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Vanessa Friedman Discusses NY Times Fashion Coverage

Vanessa Friedman GAt The New York Times, Vanessa Friedman has unenviable job of filling the void left by Cathy Horyn, the paper’s veteran fashion critic. Horyn left in January of last year, and Friedman was hired away from the Financial Times in early March.

In an interview with Adweek, Friedman discusses her plans for the Times. Below are some highlights.

On expanding the Times’ fashion coverage:

One exciting thing that we’ll be doing is moving the fashion page of the INYT from Tuesday to Thursday [to coincide with the Times’ Thursday Styles page] so that news stories can run globally at the same time.

On the difference between the FT and the Times:

The FT had a very specific slant on the world, and that was financial and European and very luxury, whereas the Times has a broader remit as a newspaper.

On readers being interested in the business of fashion:

If you look at what’s happened within the fashion industry over the last five to 10 years, what’s been really notable is that the corporate and the creative sides of the business have become ever closer together.

Ezra Klein Talks Shop

New York’s Daily Intel has a great, wide-ranging interview with Ezra Klein that will no doubt be picked apart as the day goes on. So why not start now?

You should, of course, read the whole piece, but below are some highlights.

On those Vox Cards, which are getting plenty of good (and bad) attention:

If media professionals look at this and think, That’s ridiculous, I already know all of this, that’s wonderful for us. It’s great on two levels. One is that if we are not aiming beneath our colleagues’ knowledge level, we’re making a huge mistake. We’re leaving tons of readers behind. Two: The more folks in the media feel like it’s beneath them to answers questions like, “What is marijuana?” or “What is Ukraine?” the more we don’t have to compete with them.

Hilariously calling a Card that answered questions about Gwyneth Paltrow “culture:”

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Michael Wolff Hates Everything, Volume 7,459

As anyone who follows the media beat knows, Michael Wolff pretty much hates everything, and that’s what makes him sort of fun. He’ll pan anyone and everything having to do with media, no matter who they are or how successful a company has been in the past. Nothing matters, because everything is terrible. Wolff is so grumpy that if given the chance, he’d pen a 2,500 word column on the downfall of ice cream. “The cone strategy is flawed! Sprinkles don’t resonate with today’s youth!”

The latest display of Wolff’s all world hate happened during a talk with Hearst Magazines’ president, David Carey. Here are just some of the people and companies that Wolff blasted, via Digiday:

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Breaking News: Rich Man Will Not Get Richer

ShutterstockAndersonCooperWe wish we could take credit for the headline above. But it comes in fact from Daily Mail user MoeMintz, who thinks it would be a better title for Meghan Keneally‘s article about a certain high-salaried CNN host rather than “Anderson Cooper Will NOT Inherit Any of His Mother’s Vanderbilt Millions When She Dies“.”

From the Daily Mail write-up:

“My mom’s made clear to me that there’s no trust fund. There’s none of that,” the CNN anchor told Howard Stern on his radio show.

“I don’t believe in inheriting money… I think it’s an initiative sucker. I think it’s a curse. Who’s inherited a lot of money that has gone on to do things in their own life?”

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Sports Journalists Discuss Role of Race in Sports Media

Richard Deitsch of Sports Illustrated has put together one hell of a column regarding the role of race in sports media. It’s an email roundtable discussion, featuring the following journalists: Cari Champion, host of ESPN2′s First Take; Jemele Hill, co-host of ESPN2′s Numbers Never Lie; Gregory Lee Jr., executive sports editor, Florida Sun-Sentinel; Tim Kawakami, sports columnist for the San Jose Mercury News; Angel Rodriguez, the Cincinnati Enquirer’s sports editor; and Darren Sands, sports business reporter and multimedia journalist for BlackEnterprise.com.

Below are some highlights from the piece. You can (and should) read the entire piece here.

