TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Michael J. Fox.’

Reverse Discrimination? Mr. Golden Globe Getting a Lot Less Press Than Miss Golden Globe

If not for the Wall Street Journal, it would be almost impossible these past few days to realize that there will actually be two celebrity offspring officially helping out at Sunday’s Golden Globes.

Clint Eastwood‘s 19-year-old daughter Francesca (Miss Golden Globe) is all over the media map, confessing 25 things people don’t know about her to US magazine, five similar tidbits to ABC News and getting tons more ink from the likes of ET and The Daily Mail. Sam Fox on the other hand (Mr. Golden Globe, pictured), a 23-year-old chip off the old Michael J. block, must make MSM-do with some WSJ coverage. But at least in that article he’s properly accounted for:

Fox, who lives in the West Village, is the director of business development and strategy at Farmers Web, a startup platform for small and medium-size farms to sell goods to restaurants and other wholesale buyers. “I’ve always been interested in food,” said Fox, whose uncle Michael Pollan wrote The Omnivore’s Dilemma. “Right now I’m really into kale.”

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Overcoming Writer's Block

Overcoming Writer's BlockUse proven tools and exercises to get back to writing! Starting July 15, learn a process that will help you pinpoint your optimal writing conditions, structure your time and build a framework to increase your productivity. Register now! 

NBC Validates ‘The Michael J. Fox Exception’

In this week’s edition of TV Guide magazine, LA bureau chief Michael Schneider has the lowdown on how actor Michael J. Fox’s return to NBC series work came to pass earlier this month. It all happened incredibly quickly.

The prime time sitcom will be loosely based on Fox’s family life and dealings with Parkinson’s disease. Schneider writes that instead of the usual two-week pitch process, it took just two days for Fox and his project partners – Sony Pictures Television, producers Will Gluck and Sam Laybourne – to consummate a deal:

That’s partly because NBC’s whopping [guaranteed] 22-episode order was too big to ignore — and too much for the other networks to match. Major episodic commitments were a bit more common in the 1990s, but the networks long ago stopped making such risky, pricy bets. But a show starring an icon like Fox doesn’t come along every day. Gluck calls it “The Michael J. Fox Exception.”

Read more

Writer Drives Digital Truck Through 1980s Movie Plot Holes

Denver radio host, author, and Salon.com contributor David Sirota recently combed over some beloved 1980s movie classics. The trigger for the piece was a revelation by Back to the Future writer Bob Gale.

Sirota runs through ten different big-hair decade cinematic favorites, asking in each case an “Unanswered question,” followed by “What remains unknown” and his “Theory” as to what the plot hole explanation might be. Among his targets are the aforementioned Gale opus, Ghostbusters, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, and another Michael J. Fox milepost, 1985′s Teen Wolf:

Unanswered Question: How did a wolfman manage to attend high school without media scrutiny and a political firestorm?

Theory: The school board, at the urging of the school’s wolf-hating vice principal Rusty Thorne, briefly considered banning Scott from school. However, Scott’s father, Harold–who had faced similar persecution during his teenage years–was already ready with a federal lawsuit against such a move. In a closed-door meeting immediately after Scott outs himself, Harold threatens the school board with a long drawn out court battle over civil rights statues and the “equal protection” clause of the constitution. The school board quickly relents, citing budget deficits…

Read more

Cosby Show, Family Ties and Regis Philbin Among Honorees at TV Land Awards in New York

For the first time in its nine-year history, the TV Land Awards pulled up stakes in Los Angeles and headed for New York, bringing a Big Apple feel to the Javits Center last night.

The Cosby Show, set in Brooklyn and taped in New York, was honored with the Impact Award. The cast, including co-creator Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad, reunited.

“It means that not only are we still relevent today…We made some sort of a difference, and some sort of an impact 25 years ago,” Sabrina LeBeauf (above) , who played Sondra on the hit sitcom, tells FishbowlNY.

The Cosby Show, which helped resurrect NBC from 1984 to 1992, had another “impact” on television viewing.

“I don’t see any show on now that impacts people in that way… [that] family show [did],” Geoffrey Owens (who played Elvin) says. “I think it’s fair to say that, unfortunately, that’s a little bit … of the past right now.”

Read more

TV Land Awards Coming To New York

For the first time, the TV Land Awards, which honors past favorites of the medium, is moving to New York.

The ninth annual awards are scheduled to be taped and aired in April. The location has not been announced.

The program, which specializes in reunions of classic TV casts, will bring back The Cosby Show complete cast, including stars Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad. The show will receive the Impact Award.

Michael J. Fox will also be in attendance, reuniting with his 1980s sitcom family from Family Ties. That show is being honored with the Fan Favorite Award.

The TV Land Awards also recognize current shows as ”Future Classics.”

