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Obituaries

Gabriel García Márquez Has Died

GabrielColumbian author Gabriel García Márquez has passed away. He was 87-years-old.

In 2012, Márquez’s brother Jaime revealed that the beloved writer was suffering from dementia. Earlier this month, he was hospitalized in Mexico City.

Throughout his career, Márquez wrote nonfiction, short stories, news articles, and novels including his best known works, One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967) and Love in the Time of Cholera (1985). In 1982, he won the the Nobel Prize in Literature and accepted the award by delivering his now famous speech, “The Solitude of Latin America.” (via Latin Times)

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Author Sherwin B. Nuland Has Died

sherwinnulandAuthor Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland has passed away. He died of prostate cancer. He was 83 years old.

Nuland was the author of How We Die, a nonfiction work about assisted suicide. The book won a National Book Award in 1994 and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the Book Critics Circle Award in 1995. He also wrote Doctors: The Biography of Medicine, Medicine: The Art of Healing, The Wisdom of the Body, and The Mysteries Within: A Surgeon Reflects on Medical Myths.

He regularly wrote a column on medicine and biomedical ethics called “The Uncertain Art,” for The American Scholar. He was also contributing editor to The American Scholar and The New Republic.

Nuland served as clinical professor of Surgery at the Yale School of Medicine, and as Chairman of the Board of Managers of the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. He was also a member of the editorial board of Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, and a member of the Bioethics Committee of Yale New Haven Hospital. (Via NPR Books).

 

Maggie Estep Has Died

maggieestepSlam poet Maggie Estep has died. She was 50 years old. According to a report in The New York Times, Estep died of a heart attack.

Estep was the author of seven books: Diary of an Emotional Idiot; Soft Maniacs; Love Dance of the Mechanical Animals; Hex; Gargantuan; Flamethrower; and Alice Fantastic. She also recorded two spoken word CDs: No More Mr. Nice Girl and Love is a Dog From Hell

Estep has also given readings of her work at venues throughout the U.S. and Europe, as well as on The Charlie Rose Show, MTV, PBS, and HBO’s “Def Poetry Jam.” According to her website, she was working on The Story of Giants when she passed away.

Poet Maxine Kumin Has Died

maxinekuminU.S. poet laureate Maxine Kumin has died at the age of 88, reports The Associated Press. Kumin, the author of dozens of poems, as well as works of fiction, nonfiction and a memoir, won the Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for “Up Country.”

Here is more from the AP: “The Bennett Funeral Home in Concord says Kumin, who wrote more than three dozen books of poetry, fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature, died Thursday at her home in Warner after a year of failing health. Kumin was an advocate for women writers, human and political justice and animal rights. Her final work, “And Short the Season,” is scheduled to be released later this year.”

Kumin got her start publishing poems in The New Yorker. The magazine has paid tribute to the poet by sharing an audio recording of Kumin reading “Truth.”

Juan Gelman Has Died

downloadBlobPoet Juan Gelman has passed away. He was 83-years-old.

Gelman established his writing career by working as a journalist and writing more than 20 volumes of poetry. According to The Telegraph, Gelman (pictured, via) published his first poem when he was 11-years-old.

In 2007, the Ministry of Culture of Spain crowned him the winner of a lifetime achievement award, the Miguel de Cervantes Prize. In addition to his writing, NPR reports that Gelman became well known in his native Argentina for speaking out against the country’s “‘dirty war’ of the ’70s and ’80s.” (via Entertainment Weekly)

Comic Book Artist Nick Cardy Has Died

aquamanVeteran comic book artist Nick Cardy has died. He was 93 years old.

Cardy was best known for his work with DC Comics and his work drawing Teen Titans and Aquaman. According to NickCardy.com, Cardy worked for the Iger/Eisner studio drawing for Fight Comics, Jungle Comics, Kaanga Comics for Fiction House. In the fifties he drew the Tarzan comic strip. When he started his career at DC Comics, he drew The Legends of Daniel Boone, a comic with only a couple of issues. In the 1970s he created artwork for movie posters including: Apocalypse Now, Movie, Movie and California Suite.

In 2005, Cardy was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame. (Via Comicbook.com)

 

Ann Jonas Has Died

9780688099862Picture book creator Ann Jonas has passed away. She was 81-years-old.

Jonas studied at Cooper Union. She worked in the graphic design industry prior to establishing a career as a writer and illustrator.

Here’s more from Publishers Weekly: “She published her first picture book, When You Were a Baby, in 1982, and 15 additional titles, many released by Greenwillow, followed. Her books include Round Trip (1983), an ALA Notable Book and a New York Times Best Illustrated Book, The Quilt (1984), Color Dance (1989), Aardvarks, Disembark! (1990), Splash! (1995), Watch William Walk (1997), and Bird Talk (1999).

Oscar Hijuelos Has Died

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Cuban American novelist Oscar Hijuelos has passed away. He was 62 years old.

He became the first Latino to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction with The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love in 1989. Hijuelos wrote eight novels and a memoir called Thoughts Without Cigarettes. In an interview about that memoir, the novelist reflected on his early inspiration as a kid growing up in New York City:

I don’t think the New York of my youth did a “better job” of fostering creativity, which comes from within and not from without, but it did offer the average kid a much broader range of choices in terms of affordable and inspiring activities; just about everything was much cheaper. And there were a greater range of interesting mom-and-pop shops to enjoy: For example, I miss the old second-hand bookstores that one could find on Fourth Avenue and getting lost in that world. Surely you can find the same stuff these days on the Internet, but it’s just not as much fun. I can remember how one could walk into the Pierpont Morgan Library for free—now it’s about twenty dollars—and the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a buck or two, or see a Broadway show for ten bucks.

Tom Clancy Has Died

TomClancy304Bestselling novelist Tom Clancy has passed away, ending a legendary career in espionage fiction.

Three of his books were turned into movies: The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, and The Sum of All Fears. His work was adapted into a number of video game franchises, including: Rainbow Six, Ghost Recon and Splinter Cell. CNN had the sad news:

[Clancy] died on Tuesday in a hospital in Baltimore. He was 66. The author Tom Clancy in 1996. Ivan Held, the president of G. P. Putnam’s Sons, his publisher, did not provide a cause of death.

Robert Barnard Has Died

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UK crime novelist Robert Barnard has passed away. He was 76-years-old.

Throughout the course of his career, Barnard (pictured, via) wrote 40 books and earned eight Edgar Award nominations. He enjoyed a following both in his native Great Britain and the United States. Here’s more from the New York Times:

Mr. Barnard called his work ‘entertainment’ and ‘deliberately old-fashioned.’ His murders, set mainly in small villages drolly christened with names like ‘Hexton-on-Weir’ and ‘Twytching,’ were plotted with an ingenuity and precision that made him popular among aficionados of what is known in publishing as the English cozy — mysteries with a picturesque setting, colorful locals and minimal violence. Reviewers said that many of his books crossed into the comedy-of-manners genre.

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