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Tablets

The Huffington Post AOL Media Group Launches First E-Book

To us, e-books are an odd thing. They’re somewhere between a book and an article. They exist in this odd middle area that almost provokes enough interest to make you want to check them out, but in the end you never do. Kind of like movies starring Jim Carrey. But that hasn’t stopped publishers from giving them a try. The latest comes from The Huffington Post AOL Media Group, which has launched its first e-book, titled A People’s History of the Great Recession.

The e-book is written by Arthur Delaney and covers what happened to the unemployed, the middle class and “the every man,” when the economic crisis began a few years ago. “Nearly every book about the economic crisis of the late 2000s focuses on the institutions that caused the recession and the brilliant geniuses who were at the top when it all went down,” said Delaney of his work. “This book is about the people on the bottom who got flattened — through no fault of their own.”

Arianna Huffington is excited about Delaney’s project. She stated in a blog post, “Arthur embraced his mission with a powerful combination of passion, empathy, and a healthy dose of anger.”

Here is an excerpt if you’re interested. The e-book is available for download on the Kindle, Nook, Apple iBook or Kobo.

Meredith Expands Nook Color Lineup

We’d love to keep talking to our dog about the earthquake that just hit New York, but alas, it’s back to work. First up: Meredith has added special editions of Parents and Fitness to the Nook Color, the e-reader from Barnes & Noble. The Nook versions will feature new video and audio, along with workout tips and other items.

Meredith is also planning to release Nook Color versions for Ladies’ Home Journal, Eating Well, Midwest Living, Siempre Mujer and Traditional Home.

Liz Schimel, Meredith’s Chief Digital Officer, said of the news, “We are excited to be adding key brands from our best in class portfolio to Barnes & Noble’s digital platform. We know from our research that our readers thoroughly enjoy Nook Color, and are thrilled to be expanding our offerings with such a great partner as Barnes & Noble.”

The Five Most Popular Condé Nast Magazines Apps

Yesterday FishbowlNY told you that Condé Nast - and The New Yorker specifically – is enjoying quite a bit of success in digital form. Today WWD has collected some rough reports from other Condé titles, because nothing is more fun than a little competition, right?

The figures are only estimates, so don’t go bragging to your friends about your favorite magazine being the most popular. Hopefully you wouldn’t do that anyway, but we just thought we’d warn you.

Below are the five most popular Condé magazine apps from June, taking into account “a lump sum of single-copy buyers, readers who have purchased bundled digital and print subscriptions and print subscribers who have raised their hand for digital access, free of charge:”

  1. The New Yorker: 89,684
  2. Wired: 45,867
  3. GQ: 35,862
  4. Vanity Fair: 27,138
  5. Glamour: 15,291

Condé Nast Nets 242,000 Digital Subscribers Since Introducing Apple’s System

Maybe Apple’s subscription system is a good thing after all. It has been for Condé Nast, at least. The company has drawn 242,000 digital customers in the six week period since introducing Apple’s subscription method. A big part of that appears to be The New Yorker’s iPad edition, which has garnered praise for its simplistic approach.

Monica Ray, Executive Vice President of Consumer Marketing for Condé Nast, says that the numbers provide a reason to feel optimistic:

We were at the forefront of introducing digital subscriptions, and the results have been encouraging―better than we could have imagined in many cases. The digital counts are increasing every day, and while this represents a small portion of our subscription circulation, we find it incredibly promising, especially given the short time we have been marketing subscriptions.

Once again, it sounds as if Steve Jobs knows best. Now, who wants to convince him to lend the government some money?

Hearst Opens App Lab

Hearst has opened a lab dedicated to developing apps on the 41st floor of Hearst Tower. The “Hearst App Lab” (let’s hope the developers are more creative than the name) area comes equipped with several high-tech features. There’s a wall of video screens that can be written on and used to display apps, a high definition camera that broadcasts video onto the wall, and furniture that can be altered easily, depending on how big the crowd is.

Adweek reports that Hearst App Lab is expected to draw plenty of people through its doors:

David Carey, president of Hearst Magazines, said the idea was to have a place where employees can learn about the tablet market, develop apps, and brainstorm ideas with advertisers and ad buyers. Hearst will also use it to test its apps with focus.

