TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘BBC’

Morning Media Newsfeed: FiveThirtyEight Is Live | Sony Layoffs Begin | Carney to Resign?

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

natesilver_NYTsports

Statistician Nate Silver’s ESPN Site Kicks Off Amid Blog Frenzy (Bloomberg Businessweek)
Nate Silver, the New York Times blogger who jumped to ESPN last year, introduced his revamped FiveThirtyEight.com website Monday as more traditional media companies seek investments in online journalism. Poynter / MediaWire In an article welcoming readers, editor-in-chief Silver says the fact that he called the 2012 presidential election “was and remains a tremendously overrated accomplishment.” It only stood out “in comparison to others in the mainstream media,” Silver writes. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The new site already features a number of articles and visualizations on topics ranging from the Crimean independence vote to the efficacy of toilet seat covers to Silver’s highly anticipated March Madness predictions. FiveThirtyEight will also produce podcasts and documentaries. GigaOM Silver said that he doesn’t want his site to replace or supersede traditional journalism, but to fill what he sees as a “need in the marketplace” for rigorous data-oriented journalism. The site’s logo, a stylized fox head, comes from what Silver says is an ancient Greek aphorism about how the hedgehog knows one large thing, while the fox “knows many small things.” Capital New York Remnants of Silver’s time as a data wonk at the Times remain. The site includes an archive of many, but not all, of the FiveThirtyEight articles published when it was a Times brand, dating back to 2009. Several are even bylined by the current head of the Times‘ impending data venture The Upshot: David Leonhardt. Times graphics editor Kevin Quealy also makes appearances in the archives, as well as Thomas Schaller, a professor of political science at the University of Maryland who contributed to the site when it was part of the Times, and Andrew Gelman, professor of statistics and political science at Columbia University. FishbowlDC FiveThirtyEight is back, baby. And for all of you in D.C. journo-land, this likely means you will have no jobs. The overwhelming and undeniable power of Nate Silver‘s math will render your quaint approaches to “newsgathering” as irrelevant as they are devoid of insight. Sorry.

Read more

Sponsored Post

Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Flipboard Buys Zite | BBC3 to Go Online-Only | Egypt Tries AJ Staff

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

CNN Sells Zite to Flipboard (CNNMoney)
CNN has sold its news reader app, Zite, to Flipboard, a social magazine application. As part of the deal, Flipboard has also teamed up with CNN to launch custom magazines for CNN shows anchored by Fareed Zakaria, Jake Tapper and John King. The deal could be valued as high as $60 million over time, taking into account future advertising revenue, said a source familiar with the deal. TVNewser The sale occurred less than three years after CNN acquired Zite for $20 million. CNN and Flipboard’s partnership will allow CNN to expand its mobile reach and take advantage of Flipboard’s technology and mobile sales strategy. Re/code Zite itself will shut down, but CNN says most of its 20 employees will go to work for Flipboard. Zite CEO Mark Johnson will not be joining them. Forbes / Jeff Bercovici The deal merges two apps that let users aggregate news stories from all over into a single magazine-like experience. Of the two, Flipboard has been considerably more successful: It’s currently ranked No. 5 among free iPad news apps in Apple’s App Store, while Zite is No. 39. Flipboard will absorb the machine-learning technology that Zite uses to personalize news feeds for its users. Mashable The move also divests CNN of one of its most high-profile acquisitions while putting it in front of Flipboard’s users, which according to Johnson number more than 100 million.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Oscar Ratings Soar | Gould Leaves NBC News | WaPo Branches to NYC

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

ellen-oscars

Oscars Rise to 43 Million Viewers, Most-Watched in 10 Years (THR / The Live Feed)
ABC’s annual airing of the Oscar telecast dominated Sunday night. Final ratings for the Ellen DeGeneres-hosted show have the Academy Awards more than 2.5 million viewers ahead of last year, even in the key demographic. All told, ABC’s coverage of the Academy Awards averaged 43 million viewers and a 12.9 rating among adults 18-49. That’s a 6 percent boost in viewers and a virtual tie with last year’s adults-under-50 score. DeGeneres brought lifts among younger viewers and men — with ratings among adults 18-34 and men both at their highest since 2007. Variety DeGeneres also helped pushed the Oscars to new heights on Twitter on Sunday night: The total U.S. audience on the social platform was nearly one-third the TV draw, with a 75 percent jump in tweets related to the show over last year. About 13.9 million people saw a total of 1.04 billion tweets about the Oscars, according to Nielsen’s SocialGuide. LostRemote The ceremony also led to more than 25.4 million interactions (status updates, comments and likes) by some 11.1 million Facebook users, and the top social moment was the crowning of 12 Years A Slave as best picture. TVNewser ABC’s related programming also received a boost. Oscars Red Carpet Live, hosted by Good Morning America anchors Robin Roberts and Lara Spencer, was up compared to last year for all three half-hour segments of the show. The final half-hour pulled in 27.6 million viewers. Deadline Hollywood Coming on right after the big show for a ninth year in a row, Jimmy Kimmel Live: After The Oscars was up 22 percent in total viewers and 20 percent in the key demo over last year, good for its best ever post-Oscars performance. With past Oscar winner Kevin Spacey among his guests, Kimmel was watched by 6.993 million viewers overall, with 2.423 million in the demo.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: Grantland Under Fire | BBC Host Dead | Roker Feeling The Heat?

