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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Stengel’

Pulitzer Journo Barton Gellman Joins Time

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TIME magazine has hired two-time Pulitzer Prize winning Washington Post journalist Barton Gellman as both the new editor at large and columnist for a new feature called “Counterspy.” Before TIME, Gellman spent two decades at the Post, where he covered topics ranging from the Gulf War to the AIDS epidemic. In addition to working on Counterspy — which will focus on privacy in the digital age — Gellman will be working in conjunction with NYU Law School, where he has been appointed senior research fellow and will oversee a new journalism program.

Memo from TIME Managing Editor Richard Stengel below.

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Awaiting The Tablet…

yerba.pngAs we await the (seemingly inevitable) unveiling of Apple’s Tablet this afternoon, here’s a look at some things you may want to consider:

Advertising Age today points out that even if the tablet isn’t the media industry savior everyone is hoping for, at least Apple will be spending lots of money on advertising in the coming months — no matter what they plan to announce today.

– We looked at the future of e-readers, including the tablet, as we looked towards the New Year.

– And Time magazine editor Richard Stengel told us he sees e-readers as “opening a new door for a struggling industry.”

– And look! Even more magazines are plotting tablet versions. But will they make money?

Follow more coverage of today’s big announcement at our sister site, eBookNewser.

Previously: It’s Apple Tablet Day On The Menu

Time Names New Design Director

dwtime1.jpgOn New Year’s Eve day, Time magazine announced the promotion of D.W. Pine to the position of design director of the weekly magazine.

Pine will be replacing longtime art director Arthur Hochstein, who Pine had worked under as a deputy for nine years. In a memo to the staff, managing editor Richard Stengel praised Pine for his work for the magazine, including designing more than 30 covers, working as art director for the special Michael Jackson issue this summer and overseeing Time‘s “efforts on the new tablet digital platform.”

Pine, a former sportswriter, joined Time from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, where he was features design director, Stengel said.

“As a designer, he is always seeing around corners–and he gets more done in a day than anyone I know,” Stengel added. “D.W.’s work has a strong, clean, and spare esthetic and he has one of the great all-time Time temperaments: he’s never ruffled. He seems to come by this disposition naturally; his parents were subscribers who used to keep Time covers in a 3-ring binder.”

Hochstein, who Pine is replacing, was named art director in 1994 and had served under seven managing editors during his long career at Time. He is retiring but will continue to work for the magazine as a contributing designer.

Stengel’s full memo, after the jump

Related: Time‘s Stengel “Bullish” On E-Reader Content For 2010

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Time‘s Stengel: “Bullish” On e-Reader Content For 2010

personoftheyear.jpgNow that we’ve laid out the whole e-reader dilemma facing news content providers, we want to get into the nitty gritty. What do those on the front lines — the editors of the content that we read — think about the future of e-readers and digital content?

Richard Stengel, the managing editor of Time magazine, liked our representation of e-readers as “opening a new door for a struggling industry.”

“We have something like 10,000 subscribers to Time on the Kindle, in a form that’s not anywhere near what the tablets will be and the e-readers will be, and that tells me something,” Stengel told FishbowlNY.

“People are paying for content on these devices…And I think if you provide something of value to people, something that’s different but something that is core to your brand, I think people will find value in it and will pay for it. So I do think that it is a door opening for our industry.”

So what is Time working on exactly? Stengel was mum on specifics. (Time‘s publisher Time Inc. is part of the recently announced consortium working to develop a new e-reader format.)

“I don’t want to over-promise and under deliver, but we’ve been working on it for a while and we will have something interesting to show in the New Year,” he said. “And I’m very bullish on it. I think the e-reader is a new form of content…and I think the challenge for all of us is to figure out how to produce something that really has a new and added value to readers and subscribers. We’re definitely on top of that and you’ll see something [from us] in the not too distant future.”

Previously: Time‘s Stengel Explains Bernanke Choice For Person Of The Year

Time‘s Stengel Explains Bernanke Choice For Person Of The Year

personoftheyear.jpgTime magazine’s managing editor Richard Stengel has had a busy day. He was at the “Today” show first thing in the morning to announce this year’s Person of the Year (it’s Ben Bernanke if you haven’t already heard) and then he spent the rest of the day talking to various news outlets about the choice. We got a chance to ask him, too, why Bernanke?

“It’s a way of telling a larger story,” Stengel explained. “One of the things I like for Time to do is take some very large and complex issue and explain it for readers. And in a way, that is what Mike Grunwald‘s story does. When you learn something as a reporter or writer, the first thing you want to do is explain it to someone, and that’s the tone of the whole article. I really like that for our readers and I think people will get a lot out of it. For me, Bernanke was the best vehicle to talk about the largest, most macroeconomic issues.”

But what about the Twitter guys, who were so popular among the speakers at the Time Person of the Year debate last month?

“The Twitter thing came on strong there,” Stengel said of the debate. “And we did really think about it, but we had done a story on them a little but earlier and because we did “You” and user-generated content a few years ago [as Person of the Year] I felt like we had kind of covered that territory a bit.”

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Time Names Bernanke Person Of The Year

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Time magazine’s managing editor Richard Stengel was on the “Today” show this morning to (finally) announce the magazine’s Person of the Year: Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke.

personoftheyear.jpgThe Person of the Year issue, due on newsstands on Friday, features the first full, on-the-record print interview with Bernanke since he was named chairman of the Fed. Said Stengel of the cover and cover story: “It’s a throwback cover. It’s like a Person of the Year cover from the 1940′s or 50′s. It’s a great, great story by our senior correspondent Michael Grunwald. And it’s basically about who is influencing how the economy operates.”

