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Posts Tagged ‘Molly Jong Fast’

Alexis Glick Dishes with Michelle Paterson, NY Republican Chair Talks Turner Victory

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It was SRO at Michael’s today. The dining room was a tasty mix of media mavens with a heaping helping of politicos and a dash of flash with a very tall L.A. Laker. (We don’t follow basketball, but several guys in the room made sure we knew it was Matt Barnes who made heads turn.)

I was joined by Andrew Amill, VP of media sales at Weight Watchers, who, unlike many of his colleagues in publishing is seeing some extraordinary numbers these days. “This is a record year in the history of the brand driven by The Points Plus system and [spokesperson] Jennifer Hudson,” Andy tells me. The numbers speak for themselves: Newsstand sales are up 10 percent;  print ad revenue is up eight percent. Online, the business is exploding with an impressive 25 percent jump in ad revenue.

As a lifetime members of Weight Watchers, I told Andy I’d been a longtime fan of the brand but was really impressed by their canny selection of Hudson as a spokesperson. “She has a lot of credibility with members and readers,” says Andy, and that’s translated into plenty of new members who have joined because of the amazing results the Oscar winner got from the program. In fact, the cover of this month’s issue features an attractive array of men and women, ‘real life success stories’ that attest to the program’s sweeping success. This is definitely not your mother’s Weight Watchers.

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1.  Atttorney Rob Barnett, presiding over a table of business types

2.  Wayne Kabak and Lauren Green

3. Oxygen Media founder Geraldine Laybourne

4. Producer Francine LeFrak and some colorfully dressed social swells

Read more

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Erica Jong’s Big Mistake: Suing Julia Phillips

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Erica Jong trashes Oscar-winning producer Julia Phillips without naming her in a HuffPo interview:

Fear of Flying had been taken over by a woman who was a drug addict, and who was not a director, but decided she wanted to direct it herself. And I sued to stop her, and get the rights back, and it cost me a fortune, and I didn’t win, and it really hurt me badly for the rest of my career.

Phillips might not have been a director, and she was a heavy drug user by her own admission, but she did produce Close Encounters of the Third Kind and The Sting for which she won an Oscar. She had a deal to produce and direct at Columbia. Jong wraps herself in self-righteousness, invoking those arbitrageurs of all things moral, the French:

…the French have something called droit morale, where you can’t buy a book as if it were a sack of sugar, and take possession of it. The author of the book has to approve the movie that’s made from her book.

Which is why Julian Schnabel adapted a book whose author is conveniently dead.

Phillips got her own back, though, writing of Jong:

looks like Miss Piggy when her face is in repose

Phillips, who died in 2002, also said that Flying didn’t make it to the screen, due to Hollywood’s male-dominated power structure.

Last spring, rumors floated that Diane English was adapting the novel for Maggie Gyllenhaal.

Jong also gasses on about how swell things are in Europe for authors:

I think that our laws of intellectual property are not nearly as forward looking as what exists in Europe and exists in the Berne Convention

But she used to complain that she didn’t get royalties:

My books were huge bestsellers in Yugoslavia before the war,I would walk down the streets of Dubrovnik and people would yell, “Erica Yong, I love you!” But publishers went out of business. I never received a single zloty.

A zloty is the currency of Poland, and she probably didn’t get any of those, either.