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Posts Tagged ‘The New Yorker’

Morning Media Newsfeed: García Márquez Dead at 87 | Whoopi Gets New Gig | Wallace Re-Signs

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Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel Laureate, Dies at 87 (GalleyCat)
Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez passed away Thursday. He was 87 years old. Time The Nobel Prize-winning author was hospitalized for nine days in late March for an infection in his lungs and urinary tract. He had been recovering in his home in Mexico City since April 8. NYT His death was confirmed by Cristóbal Pera, his former editor at Random House. García Márquez, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982, wrote fiction rooted in a mythical Latin American landscape of his own creation, but his appeal was universal. His books were translated into dozens of languages. He was among a select roster of canonical writers — Dickens, Tolstoy and Hemingway among them — who were embraced both by critics and a mass audience. The Guardian Journalists gathered outside García Márquez’s house in Mexico City in the hope that one of the family members who was reportedly at his side would emerge. Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto expressed sadness at the death of “one of the greatest writers of our time,” in the name of Mexico, the novelist’s adopted home. Chilean writer Luis Sepúlveda was quoted by the Mexican newspaper Reforma as saying that he was “the most important writer in Spanish of the 20th century.” WSJ Born in the sleepy town of Aracataca, Colombia, García Márquez was best known for his 1967 masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude. In a career spanning more than 60 years, García Márquez wrote some of the Spanish language’s most revered books, many of which became best sellers in the U.S. They included Autumn of The Patriarch, Chronicle of A Death Foretold, Love in The Time of Cholera and The General in His Labyrinth. García Márquez was also an accomplished journalist, whose lyrical, deeply reported stories first caught the eye of readers in Colombia’s capital, Bogotá, in the early 1950s. He later became renowned not only his profiles of presidents and despots but for the real-life close ties he cultivated with leaders ranging from Fidel Castro to Bill Clinton to François Mitterrand.

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Wily Chefs Surprise Wylie Dufresne

WylieDufresnePicNew Yorker reporter Sophie Brickman tells readers to think of the three covert days spent in Brooklyn by 20 world-class culinary artists as The Real World: Chef’s Edition. And that’s just the tip of the analogous iceberg. FishbowlNY while reading also saw visions of Real House Chefs of Williamsburg, Undercover Sauce, America’s Got Imported Talent and more.

Two years in the making, the top-secret 72-hour assembly of world class restaurant chefs was for the purposes of honoring one of their molecular gastronomy own, Wylie Dufresne (pictured), with a surprise birthday celebration. It all went down successfully last night:

They’d focus on three of Dufresne’s signature dishes: shrimp noodles, cold fried chicken and scrambled egg ravioli, a cube-like concoction made of scrambled eggs encased in a sheath of egg yolk. They’d form cooking groups, pick their dishes and converge at wd~50 on a Tuesday, when the restaurant was closed. At the appointed hour, someone would call Dufresne to inform him that the restaurant was flooded. When he came rushing over, he’d arrive to the party of his dreams.

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Toby Young Ponders Tina Brown’s ‘Galactic Chutzpah’

TheSpectatorLogoSome of the contextualizing is questionable. But overall, Toby Young‘s The Spectator essay about the money-losing media trail trodden by Tina Brown and his companion commentary for The Daily Telegraph are thrillingly thought-provoking.

From The Spectator piece:

Take the case of Tina Brown, a New Yorker whose business ventures have lost far more than L’Wren Scott’s ever did, but who is completely inured to these setbacks because of her posh English upbringing… You won’t find Tina retiring to a darkened room with a bottle of whiskey and a revolver. On the contrary, she’s just signed a contract with Doubleday to write her memoirs — the appropriately titled Media Beast. Failure is just another career opportunity for her, which has always been the British way. As Winston Churchill said, ‘Success is going from one failure to the next with no loss of enthusiasm.’

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Cover Battle: The New Yorker or Allure

Welcome back to another edition of FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This round features The New Yorker taking on Allure. We chose The New Yorker because it reminds us of spring, a time when it (supposedly) doesn’t snow every single f*cking day and the sun (allegedly) shines.