Adds Grunwald in the magazine:

“The main reason Ben Shalom Bernanke is Time‘s Person of the Year for 2009 is that he is the most important player guiding the world’s most important economy. His creative leadership helped ensure that 2009 was a period of weak recovery rather than catastrophic depression, and he still wields unrivaled power over our money, our jobs, our savings and our national future.”

The Person of the Year package also includes interviews with the Person of the Year runners-up: Nancy Pelosi, General Stanley McChrystal, Usain Bolt and “the Chinese worker,” — represented by five factory workers in China.

Read more: Person of the Year 2009Time

Previously: Gearing Up For Time‘s Person Of The Year Announcement

Gearing Up For Time‘s Person Of The Year Announcement

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

We’ve been waiting — patiently! — for the announcement of Time magazine’s Person of the Year since attending a debate on the matter hosted by the magazine last month.

Then, on Friday, we learned that Time managing editor Richard Stengel would be making the big announcement live on Wednesday on the “Today” show. Today and tomorrow, the morning show will be doing features on the Person of the Year lists to get us even more excited for the big reveal. Hopefully we won’t be sick of Stengel and this whole waiting game by then. (Stengel was on today and will be back Wednesday, but he won’t be there tomorrow, we’re told.)

Today, Stengel narrowed a previously released top ten list of contenders to a “shortlist” of seven. Looks like Time‘s person is going to be one of these: Steve Jobs, Ben Bernanke, Nancy Pelosi, General Stanley McChrystal, Usain Bolt, Barack Obama or “the Chinese worker.”

And although the top person has already been chose by Time‘s top brass, you can still cast your vote for your choice.

We’re still disappointed to see the Twitter guys missing from this shortlist. What do you think?

Previously: Will Twitter Be Time‘s Person Of The Year?

Will Twitter Be Time‘s Person Of The Year?

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Time Managing Editor Richard Stengel, Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravesnthal, Barbara Walters and Tom Colicchio. Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Time Inc.

Last night, Time magazine managing editor Richard Stengel hosted a distinguished panel of guests to debate the question that always surfaces around this time of year: who should be Time‘s Person of the Year?

Stengel co-moderated the good-natured debate with former New York City Mayor Rudy GiulianiTime‘s Person of the Year in 2001. Panelists like Barbara Walters were encouraged to bring lists of possible Person of the Year candidates who met the title’s criteria, which includes having a global impact in the past year, for better or worse.

After running through lists of possible Person of the Year winners that included Bernie Madoff, Captain “Sully” Sullenberger and the Iranian protesters, the six-person panel ended the night in a three-three split. Walters agreed with TV personality Dr. Mehmet Oz and Gayle King that “the guys from Twitter,” meaning Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams and Biz Stone, should take the prize. Giuliani, “Top Chef” judge Tom Colicchio and Pittsburgh mayor Luke Ravensthal all voted for “the economy,” settling on some amalgam of Ben Bernanke and the unemployed American worker as Person of the Year.

Stengel didn’t give any hints about who would end up the final winner later this year, but we’ll see in a few weeks when the Person of the Year issue hits newsstands.

Read on for more of the panel’s suggestions.

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Time Managing Editor Richard Stengel On The Menu: “One Or Two Brands Will Always Survive”

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It was a big show for a Monday morning on today’s mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast.

Time magazine’s managing editor Richard Stengel joined hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy‘s Matt Van Hoven to talk about the media industry, Time and surviving the recession.

Despite talk of the impending death of weekly news magazines, Time has been doing well recently, no doubt thanks to this summer’s two “bookazines” about Michael Jackson and Sen. Ted Kennedy.

“In so many industries…one or two brands will always survive,” Stengel said about Time‘s success. “The combination of having a very strong brand and doing something that is very valuable, and even indispensable to some people, is making us very strong right now.”

Stengel also talked about Time‘s commitment to national service. The magazine is promoting the cause and dedicating an issue of the magazine to it.

“I certainly think of Time as a public trust, and I think what we do as journalists is a form of service and a form of civic engagement,” he said. “I’ve thought from the beginning, when I became editor, that this is one of the ideas that we can embrace. It has nothing to do with a political party or political persuasion. It has everything to do with citizenship…And we could also cover the movement and how service is changing. It doesn’t affect the way we cover the news at all, but it does put a halo around your brand in a sense.”

Also discussed: Stengel’s take on the Time brand and its audience in today’s media environment. “Whatever form something takes from the Time brand…it has that essential DNA of Time,” he said.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

John Brady and FBLA Are in Total Agreeance

84400026.jpg John Brady has a piece in Folio about Time magazine and Joel Stein. Brady writes:

Does anyone here remember that wonderful year 1996, when Time magazine did a redesign that caused a reader revolt? Well, I remember it well. One element in the failed repositioning of the newsweekly was a recent staffer, Joel Stein, who was the magazine’s novelty item just before the collapse. Stein specialized in news lite-hot dog eating contests, stuff like that.

When the magazine regrouped, Stein was missing in action.

Now, under the editorship of Richard Stengel (who signs his Editor’s welcome column “Rick”), Joel Stein is not only back; he is riding higher than ever as the magazine sinks to new lows.

Ouch. Then Brady attempts to be diplomatic:

Look, Stein is Stein. I’m not picking on him so much as I am wondering why Time turns over so much of its space and its reputation to someone so frivolous and unfunny…

Totally! We ask the same question of the LA Times when they publish him. We blame them. It’s not the kid’s fault for kicking the back of your seat the entire five hour flight – it’s the parents’ fault for giving him Starbucks and proximity.

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