Sounds like a smart idea. As apps become more valuable to publishers, we can expect these type of areas to increase.

Fox News Launches its iPad App

If 24 hours a day of Fox News coverage of the world isn’t enough for you, Mashable reports that conservatives’ favorite news network is now launching its very own iPad app, promised to be as fair and balanced as the rest of Roger Ailes‘ empire.

According to Jeremy Steinberg, Fox News VP of digital media ad sales and business development, Fox News waited until now to release its app because it was looking for “the critical mass that would support the app financially.”

What you can expect: the app is divided into two key sections: a “Happening Now” section and a story timeline. Also, lots of ExxonMobil advertising, as Exxon is the exclusive launch partner for Fox News’s iPad app. But no live video so far. So don’t give up the cable channel just yet.

New York Magazine Now Available on the Nook

New York magazine is now available on the Barnes & Noble Nook e-reader. As part of the Nook Newsstand, the magazine is available by single issue (at the print newsstand price of $4.99) or monthly subscription ($2.99/month, in line with the print subscription rate). The Nook version provides the full content of the print magazine.

“We’re excited to be on the Nook and expect to find a growing audience on the device,” said New York magazine’s Ken Sheldon in a press release. And you know who that growing audience is? Apparently it’s women — as FishbowlNY wrote yesterday, “sales of women’s magazines on the Nook are strong, and at times have even outsold their counterparts on the iPad.” Women love New York magazine, and women love the Nook. Seems like a good decision all around.

Women Like The Nook, Men, The iPad

Magazine publishers are finding out that when it comes to tablets, women flock to the Nook Color. According to The New York Times, sales of women’s magazines on the Nook are strong, and at times have even outsold their counterparts on the iPad. This is impressive because the Nook has only been around since last November, as Liz Schimel, Executive Vice President for Digital Media for Meredith, points out:

We regarded it as sort of a test. Would the Nook magazine experience resonate with consumers? We were extremely pleasantly surprised. I think Barnes & Noble has been very smart about creating a whole brand and a campaign that’s really targeted at their core mass audience which overlaps nicely with our audience.

So why do women prefer the Nook? It appears that women don’t want all the bells and whistles that come with the iPad. As usual, women are smart enough to realize that they don’t need extras, while men insist on having a device that can perform 748 functions, even though they only ever use 17 of them.

But there’s something more to women preferring the Nook Color.

Read more

Next Issue Media Releases Magazines on Android Platform

Ad Age is reporting that Next Issue Media (NIM) has finally launched magazine apps on tablets that aren’t called iPad. NIM was hopeful back in January that when it launched it would feature two magazines from each of the publishing houses that own a stake in it (Hearst, Meredith, Conde Nast, Time), but it looks to have fallen short of that goal.

As of now, there are seven magazines available through the Verizon V Cast Store: Time, Fortune, The New Yorker, Esquire, Fitness and Parents. Just like the Apple subscriptions, consumers can purchase a single issue or subscribe for a year.

It’s a good start for NIM, because even though the iPad is the most popular tablet, there are always going to be consumers who want to use something else. Now those people have a way to read some of their favorite magazines on tablets.

NIM is taking a small step here, but that’s better than nothing at all.

Tablet Owners Spending More Time on TV and Phones, But Less Time on PCs

Some new numbers from Nielsen show that owning a tablet is reducing the amount of time that people spend on their PCs, Ina Fried reports for All Things Digital.

According to the study, roughly a third of laptop and desktop users report using their PC less or even not at all since getting a tablet. Also, 77 percent of tablet owners say they are using their slates for things that they used to do on a PC

Conversely, according to the same study, a significant number of users say they are spending more time on their Internet-connected TVs and smartphones. So the tablet isn’t making all other technology obsolete, it’s just that PCs are the big losers so far. We’ll see how long it takes before tablets start swallowing up everything else around them.

And what kind of tablets are they using? The iPad still dominates, with about 82 percent of tablet owners using iPads. The Samsung Galaxy Tab comes in a distant second at 4 percent. Apple owns us all, pretty much.

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