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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Lehrer’

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President Obama Met Off The Record With Conservative Journalists (HuffPost)
President Obama met Tuesday afternoon with a small group of conservative reporters, columnists and commentators for an off-the-record discussion. The group, according to a source familiar with the meeting, included Wall Street Journal editorial page editor Paul Gigot, National Review Washington editor Robert Costa, Washington Examiner columnist Byron York, syndicated columnists Kathleen Parker and Washington Post columnist and Fox News contributor Charles Krauthammer. Obama and the journalists talked for about 90 minutes in the Roosevelt room. TheWrap President Obama blamed Republicans in Congress for putting the country on the brink of financial disaster in a Tuesday press conference about the government shutdown that clocked in at more than an hour — but that wasn’t enough time for the president to take questions from TV reporters. Obama answered questions from reporters with the AP, Bloomberg, Huffington Post, Reuters, NPR, New York Times, Financial Times, Roll Call, Agence France-Presse, CBS News (though that was Mark Knoller, who is primarily a CBS Radio reporter) and Real Clear Politics. Slate / Weigel Would the press conference have been improved by some Obamacare questions? Probably. (Having given a bunch of interviews about the topic since mid-September, he was probably ready with a robotic answer.) Is the White House press corps, generally, too inclined to let the president ramble about some existential issue? Sure. Doesn’t change the fact that the shutdown blew the exchanges, and immigration reform, and basically everything else out of the news — and some conservatives predicted that would happen. TVNewser The news conference ended without any of the major broadcast TV network correspondents being called on.

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WNET Looks Back at 70s for Second Installment of Pioneers of Thirteen

Don’t put away your bell bottoms just yet!

The calendar has turned to another year, but the 50th anniversary celebration continues hasn’t ended at PBS’ Channel 13. In the second installment of the Pioneers of Thirteen, the 1970s are recalled in detail.

Three-time Oscar winner Meryl Streep narrates The ’70s – Bold and Fearless, which takes viewers into an exploration of Thirteen’s second decade on air. It was an era in public television that was defined through creative experimentation. Streep had a connection with PBS before hitting it big in movies (Oscar winner in 1979 for Kramer vs. Kramer). Look for her shining in Wendy Wasserstein‘s first play Uncommon Women and Others from 1978.

Perhaps most important to the 1970s was the political scandal by which all others would be measured going forward–Watergate.

The gavel-to-gavel coverage on WNET in 1973 brought newsmen Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer together. It was the precursor for their long-running nightly newscast.

Channel 13 also helped promote the budding career of actor Morgan Freeman (The Electric Company).

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Giants of Broadcasting Celebrates 10th Anniversary

The Library of American Broadcasting is marking its 10th year of immortalizing industry greats. The 2012 edition of the Giants of Broadcasting include two career radio executives, pioneering television newsmen, a man who made a weekly commentary “must see TV,” and a man who helped launched the 24-hour news cycle.

That man is Ted Turner. He turned an upstart CNN into a worldwide cable news powerhouse. Within six years, CNN was in the black. There were the Atlanta Braves, eventually broadcast on his new station TBS. Turner also added the Atlanta Hawks to his prospectus.

Turner, who spoke briefly in his acceptance speech, talked about his proudest moment professionally in 1990 as the Gulf War began.

“I took a nap. When I woke up, I knew the war was coming, and I knew we had our people there. I turned on the television and clicked it over to NBC and there was Tom Brokaw talking. I switched over to CBS and there was Dan Rather talking in the studio. I switched it over to ABC and there was Peter Jennings talking in the studio,” Turner boasts. “Then I flashed it over to CNN, and there was the war. As a journalist, as a television news person, wasn’t that the greatest scoop of all time?”

Another major TV executive was recognized for his body of work. Sir Howard Stringer (above) had a 30-year association with CBS. The Wales-born Stringer, after earning his B.A. and M.A. degrees at the prestigious Oxford University, arrived in New York. His first job at the Tiffany Network was an entry level clerk logging commercial times at WCBS-TV/Channel 2.