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The Awl Hires Matt Buchanan from The New Yorker [Updated]

TheAwlLogoIt’s a big day for The Awl. The site, which began looking for a new editor months ago, might have finally found one in Matt Buchanan, who left The New Yorker to come aboard. One doesn’t just leave The New Yorker without the promise of something big, do they? As of now, there’s no word on exactly what Buchanan will be doing at The Awl.

Further muddying the waters is the fact that John Herrman is joining Buchanan at The Awl. As Capital New York notes, Buchanan and Herrman worked together at BuzzFeed’s tech vertical, and both are former Gizmodo editors.

Maybe Buchanan isn’t The Awl’s new editor, and he’s teaming up with Herrman to launch a new tech site for The Awl? Or maybe Buchanan is The Awl’s new editor and Herrman is heading up the new tech site by himself? Or maybe they were both hired because they make excellent smoothies???

Those are all legitimate questions. We’re reached out to Choire Sicha, The Awl’s founder, for answers. We’ll update when we hear back.

Update (10:08 am):
Sicha, in a note on The Awl, explained that Buchanan and Herrman will both be running The Awl, starting next month. There will not be a tech vertical. Click through for Sicha’s full memo.

Barry Blitt Honors The Oscars

For the his latest New Yorker cover, Barry Blitt honors the upcoming Academy Awards with a nip-and-tucked Oscar. Blitt gave the award a slew of upgrades, including “chin work,” “neck work,” and something scary called a “freshened nape.”

Nice work by Blitt, but our favorite Academy Award New Yorker cover was one from Bruce McCall. In 2012, McCall drew giant Oscars getting blitzed to celebrate winning several tiny human statues. See it below.

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On Lacrosse Fields Then and in Journalism Now, Vet Tells Students It’s All About ‘Pure Substitution Effect’

Sabrina Szteinbaum, associate news editor of student newspaper The Daily Targum, has a good summary of a speech given Tuesday to Rutgers journalism students by Lincoln Caplan.

LincolnCaplanPicCaplan’s credentials are impeccable: staff writer for the New Yorker; editor-in-chief of Legal Affairs; White House fellow; and more. To frame the current changes affecting journalism, he chose to go back to the days when he frequented the playing fields of Rutgers and other universities as a member of Harvard’s lacrosse team:

The first time Caplan played for Harvard against Rutgers in that lacrosse game, the players used old wooden sticks made by Native Americans. These asymmetrical sticks were tricky to balance.

The next year he played in a game against the university, players began using newly manufactured plastic sticks, which were easier for players to balance making the game faster and more exciting.

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Media Critic Reacts to Rumored O Magazine Change: WHAAAAA???

OMagazineOprahHere’s how The Huffington Post’s Jack Mirkinson calibrates a report by the Post‘s Richard Johnson that Oprah Winfrey – on the heels of a perceived Oscar nominations snub for The Butler – is thinking of permanently removing herself from O magazine cover consideration:

WHAAAAA??? O magazine without Oprah on the cover? That’s like Time magazine without stories about animal minds, or The New Yorker without random covers on springtime, or Vogue without Photoshop!

How else are we going to know what Oprah looks like with an Afro wig, or drinking smoothies with Dr. Oz or posing in front of flowers and other green things?

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New Yorker Cover Pokes Fun at Chris Christie’s Bridge Scandal

When Barry Blitt described his latest New Yorker cover, he explained, “I’m hoping this cartoon diverts a lot of traffic to my website.”

Well said, Barry. Well said.

New Yorker‘s First 2014 Cover is a Gem

originalAnnouncing the winner of our annual Cover of The Year contest has us in the magazine cover spirit. So it’s nice to see that The New Yorker has started 2014 off right, with a great illustration by Chris Ware.

Ware writes that the cover — titled “All Together Now” — shows how some people are addicted to documenting special moments, instead of merely experiencing them live:

Sometimes, I’ve noticed with horror that the memories I have of things like my daughter’s birthday parties or the trips we’ve taken together are actually memories of the photographs I took, not of the events themselves, and together, the two somehow become ever more worn and overwrought, like lines gone over too many times in a drawing. The more we give over of ourselves to these devices, the less of our own minds it appears we exercise, and worse, perhaps even concomitantly, the more we coddle and covet the devices themselves.

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