TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘JI HYUN PARK’

9 Interview Errors You Might Not Know You’re Committing

Let’s be honest: Getting the job is all about staying on the interviewer’s good side. But even the best of us can annoy the hiring manager without even realizing it. Example one? Talking way too much.

Sheryl Bender, senior HR representative with the Port of Long Beach, Calif., calls people who gab incessantly “the bane of an interviewer’s existence.”

“We understand that you want to answer the question fully, but being concise — as long as you’ve answered the question — is truly okay. The longer you talk, the higher your chances of turning the interviewer off to your answer,” she said. “Also, pay attention to social cues; if the interviewer frequently has to cut you off in order to move on, you’re probably talking too much.”

Learn how to fix eight more blunders in 9 Things You Should Never Do on a Job Interview.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

 

Think Hyperlocal When Pitching Afar

At Afar, editors are seeking stories of travelers who like to juice the place they’re visiting for all it’s worth — interacting with the locals, going off the touristy trail to shop in real marketplaces, and eating indigenous, authentically prepared meals.

Although their median income hovers just above the six-figure mark and they enjoy all of the earmarks of luxury, the mag’s readers like a real-life experience with their vacationing. With that in mind, aspiring Afar writers need to bring their A-game (think affluence and authenticity) to snag an assignment.

“There’s a real emphasis on giving readers a deeper dive, a sort of street-level view of a place,” editor-in-chief Julia Cosgrove explained.

Find out which sections are ripe for input in How To Pitch: Afar.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Globetrotting Foodies Can Find a Home at Afar

If you’re a foodie with a fully stamped passport, Afar editors want to hear your stories, but only if your far-reaching adventures break away from the tourist traps and allow you to enjoy indigenous, authentically prepared meals.

And it will take more than a simple recipe to cinch the deal. Editors want queries centered around a local authentic dish, putting it in a historical context and exploring how it connects to the people and community that birthed it.

“So it’s not food as food, but food as culture,” editor-in-chief Julia Cosgrove emphasized.

Get contact info for editors and more guidelines in How To Pitch: Afar.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Get $1 Per Word And Up At Food Network Magazine

Want to see your byline next to those of Food Network stars? It is difficult, but not impossible.

Right now, about 5 to 10 percent of Food Network Magazine‘s content is freelance-generated, at most. ”We’re a hard pitch. I can probably count on one or two hands how many pitches we’ve accepted since we launched,” said deputy editor Tracy Saelinger. “That said, we welcome ideas from writers, but they just have to be newsy, quirky and fun. We get pitched lots of tired trends that feel like old news.”

For details on three freelancer-friendly sections, read How To Pitch: Food Network Magazine.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Join the Brotherhood of Maxim Writers

Despite all the recent reshuffling in its staff,  Maxim remains tethered to its initial man-minded mission, featuring pieces with the brashly irreverent yet surprisingly instructive tone of an enlightened frat brother.

“I’d say the level of humor and discourse has gotten a little sharper and smarter,” said editor-in-chief Dan Bova, “but the goal is still to be that plain-spoken, witty best friend guiding you through the guy universe.”

But don’t think you’re going to break in with a pitch about yet another celebrity. ”Somebody proposing we should interview Chris Rock is not being particularly helpful. We do most of the star-wrangling ourselves,” Bova explained.

So, what type of pitches are editors looking for? Get the details in How To Pitch: Maxim

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

5 Ways To Make Networking Painless

If all the spring conferences and after work mixers typically leave you noshing on free appetizers rather than actually meeting people, there’s a cure. In mediabistro.com’s latest AvantGuild feature, career coaches outline five steps to help even the most socially averse conquer their new-people phobia.

No. 2: Listen first.

The one hard and fast rule to remember is to listen more than you talk, says Juli Monroe, a coach at 1 to 1 Discovery, a Washington, D.C.-based networking and social media agency. “If you listen first, then you know how to talk about yourself,” she explained. “If you can address their needs, then you can pitch your services, but in a targeted and strategic way.”

Read more in How To Network in Any Situation.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Before You Sign That Book Contract

It’s finally happened: Your awesome magazine or newspaper article has led to a book deal. But before you jump to sign that contract, take a moment to read it thoroughly. Bets are, it won’t have your best interest at heart; there will be clauses hidden in the fine print that might kill your future prospects. For example:

The non-compete clause. This can prohibit writers from working on books that would compete with the existing title they are publishing. The problem is that it’s often so broadly written that it could stop you from writing magazine articles or blog posts, all of which can help to market the book.

“Any such clause should be limited to book-length work and should give the publisher a deadline for refusing a new book proposal on a related topic, which then frees the writer to pursue publication elsewhere,” advised Meg Schnieder, an Iowa-based author of 12 books, including The Everything Guide to Writing a Book Proposal.

For more information on other potential deal breakers and steps to renegotiation, read The 7 Biggest Red Flags in Book Contracts.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Land Lifestyle Bylines At Sister 2 Sister

Initially launched as a newsletter for women in entertainment by industry veteran Jamie Foster BrownSister 2 Sister has been breaking stories in black Hollywood since 1988. But it’s the lifestyle half of S2S where freelancers can break in with pitches on tips and trends on food, fitness, style and more.

In fact, the magazine prides itself on educating African-American women 18-49 in all aspects of their lives. And writing for an independent title means you can relax your language a little. “We don’t do stuffy,” said senior editor Ericka Boston. “Our pieces have a conversational tone.” But, just like anywhere else, your grammar and AP Style mastery does matter.

Get details on specific sections to pitch and word counts in How To Pitch: Sister 2 Sister.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

Tap Into Black Hollywood for Sister 2 Sister

Unlike the gossip and innuendo rampant in the blogosphere, Sister 2 Sister routinely gets its information from the stars themselves. Whether Halle Berry‘s ex-husband Eric Benet was denying a reported sex addiction or Tamar Braxton and hubby Vince Herbert were dishing about their upcoming reality show, it was S2S that often got stars to open up when other publications couldn’t.

“Our mission is to try to teach,” explained senior editor Ericka Boston. “So, we’ll talk to the entertainers about the lessons that they’ve learned from whatever experiences they’ve gone through, and it’s more so about achieving an understanding, as opposed to just fishing for a headline.”

Although there’s little room in the print magazine for outside Q&As with celebs, freelancers can still pitch their entertainment stories to S2SMagazine.com. But, “Be prepared to include multimedia in your pitch,” Boston advised.

For more details and Boston’s contact info, read How To Pitch: Sister 2 Sister.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

How To Answer Tricky Job Interview Questions

We’ve all faced those questions in interviews. You know, the ones that make you hesitate, stumble, or just plain feel like you won’t get the job if you answer them incorrectly. For example:

Why did you leave your last position?

You can blame the economy, a lack of growth opportunity, the position changing dramatically after you took it, or the functions being misrepresented during your interview. But the key point here is to be honest — not just for your conscience, but for your career. “Transparency is the best policy with these types of questions,” said Matt Tovrog, a partner at Bell Oaks Executive Search, “because a former boss can easily be contacted as a reference check.”

Read more in 7 Tricky Job Interview Questions and How to Answer Them.

ag_logo_medium.gifThis article is one of several mediabistro.com features exclusively available to AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, you can register for as little as $55 a year and get access to these articles, discounts on seminars and workshops, and more.

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>