Stringer is chairman of the board at Sony Corporation. FishbowlNY spoke to Stringer at the Giants of Broadcasting event. Watch the video clip after the jump.

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Howard Stringer Still Treasures the Memory of His Lunches with Johnny Carson

What better place for Sir Howard Stringer to reminisce about the great Johnny Carson than the annual Giants of Broadcasting event?

The chairman of Sony’s board was feted at yesterday’s 10th anniversary edition in New York City alongside Norman Lear, Ted Turner, Robert MacNeil, Jim Lehrer, Eric Farber, George Beasley and – posthumously – Don Cornelius and Andy Rooney. Our FishbowlNY colleague Jerry Barmash was able to grab a few minutes with Stringer, who recalled a great fringe benefit of helping orchestrate the successful CBS pursuit of David Letterman:

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Bette Midler, Blythe Danner and Chris Noth’s Advice for President Obama

1003_mockup.gifIf you felt the tremors in midtown around noon, it’s because 55th and Fifth nearly buckled under the weight of all the star power at Michael’s today. Between the Hollywood A-listers (Bette Midler, Blythe Danner, Kate Capshaw),  Democratic dynamos (Kerry Kennedy, Betsy Gotbaum) and talking heads (Star Jones), I was getting a serious case of whiplash trying to keep track of it all.

Just when I thought the crowd had settled in, I spied Chris Noth sitting alone at the bar, and I just couldn’t resist going over for a quick chat. While Julianna Marguilies‘ errant TV husband on The Good Wife waited for his pal, producer Fred Zollo, to arrive, I got him to weigh in on the show’s headline-making sex scenes. “Network television can’t go where cable does, but I did do a scene where we showed just enough oral sex in a bathroom while cable news played in the background,” Chris told me. How could we forget? “That stuff gets people talking, I guess.” Yup.

This season, while his co-star Archie Panjabi steams up the screen, his character is trying for a shot at redemption and is running for governor. “I have no idea whether or not he wins,” says Chris. The ardent Democrat tells me he has no interest in running for office himself. “I’m not one of those actors. All my skeletons are out of the closet!” He does, however, have a keen interest in who wins this year’s presidential election. “A lady on the subway asked me to take a picture with me, and I told her I would as long she voted Democrat!” When I told Chris I was lunching with Robert Zimmerman,  a Democratic National Committee member from New York and one of the party’s top fundraisers, he perked up. “I have a line I want to give him for President Obama! Can you introduce me?” I was only too happy to oblige.

When I brought Chris over to my table to meet Robert and another smart, savvy Democratic booster, producer Joan Gelman, he told Robert, “I’ve got something for Obama: A half truth is the same as a complete lie, and we’re not even hearing half truths from Romney. You ought to pass this along for the Obama circle for  the debate.” Robert assured Chris he would get his comment to the president’s handlers.  When Chris went off to his own table, Robert said, “They ought to take his advice; he’s got a higher approval rating than both parties.”

Chris Noth and Diane Clehane

Chris Noth and Diane Clehane

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PBS Announces More Changes To Its News Lineup

hudson111.jpgYesterday’s news that Jim Lehrer‘s name will no longer be in the title for PBS‘ “NewsHour” wasn’t the only change in the non-profit network. “Newshour” was also partnering with digital media news outlet GlobalPost for international stories, and today brings news that PBS’ “Nightly Business Report” program has a new co-anchor to replace Paul Kangas.

Tom Hudson will officially take over the role as co-host on January 4, but will be eased into the transition of reporting with Susie Gharib as early as this Wednesday. Executive editor Rodney Ward was optimistic for Hudson’s arrival, saying that the former talk-radio host brings both “the old school journalistic fundamentals we cherish” as well as a Web-savviness that PBS is striving for.

Full press release after the jump.

Previously: NewsHour Partners With GlobalPost, Takes Lehrer Off Title

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NewsHour Partners With GlobalPost, Takes Lehrer Off Title

17660_logo.jpgPBS is making some big changes to its powerhouse “NewsHour” program. Starting December 7, the show will no longer be “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer”, but “PBS NewsHour”, though longtime host Jim Lehrer will stay on with the show as an executive producer.

