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Posts Tagged ‘WWD’

David Yi Named WWD Men’s Editor [Corrected]

David Yi has been named reporter, men’s, the new men’s editor at WWD. Yi comes to WWD with plenty of experience in the fashion world.

Yi’s work has been featured in Esquire, Elle, The Wall Street Journal, Vogue, Details and more. He has also served as a stylist for Capitol Records and a consultant for Harper’s Bazaar.

Yi is succeeding David Lipke, who left WWD in December.

We’re reached out to Yi and WWD for comment. We’ll update when we hear back.

Correction (11:11 am):
WWD has informed us that Yi has joined the company, but his title is reporter, men’s. Yi is not the men’s editor, as we previously reported.

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WWD Makes Several Editorial Changes

Ed Nardoza, editor-in-chief of Women’s Wear Daily, just sent out a memo announcing a slew of changes to the editorial team. Below are the highlights, followed by Nardoza’s full memo.

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Two Promotions at Fairchild Fashion Media

Fairchild Fashion Media has announced two promotions. Brett Mitchell has been named advertising manager for M magazine, and Ellie Ghadimi has been named advertising director, beauty, for WWD and Beauty Inc.

Mitchell has been with FFM since 2002. He has spent most of that time building up the men’s business at WWD.

Ghadimi joined FFM four years ago and most recently worked as WWD’s finance and luxury good director.

Paul Jowdy Promoted to VP, Group Publisher of WWD Group

With cuts come reshuffling. And so it comes as little surprise that Condé Nast has just named Paul Jowdy vice president, group publisher of WWD Group and M.

Jowdy is essentially taking on added duties since Marc Berger was let go, a move we mentioned this morning.

Jowdy had been WWD’s vice president and publisher since November of 2011. He will continue to report to Will Schenck, Fairchild Fashion Media’s chief revenue officer.

WWD Updates iPhone App

WWD has updated its iPhone app. The new version is now available in Apple’s app store, and will make use of Apple’s subscription system, which pushes new issues to users’ phones automatically. Other features include a streaming newsfeed and expanded slideshow content.

“As industry leaders and decision-makers, our readers need to be able to access WWD immediately, easily and from anywhere,” said Edward Nardoza, editor-in-chief of WWD. “The new iPhone edition furthers our ability to keep them connected with our news and fashion coverage throughout the day.”

The WWD iPhone app is free for print subscribers. Non-subscribers can purchase an iPad and iPhone subscription for $12.99 per month or $129.99 per year.

Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia Names New Senior VP, Publisher

Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia has appointed Alison Adler Matz senior vice president and publisher of MSLO’s Everyday Food and Whole Living brands.

Matz has a wealth of experience that includes WWD, Brides, Glamour, Teen Vogue, and House and Garden.

A highly accomplished media executive, Matz joins MSLO from Fairchild Fashion Media, where she was publisher of WWD Beauty Inc.

Prior to that, she held leadership roles at several Condé Nast publications, becoming publisher of Brides, after having served as associate publisher at Glamour, Teen Vogue and House and Garden.

MSLO’s chief revenue officer Joe Lagani said, “Alison is the consummate sales professional with a rich range of experience that will serve Everyday Food and Whole Living very well as we bring together our clients with our passionately engaged readers, viewers, users and listeners. I’m looking forward to working with her as we continue to build and expand these exciting, young brands.”

Earlier in her career, Matz was associate publisher of US Weekly.

WWD Launches iPad App

Lots of apps being released these days.

Women’s Wear Daily has released an iPad app that features a digital edition of the paper, delivered daily at 12:01am EST, in addition to features like enhanced article view, slide shows with bonus images not available in the paper, and a live feed with news from WWD.com’s “EYE” section.

“We have a global readership who relies on WWD to arm them with the news they need for the upcoming day,” said Ed Nardoza, editor-in-chief. “This app delivers our content in a mobile format that allows for access anytime, anywhere.”

WWD’s iPad App is available for download from Apple’s App Store. For existing print or online subscribers, the iPad edition is free of charge as part of their subscription. Non-subscribers can purchase a bundled  subscription including print, digital and iPad for $169 or just the iPad only subscription for $129.99 for the year or $12.99 monthly.

The paper is expanding in other ways as well. Last Wednesday it launched a weekly new column called ChinaFile by Huang Hung who is being hailed as China’s Anna Wintour.

WSJ’s Alan Murray: ‘We are suffering from guilt by association’

As the fallout from the phone hacking scandal continues, The Wall Street Journal has desperately tried to maintain its autonomy from News Corporation. Unfortunately, when editorials that read like a press release are published within its pages, it makes things a little difficult for everyone there to do that (even if they don’t like the editorial).

Alan Murray, the paper’s Deputy Managing Editor, and a few other Journal staffers spoke to WWD today and expressed their frustration with the situation. Murray defended the Journal, even adding that Rupert Murdoch has made it a better place:

We do feel we are suffering from guilt by association. My feeling, and that of many here, is that this is in many ways a better paper than it was four years ago, and Rupert Murdoch and Les Hinton both deserve great credit for investing in us and supporting and encouraging good journalism here.

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WWD Profiles ‘Dude-itors’

Oh holy crap. WWD might have just published the weirdest media article in months today. In a profile of Hugo Lindgren, Adam Rapoport and Josh Tyrangiel, WWD uses a form of “dude” 17 times and, because they do things like wear jeans, dubs the three men “Dude-itors.”

Yes, that’s right. Dude-itors.

Why are they considered so manly? The examples are endless! How about the time when Rapoport complained about a Starbucks lid? Or the fact that none of them wear glasses like the (obviously) un-manly Adam Moss? And let’s not forget that they listen to that zany rock music (specifically Ric Ocasek, who at 62 years-old, refuses to stop rocking).

Had enough Man for today? Probably. But If you haven’t, and want to read the entire piece, go right ahead.

In the meantime we’ll be here attempting to understand how a piece like that gets posted without at least one editor asking, “Dude, what the hell?”

UPDATE:
Ann Friedman has a great take on the WWD piece.

Photo Editors Discuss Iconic Situation Room Photo, Get it Wrong

WWD asked some very fancy people what they thought of the now famous Situation Room photograph shown here. Almost every single one mentions Hillary Clinton as the most pivotal part of the picture, but they all saw something that wasn’t there.

Here’s a quick rundown of their thoughts:

Kira Pollack, Director of Photography, Time:

The Hillary Clinton expression is the one that holds the photograph fully. The reaction of her hand over her face. Her eyes. Clearly, she’s reacting to something she’s watching. She’s very unaware she’s being photographed. To me, the whole image is about Hillary.

Scott Hal, Director of Photography, Newsweek:

What’s most interesting to me about this photo is what you’re not seeing. The mystery of what’s happening off camera is captured wholly in the expression on Hillary’s face.

Michelle McNally, Assistant Managing Editor for Photography, The New York Times:

It’s pretty simple. It’s just the intense expression on Obama and Hillary’s faces.

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