On the “n word” and its use in the sports and non-sports worlds:

Hill: The n-word has been around for a long time and many of the conversations being had about it now have been had for years. But we’re having the conversation in sports now because of two white guys, Riley Cooper and Richie Incognito. I’m not saying it’s a bad thing, but it illustrates how when an issue moves into a certain space, it becomes something bigger. Anyway, I don’t think it should ever be used in professional settings, but how people use the word with their friends, in their home and in their personal lives is not for me to determine. I think it’s culturally arrogant for anyone to tell groups of people how they should relate to one another.

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Toby Young Ponders Tina Brown’s ‘Galactic Chutzpah’

TheSpectatorLogoSome of the contextualizing is questionable. But overall, Toby Young‘s The Spectator essay about the money-losing media trail trodden by Tina Brown and his companion commentary for The Daily Telegraph are thrillingly thought-provoking.

From The Spectator piece:

Take the case of Tina Brown, a New Yorker whose business ventures have lost far more than L’Wren Scott’s ever did, but who is completely inured to these setbacks because of her posh English upbringing… You won’t find Tina retiring to a darkened room with a bottle of whiskey and a revolver. On the contrary, she’s just signed a contract with Doubleday to write her memoirs — the appropriately titled Media Beast. Failure is just another career opportunity for her, which has always been the British way. As Winston Churchill said, ‘Success is going from one failure to the next with no loss of enthusiasm.’

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Nate Silver and Paul Krugman are Bickering Like Children

Nate Silver and Paul Krugman don’t seem to like each other, and so they’ve taken to sniping back and forth. The net result is — as with any media feud — a total loss.

It all started when Silver took a shot at op-ed columnists, explaining that “They don’t have any discipline in how they look at the world, and so it leads to a lot of bullshit, basically.” Shortly after that, Krugman fired back in a column saying that Silver’s new FiveThirtyEight.com was long on numbers, short on analyzing them. Krugman has since written a few more columns piling on FiveThirtyEight, culminating with “So far [FiveThirtyEight] looks like something between a disappointment and a disaster.”

Silver, of course, decided to swing back. He wrote that when FiveThirtyEight was under The New York Times umbrella, Krugman enjoyed the site. But now things have suddenly changed:

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Business Insider Hires Anthony Weiner

AnthonyWeiner-1Anthony Weiner — everyone’s favorite shirtless, pompous jerk — is now a columnist for Business Insider.

In a (perhaps satirical?) announcement, BI proclaimed that it was “very pleased” that Weiner would be penning a monthly column titled “Weiner!” Yes, the exclamation point is real.

Why, you ask? Why would BI want Weiner writing for them? Well, aside from being what seems to be an awful person, Weiner is famous. Oh, and some other bullshit:

We believe the unique combination of brashness and wonkiness that made Weiner one of last year’s most memorable candidates and one of the most high-profile advocates for health care reform during his time in Congress will make him a perfect fit for Business Insider.

Weiner’s Weiner! column debuts March 28.

Let’s Make Fun of Media Elite’s First Tweets

Twitter has launched a great site — first-tweet.com — that will embarrass any user. Naturally we thought this would be a great opportunity to make fun of some media elite.

First-tweet is self-explanatory — it allows you to see any public users’ first tweet. Most of them are boring, but some — like the ones below — are worth pointing out. Oh, and in case you’re wondering — your FishbowlNY editors’ first tweets were fantastic.

First Tweets from Media Mavens

Rupert Murdoch was still grappling with basic English when he sent his first tweet.

Screen Shot 2014-03-20 at 5.53.56 PM

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Starbucks to Give Oprah Her Own Tea Blend

oprah-ownStarting April 29, Oprah fans can get a little closer to the media maven by drinking tea bearing her name. Starbucks has announced that Teavana Oprah Chai Tea will be sold in Starbucks and Teavana locations across the country at the end of next month.

Oprah worked with a teaologist (kids, don’t tell your parents this is what you’re studying at college) to create the blend, which is described as “a bold infusion of cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves, blended with loose-leaf black tea and rooibos.” Who doesn’t love rooibos?

A portion of the sales of Teavana Oprah Chai will go to Oprah’s Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy Foundation.

If each bag of the tea doesn’t feature Oprah’s face, Starbucks made a big mistake.

[h/t: GrubStreet]

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