But the title of the show and the reduction of the role of its main anchor are not the the only differences for the program: “NewsHour” will also be teaming up with digital news site GlobalPost to supplement its international coverage. With GlobalPost’s host of correspondents from around the world, Linda Winslow, executive producer of “NewsHour”, said the year-old current events site has much to offer the PBS program. “The NewsHour is committed to in-depth coverage of international news, yet we cannot to do it all ourselves,” she said in an announcement about the partnership.

The truth is, publicly funded news can only pay so much for original reporting, and striking a deal with a young digital company to provide content may be the most pragmatic way to stretch the network’s budget. Meanwhile Lehrer is realistic about stepping aside for a rotating cast of new hosts on the show, as he told Howard Kurtz of The Washington Post, “I still have the hunger…I didn’t have the hunger to do it all by myself. But I really have the hunger for it to be done, and done well.”

Press release after the jump.

Read More: PBS, changing ‘NewsHour’ to preserve itWashington Post

Previously: “Newshour” Gets An Overhaul

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Tiger Woods Scandal Captivates The Media, And The Menu, Too

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The Tiger Woods car crash and scandal was the biggest news on today’s mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast. Hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven were shocked by the amount of coverage the event has received since the weekend, noting that CNN quoted The National Enquirer about the story, a nod to the shift of the national conversation on the subject.

“There’s a certain glee that the media has when someone who is big and perfect like Tiger Woods falls,” Jason said. “They pounce ten times harder than they would if say, Britney Spears would have had the same thing happen to her over the weekend.”

“If you’re an important or famous person today, you just can’t have an affair,” Matt said. “It just can’t happen. You’re going to get busted…Shame on Tiger, who seems like a smart guy.”

Also discussed: Jim Lehrer‘s plans to leave PBS‘s “NewsHour” and Barnes & Nobles’ Nook e-readers selling for high prices on eBay.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

NPR Launches Online Local Journalism Project With $3M In Grants

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NPR announced today that it is planning to launch a new local online journalism venture with $3 million in funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

The funding — $2 million coming from CPB and $1 million from the Knight Foundation — will be used to provide a group of NPR stations with the resources to hire “journalist bloggers” who will focus on a topic that is important to the city where they are based. “Stations will feed their work into NPR’s content management system, where the entire group of participants will have easy access to each others’ work to inform, enrich and add context as they create and present their stories,” NPR said.

In addition, through the two years of the pilot program, PBS‘s “The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer” will provide participants with an embeddable video player for their Web sites, while also featuring local reporting from selected stations on the “NewsHour.”

NPR said the stations that will participate in the pilot program have not yet been selected. However, they will include a mix of radio/TV operation and public radio stations from around the country.

A full release about the venture, after the jump.

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NPR Announced New Investigative Project – Legitimizes Bloggers in the Process

We posted the whole release which is interesting and there for your perusal. What struck us is the use of the phrase “well-qualified pool of journalist bloggers.” That’s right “journalist bloggers.”

If NPR uses it – even just in their press release – it’s lexicon admitted!

NPR LAUNCHES NEW ONLINE LOCAL JOURNALISM VENTURE WITH CPB AND KNIGHT FOUNDATION FUNDING

Washington, DC, Oct.2, 2009 – NPR will launch a new journalism project to develop in-depth, local coverage on topics critical to communities and the nation, in a new effort funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the groups announced today.

The new funding – $2 million from CPB and $1 million from Knight Foundation – provides a pilot group of NPR stations with the resources to expand original reporting, and to curate, distribute and share online content about high-interest, specialized subjects. It is the first time that CPB and Knight Foundation have jointly funded a project of this type.

The two-year pilot will help a dozen stations establish themselves as definitive sources of news on a topic selected by each one as most relevant to its community, such as city politics, the changing economy, health care, immigration or education. These online reports will help fill the growing gap in local news offerings.

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