TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

The State of Journalism

Henry Blodget Defends Slideshows

PandoMonthlyLogoPandoDaily has some fun coverage of the moderated conversation the site hosted last night in New York with Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget.

There’s Adam Penenberg‘s item, most notable for the way it recalls a 2005 New York Times op-ed written by Blodget. And there’s this separate bit of coverage from Hamish McKenzie, about portions of the conversation:

Business Insider has copped a lot of flak over its four-year existence for milking slideshows for page views. One example of such criticism: a piece I published that made fun of Nicholas Carlson’s 50-page slideshow about his first Airbnb experience.

Read more

Soledad O’Brien On Pursuing Stories She Believes In

SoledadOBrien

Soledad O’Brien has embarked on a new journey, and she couldn’t be happier about it. The former CNN morning anchor recently launched Starfish Media Group, a multiplatform company dedicated to uncovering empowering stories from around the world.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, O’Brien discusses the challenges of starting her own company, her thoughts of the current state of cable news and the importance of pursuing stories that remain uncovered by the mainstream media:

You’ve said that Starfish Media Group allows you to explore topics that you care deeply about. How would a broader adoption of that model affect journalism as a whole?
In a way, I think what you’re seeing already among viewers is that exact model. People are interested in things not necessarily covered by the mainstream media, so they download things online. The categories are growing because people find out that they’re not able to get information about stories that are of interest to them on the evening news. So I think that’s already in place and it’s only going to become more so….I think that there’s a sense of “I have a story to tell” or “I would like to see my story reflected” somewhere, especially in a nation that’s more and more demographically diverse.

To get career tips from O’Brien and more info on her company, read: So What Do You Do, Soledad O’Brien, CEO of Starfish Media Group?

– Aneya Fernando

News Reporter Argues Stories About Rape Don’t Need Adjective ‘Brutal’

CBSNewYorkLogoIf the first post by 1010 WINS news reporter John Montone is any indication, this is going to be a fun weekly audio blog to keep checking back on.

You read that right. You can either read or listen to Radio Free Montone. To kick things off, he tees off on the click-bait and in other cases simply careless use of superfluous or inaccurate adjectives. Stuff like this week’s “startling” Tom Hanks health news and many outlets’ de facto description of a rape:

How about the word “brutal” used to describe a rape. Is that word really necessary? Can a woman be tenderly raped?

Read more

Medill Journalism Student: ‘Clearly I Did Not Know the Proper Way to Aggregate’

DeseretNewsLogoIt’s been a rough week for the Deseret News, a well-trafficked Utah newspaper owned by the Church of Latter-day Saints, and their recent summer intern Michael Smith. All thanks to the intrepid efforts of iMediaEthics managing editor Sydney Smith.

On Monday-Tuesday, Smith gradually got to the bottom of dozens of improperly attributed online items, all with Smith’s byline. Today, the former intern, a graduate student at Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism, explains and takes full responsibility for his sloppy actions involving sources such as the Washington Examiner and cbc.ca:

“Clearly I did not know the proper way to aggregate, which was my intention,” he told iMediaEthics via email. “I now know that I should have used quotation marks even after I wrote ‘According to…’ or ‘X reports that…’ I thought that explicitly stating whoever reported made it clear that it was from them, and not me, but I was obviously wrong.”

Read more

Americans Hate Media a Little Less Than Last Year

Good news, journalists! Americans no longer have an all-time low opinion of your work. Instead, according to a new Gallup poll, 44 percent say that they have “a great deal” or “fair amount” of trust and confidence in mass media. That’s up from last year’s 40 percent, the lowest it had ever been since Gallup began tracking media confidence in 1997. So pat yourself on the back! You are officially slightly less terrible.

While you’re having your congratulatory beer, enjoy these other highlights from the report:

    • As for political leanings, Democrats trust the media the most, at 60 percent. Only 33 percent of Republicans said they had a great deal or fair amount of trust in the media.
    • Speaking of politics, more Americans say that the media is too liberal (46 percent) than too conservative (13 percent).
    • Despite this year’s uptick, overall, Americans’ trust in the media has been on a steady decline since 2007.

ProPublica Founder Surveys the Changed Landscape of Investigative Journalism

From South Africa’s The Media Online comes an interesting overview of non-profit investigative news outfit ProPublica.

Reporter Peta Krost Mauder spoke with founder and executive chairperson Paul Steiger, previously a managing editor at the Wall Street Journal. He acknowledged that the Internet has destroyed the business model of high-quality print journalism and that non-profit is just one of several new ways to go:

Steiger has approached numerous philanthropists and convinced them that a portion of their money would be well spent on investigative journalism. “It is a fine way to spend their money because investigative journalism allows [the] public to fix problems of which they would otherwise be unaware,” says Steiger. “Investigative stories are always in the public good…”

Read more

Horizon Media Jumps Aboard BuzzFeed Social Storytelling Progam

For the time being, this BuzzFeed list is very short.

But there’s little doubt it will quickly grow beyond the single media agency announced this week as having joined the website’s Social Storytelling Program:

Horizon Media and its clients will collaborate with BuzzFeed’s creative team on best practices for content creation and social advertising. The new partnership will allow the agency to use and respond in real time to the performance of branded content using BuzzFeed’s Social Dashboard and Social Brand Lift research methodology.

Read more

Temple Grad Students Feel Broadcast Journalism is ‘Safer’

Author-journalist Thom Nickels has an interesting recap on the Huffington Post of a recent event at Temple University. He was part of a panel that also included Philadelphia Daily News columnist Elmer Smith and says one of the first things he learned is that most graduate students in the audience had already bailed on print:

I was surprised to discover that the vast majority of students were broadcast journalism majors.

With the closing and bankruptcy of so many newspapers across the country, there seemed to be a consensus among the students that a career in print journalism was suspect, whereas a career in broadcast journalism – where there have been no reported of closings of television news departments – was “safer.”

Read more

Journalism Major Blogs About His Decision to Stick with It

Our new favorite person is Brian Weidy. This aspiring writer from New York City and regular PolicyMic contributor is heading into his sophomore year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Yesterday, for his 200th PolicyMic piece, he penned an essay titled “Why I Am Majoring in Journalism Despite Everyone Telling Me Not to.” There’s no doubt a Master’s from Columbia remains the gold standard for conversion to choice employment. But on the undergrad side, people like Weidy have to deal with a lot of ongoing skepticism. As he writes:

Despite these guys [The Daily Beast], them [The Daily Beast], them again [The Daily Beast] and even these other guys [Gawker] telling me that this is the worst major to pursue, as a naïve 19-year-old, I feel some sort of collegiate-aged burden to pursue what I really love. And if three more years pass and the real-world comes knocking, I could find myself working in PR or advertising. But until then, my dreams of having a column in the Times or in The New Yorker are still firmly intact.

Read more

Poll: Majority of Americans Get News From TV

According to a new Gallup poll, most of us turn to the tube for news, and it’s not even close. The survey, which asked a little over 2,000 adults what medium they view as their primary source of news, found that 55 percent said TV. The Internet was second, but was cited by only 21 percent of respondents.

As for print? A paltry nine percent of Americans turn to newspapers for news. The most often cited paper was the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, tied with one percent of the vote.

When respondents gave a specific TV outlet as their answer, Fox was named the most often at eight percent, followed by CNN at seven.

Does living in a nation where most people turn to Fox and CNN for news make you feel terrible or terrible? Please answer in the comments.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>