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

ESPN Responds to Criticism of Grantland’s ‘Dr. V’ Story (BuzzFeed)
ESPN issued a statement Sunday in response to continued controversy and criticism over a Jan. 15 Grantland article about a transgender physicist and golf club inventor. The story in question, “Dr. V’s Magical Putter,” profiled Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt, the inventor of the Oracle GXI smart putter club — and ultimately outed Vanderbilt as a transgender woman, against her wishes. At the end of the piece, author Caleb Hannan wrote that Vanderbilt killed herself. Slate / CultureBox Over the last few days, Twitter has bubbled over with arguments about what Hannan did and didn’t do. At one extreme are the people calling Hannan a murderer, alleging that a trans woman killed herself because she believed a reporter was about to out her. At the opposite pole are those who say Hannan did what journalists are trained to do: report out a story until he unearths the truth. Glittering Scrivener It is not the mandate of a writer to keep pursuing a private citizen’s secrets (secrets which have exactly no impact on the product you are writing about) until they kill themselves. This is not an honorable act. Jezebel It appears from the story’s tone that there was zero ethical concern whatsoever concerning the trans status. This is the sort of stuff that comes up, by the way, in 101 ethics classes: Say you’re called to cover the story of a hero who saved a drowning man from an icy river, and in the course of reporting you determine the hero is also gay, and would prefer to remain anonymous for privacy reasons. Do you report on it? The answer, of course, is no, you don’t report that detail, because the hero being gay is irrelevant to the story. But real-life scenarios are not so simple. Shakesville This is one of the most cavalier, irresponsible pieces of journalism I have read in a very long time. New Republic An inquiry to Grantland’s editors was redirected to an ESPN spokesperson. He said that Bill Simmons, who runs Grantland, will respond via Grantland soon, and wrote: “We understand and appreciate the wide range of thoughtful reaction this story has generated and to the family and friends of Essay Anne Vanderbilt, we express our deepest condolences.” Hannan did not reply to a request for comment. Nieman Storyboard I spoke to Hannan Sunday afternoon. He told me he has been following the reaction to the story, and that he is working with his editors to prepare a statement. He said he will discuss the story when he and his editors feel the time is right.

Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: D, Dow Jones to Split | Inside Reuters Next | BBC Cuts 75


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

AllThingsD Parting Ways With Dow Jones (Fortune)
The team behind influential tech site AllThingsD is severing ties with founding owner Dow Jones, a subsidiary of News Corp. Fortune reported last month that AllThingsD co-executive editors Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg had hired investment bank Code Advisors to find outside investors, as they continued to negotiate with Dow Jones about either ending or extending a partnership agreement that was set to expire on Dec. 31. In the end, however, they were not able to work out a deal. Not only does that mean the AllThingsD team will no longer share content and certain advertising functions with Dow Jones, but also that Mossberg will leave his Wall Street Journal column after 20 years (he has been with the paper for a total of four decades). Dow Jones also will retain the AllThingsD brand. All of this becomes effective at year-end. AllThingsD First things first: We’re keeping the Steelcase hot-seat red chairs. Forever. In fact, we own quite a few now. And we’ll still be scooping and reviewing all things digital right here, at this Web address, for a few more months. So, while we appreciate the teary farewells we’ve been receiving across the Web, they’re premature — not by just months, but by many, many years. GigaOM The decision leaves All Things Digital — which was wholly owned by Dow Jones — in limbo while it tries to find a new media partner or buyer. NYT Dow Jones confirmed on Thursday evening that the company would part ways with Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher at the end of the year when their contracts expire. Gerard Baker, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, said in a statement that the Journal was increasing its bet on technology coverage even without Swisher and Mossberg, its most prominent stars. FishbowlNY The separation of AllThingsD and Dow Jones also means the end of Mossberg’s tenure at The Wall Street Journal. He had been with the paper since 1970. TheWrap Swisher and Mossberg launched AllThingsD in 2003, and it quickly became a must-read tech site. Its annual “D” conference is a Who’s Who of Silicon Valley that makes millions of dollars annually for the journalists and Dow Jones. The conference brand had expanded into a media version and to Asia in recent years.

Read more

Letter Sparks Concern That Mark Thompson Misled About Sex Allegations

A new letter has fanned the flames already scorching new New York Times CEO Mark Thompson. The ex-BBC chief has claimed that he only learned of the sex allegations against British celebrity Jimmy Savile after he left his job, but the note might prove otherwise. Thompson is facing heat because people have claimed that he killed a news program that was investigating Savile, in the hopes that it would quell the scandal.

According to the Times (by the way, it must be brutal to be dragged over the coals by your own company), the letter was sent to The Sunday Times, by lawyers representing Thompson and another unnamed BBC executive. People who have seen the note told the Times that it contained “a summary of the alleged abuse, including the allegation that some abuse might have occurred at the BBC.” The letter was sent 10 days before Thompson left the BBC.

