring in Carmichael, and the rumblings began:

I wouldn’t say that we’re unhappy with Emma at all, but… we had like a really optimal choice that they passed over.

Translation: We’re unhappy they picked Emma.

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How Arianna Sparked Journalist to a ‘HuffPost for Surfers’

If you’re a surfer, you’re most likely already familiar with The Inertia, a super-slick website covering all things big-wave. What you may not know is the critical role played in the genesis of the site by the long reach of NYC.

TheInertiaSlide

The site is the brainchild of Zach Weisberg who, back in 2010 as editor-at-large of Surfer magazine, wrote a controversial blog post about racism in the sport. After refusing internal pressure to take it down, the post was nonetheless taken down by his publisher, leading Weisberg to quit and paddle out in search of his next venture.

Per a great little article by Honolulu-based Huffington Post fellow James Cave, Weisberg’s process at that time included a “soul-searching” trip to New York:

Weisberg happened upon a seminar given by Arianna Huffington, and was so inspired by her presentation that he was able to apply her vision for new media into the world he inhabited. “I listened to her talk and her vision at the moment; I felt that it could work perfectly in the world of surf and action sports. I decided to give it a shot, to try and build that.”

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Boy Genius Report’s Jonathan Geller on the Benefits on Anonymity

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Jonathan Geller has already lived an incredibly full life, and he’s not yet 30 years old. The founder of Boy Genius Report (the uber-popular mobile tech site) dropped out of high school his sophomore year to pursue a career in the music industry, which eventually led him to write an anonymous column for Engadget. This, in turn, led to the creation of BGR.com.

In our latest So What Do You Do column, Geller talks about writing for Engadget at 17, almost being sued by Cingular and the benefits of anonymity:

I stayed anonymous because at the time I was doing both music and [writing], and I didn’t want to be known in both worlds. I also liked the hype and marketing opportunities and uniqueness of being anonymous. I was this 17-year-old kid running the site, and the head of AT&T thought there were 1,000 people behind it, and he’s trying to come after me. Everyone in the tech industry feared me. By the time BGR got acquired by PMC, I decided to finally out myself. It just seemed like the right thing to do. I wanted to be a visible figure and the public face of my brand.

For more from Geller, including his advice for people starting a career covering tech, read: So What Do You Do, Jonathan Geller, President and Editor-in-Chief of Boy Genius Report?

NY Times Shutters Another Blog

The Great New York Times Blog Shutdown of 2014 continues. The Times has announced that it’s shuttering India Ink, its first country-specific blog. On the blog’s homepage, a message informed readers that the end had arrived.

“We will continue to produce web-only India Ink sketches, analyses, narratives and news stories, but they will appear on the World page, along with the rest of the newspaper’s coverage,” read the note. India Ink launched in 2011 and featured content produced by 21 Times staffers based in India.

Last week it was revealed that the Times planned to shutter many of its blogs. The first to go was The Lede.

Hyperlocal Network HamletHub Adds Another

In the shadow of the rise and fall of Patch, another hyperlocal network has been doing it in a manner that the AOL venture likely wishes – in retrospect – that it had too. Namely, growing via baby steps rather than busting out quickly across the country to satisfy a parent-company spreadsheet.

HamletHubsMap

HamletHub, launched in 2010, is now approaching two dozen sites. The latest, serving Croton-on-Hudson in New York, looks great and counts as its editor longtime resident Ken Sargeant:

Ken has lived in Croton with his family since 1991. He has played an active role in local environmental and cultural organizations throughout that time. A visual arts professional with a background in commercial photography, as well as documentary film, Ken is the proprietor of RiverLiver Productions, and co-Founder of the Harlem Cultural Archives, a New York State chartered historical society.

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Rob Lowe Vacation Disaster Engenders Comical ‘Related’ Article Tag

It’s something every media watcher has noticed at one point or another, on their own site and-or elsewhere on the Web: an incongruous “Related Article” suggestion.

Here’s today’s headline for a Bustle post by Alanna Bennett:

BustleHeadline

And here’s the suggestion, at the bottom of the article, for logical further reading:

BustleRelated

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Gawker Spreads Gawker Rumor

gawkerlogoSay what you want about Gawker — if nothing else, the site’s writers love themselves and love the fact that they work at Gawker. In a particularly nonsensical post, Gawker decided to spread a rumor that News Corp. was buying the collection of sites.

Weird, right? The post about the sale is even weirder:

Yesterday, at least two media reporters approached at least two Gawker Media employees about a potential sale to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp—or, more likely, 21st Century Fox. Apparently the rumor was first posted to Secret, the anonymous messaging smartphone app, though we couldn’t find a copy of the actual post. Efforts to determine the rumor’s origin came up empty.

To recap: Two media reporters (at the very least!) asked two Gawker staffers (at the very least!) about the site being sold to News Corp. Or maybe it was 21st Century Fox. Either way, the rumor was started via an anonymous messaging app for teens. Though no one is even sure if that’s where the rumor started because there’s no proof.

If you suddenly have a headache, trust us, you’re not alone.

Time Inc.’s Digital Sports Network Faces Challenges

120 Sports, the digital video network from Time Inc. and several pro sports leagues, is officially live. Now the hard part begins. As fairly hardcore sports fans ourselves, your FishbowlNY editors took a stroll through 120 Sports’ offerings this morning to see if it was something we’d actually enjoy. The answer? Probably not.

This isn’t neccessarily a knock on 120 Sports. The site is fast and intuitive, and the videos — highlights from games, breaking news and more — are presented nicely. As far as watching sports clips (each is 120 seconds), you really can’t beat it. There’s even original, live programming available.

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