Inside The Time 100 Party

America Ferrera and John Mayer

It’s arguably the most exclusive magazine party of the year. (Graydon Carter‘s Vanity’s Fair Oscar party perhaps being the other.) John Edwards mingled with John Mayer. Sir Richard Branson (just back from dogsledding in Alaska) commandeered the corner of the bar like a Virgin spaceship, and allowed Henry Kissinger to ride co-pilot. Craigslist’s Craig Newmark chatted up Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales. New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick walked through the cocktail hour unrecognized. Michael J. Fox, too, virtually unnoticed, chatted with Elizabeth Vargas near the glass window overlooking Central Park. Arianna Huffington was noticed. (Line uttered in every pre-dinner conversation: “Is that someone? It looks like someone, I don’t know … do you?”)

Time Warner execs — like Richard Parsons and Jeffrey Bewkes — buzzed along the edges as the usual media-on-media action (including Ad Age‘s Nat Ives, WWD‘s Stephanie Smith, Jossip’s David Hauslaib, New York mag’s Jesse Oxfeld, Gawker’s Lockhart Steele and Doree Shafrir, ETP’s Rachel Sklar, Glynnis MacNicol, Julia Allison, Radar‘s Jeff Bercovici, NYO‘s Michael Calderone) made nice use of the open bar.

But as much firepower as there was at last night’s Time 100 party at Jazz at Lincoln Center, just 36 of the 100 to make 2007′s “most influential people in the world” list made it, and there were plenty of notable no-shows: No Obama. No Borat. No Queen of England. Rosie. No Leo. No Gore. No Timberlake. No Tyra.

But impassioned speeches — delivered over dinner by Elizabeth Edwards, Brian Williams, Bloomberg (with an ode to late Boston Celtics’ exec Red Auerbach — huh?) Branson and others — and a three-song set by Mayer more than made up for the relative lack of A-listers.

Others spotted during cocktail hour: Cate Blanchett, Mayor Bloomberg, Queen Rania Al-Abdullah of Jordan, Simon Fuller, Charlie Rose, Tina Fey, Mario Cuomo, Martha Stewart, Brian Grazer, Gayle King (no Oprah), Matt Lauer, Chris Matthews, Brian Williams, Ziyi Zhang, Police Commisioner Ray Kelly, Suzanne Vega, Harvey Weinstein, David Lauren and Lauren Bush.

FishbowlNY’s Coverage Of Last Year’s Time 100:

  • Inside the Time 100 Party
  • Diddy’s Time 100 Posse Bigger Than Most Posses
  • Time 100: The Most Influential People in the Room

    More photos:

    Read more

  • Lunch at Michael’s: Wesley Clark & A Model Mystery

    lunch_at_michaels_logo.jpgWe missed Jane Fonda by a day. Today’s lunch crowd was lacking the star power we’ve come to expect on our weekly visits so while we were disappointed our usual perch at the bar had been usurped by an unidentified exec, we didn’t miss much from our less than stellar seat a few stools down. We were, though, happy to spot our pal Jack Kliger. Lunchtime chronicler Diane Clehane chatted up the Hachette honcho about the latest celebrity implosion that’s got everyone buzzing — the Rosie O’Donnell trainwreck that left the station at Monday’s Matrix Awards and crashed and burned with today’s surprise announcement that she is leaving The View in mid-June due to a reported contract dispute.

    Kliger was among the stunned crowd of media elite that had to suffer through O’Donnell’s profane performance as emcee of the event that had her soon to be ex-boss Barbara Walters laying her face in her hands from her seat on the dais alongside such luminaries as Hillary Clinton and Arianna Huffington. “It was absolutely disgusting,” he said, adding that the editors from Woman’s Day and other Hachette books at his table were equally sickened by the comedian’s performance. The veteran magazine executive, who knows a thing or two about working with celebrities (remember George?), says it was O’Donnell’s ill-fated stint helming her own magazine was the “turning point” against launching further titles with stars moonlighting as editors. “We’ve learned that you can cover celebrities without giving celebrities their own magazine.” For every Oprah, says Kliger, there are scores of over-inflated egos and Hollywood headcases that are deluded into thinking they can run a magazine. “I was getting at least a proposal week,” he recalls of those days when O’Donnell was still masquerading as “The Queen of Nice.” Everyone from Jennifer Lopez to Jane Pauley(“she was talking to everyone”) was interested in adding the title of editor-in-chief to their resumes — with no personal investment, of course, he recalls. Long before the 2,000 attendees of Matrix witnessed what seemed like O’Donnell’s latest effort at career suicide, Kliger told fellow publishing bigwigs they were crazy to tie their bottom line to the star. “She’s a time bomb.” No kidding.

    The rest of the crowd:

    Read more