An aide to Thompson while he was at the BBC told the Times that he did “verbally authorize” his lawyers to send it. However, “It’s not clear if he was shown it, but he doesn’t remember reading it.”

It would be quite odd for someone of Thompson’s position — or anyone, really — to agree to a letter that threatened to sue another company without reading it, don’t you think? We have a feeling things are going to get a lot hotter for Thompson.

New York Times Staffers a Little Worried About Mark Thompson, Their New CEO

Today marks the beginning of the Mark Thompson era at The New York Times Company, and it could be a long time before he settles in comfortably. Thompson comes aboard as his past stint at BBC continues to haunt him.

Currently, British law enforcement agents are investigating the celebrity Jimmy Savile over allegations that he abused hundreds of underage girls. Thompson enters into that picture because people have claimed that under his watch, the BBC program Newsnight killed an investigative piece on Savile, in an effort to quiet the scandal. To make matters worse, Thompson’s successor and two other senior executives have abruptly resigned due to pressure from the alleged misconduct.

As you can imagine, Times staffers are a little worried about the whole thing.

Read more

BBC’s Katty Kay Weighs Writing, Blogging With Paying The Bills

eBookSummit100x100.gifIf you ever wonder how authors and bloggers do it — that relentless, 24-hour-a-day publicity driving social media quest — you’re not alone. Katty Kay, a BBC journalist and author, is right there with you.

During an interview at mediabistro.com’s eBook Summit, Kay wondered aloud how self-promoting authors, bloggers and other freelance writers survive. Do they write while also having a full-time job to pay the bills? We’ve often wondered the same ourselves, but there seems to be no right answer. Even Kay acknowledged that she was able to write her book, Womenomics, in part because of her full time gig at the BBC.

But beyond an awareness of the challenges of the publishing and journalism world today, Kay did have some good advice for journalists: focus on your own brand through blogs and social networking. Gone is the conventional wisdom that journalists have to write a book in order to extend their credibility and notoriety. Now, it’s all about the blog.

“Journalists with a high profile in Washington have a blog that’s a high profile,” Kay said, citing George Stephanopolous, Jake Tapper and John Dickerson as good examples of this. She also said journalists are now using their blogs as a homebase while working for many different organizations or platforms. “The more places I have to get income from and to have a platform on, the safer life feels.”

VIDEO: Sister blog TVNewser talks with Kay at the eBook Summit about being a foreigner working on a U.S. news broadcast.

Earlier: eBook Summit: Digital Lessons For Journalists, News Organizations

Twitter Calls Out CNN, But Kurtz Misses The Boat

kurtz.pngOver the weekend, tempers flared over CNN‘s coverage — or lack thereof — of the Iranian election and subsequent protests. Frustrated viewers took to Twitter to voice their concern over CNN’s oversight or lack of interest in the foreign controversy, creating the hashtag #cnnfail, which was a trending topic until yesterday. (It’s no longer trending this morning, although #IranElection, Tehran and Mousavi are.)

Yesterday, our colleagues at WebNewser caught up with #cnnfail, noting that NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen had asked Washington Post media columnist Howard Kurtz, who also hosts CNN show “Reliable Sources,” to include #cnnfail in his column today.

Although Kurtz discussed the legitimacy of Twitter and whether journalists are “going overboard” with it on his show yesterday and in his column today, he completely ignored the protests taking place on the social network against the news network where he works. On Kurtz’s show, CNN’s Rick Sanchez mentioned that Twitter had helped him to more effectively cover happenings in Iran — a perfect opening for them to discuss #cnnfail.

“Last night, when…I started Twittering about what was going on in Iran, I learned as much about the situation in Iran as I would have watching frankly my network, the BBC, the New York Times, the Washington Post combined,” Sanchez said.

Kurtz’s thoughts on the issue would have been much more timely if he had discussed #cnnfail and how Twitter had become a media watchdog in this instance. Instead, in his column he talked about celebrity Twitters, and quoted actress Mariel Hemingway. Did he write his column weeks ago and never look at it again? We think he missed the boat on this one.

What do you think? How do you feel about the coverage of Iran by the news networks? Do you think Kurtz should have discussed #cnnfail?

Watch the Twitter segment from “Reliable Sources” after the jump

Read more

Times Columnist Carr Talks About Future Of Newspapers

carr.pngAfter writing about future of his own paper in his column yesterday, New York Times media columnist David Carr appeared on “BBC World News America” on BBC America last night to talk about the fate of daily newspapers.

Carr told “BBC World News America” anchor Matt Frei, that he is more excited than ever to work at the Gray Lady since the current climate of shutting down newsrooms “has made the kind of information that we make and manufacture every single day, indeed by the hour, all the more important.”

In the interview, as in his column, Carr acknowledged that the Times has to come up with some new ways to generate revenue. Despite the fact that its Web site has 20 million readers and, according to Carr, “3 million people that stop by all the time throughout the day.”

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>