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Only 17% of Parents Say Reading is Top Priority This Summer: Study

bebooksmartOnly 17 percent of parents say reading is a top summer priority. This depressing news is according to a new survey from Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) and Macy’s. Harris Interactive surveyed more than 1,000 parents with children ages 5-11 online in April to come to this conclusion.

The research also found that kids spend almost three times as many hours a week watching TV or playing video games as they do reading in the summer months. In fact, kids spend an average 17.4 hours a week watching TV or playing video games and only 5.9 hours a week on average reading. The study did reveal that parents who emphasize reading are twice as likely to have a child that reads every day. For those kids that do read, the research found that 83 percent prefer print books to eBooks.

To help promote summer reading and literacy in general, Macy’s and RIF have launched their 11th annual Be Book Smart campaign today. The effort encourages Macy’s customers to donate $3 at any Macy’s store register which will help fund children’s literacy efforts. Shoppers that do so will get $10 off a purchase of $30 or more. The campaign runs through July 13.

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Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

The Self-Published Book Market Grew 79% in the UK in 2013: Nielsen

nielsenbooksSelf-publishing is taking off in the UK. In fact, the self-publishing market grew by 79 percent in 2013 in the UK, according to new research presented by Steve Bohme, research director at Nielsen Book, at the Literary Consultancy conference this morning in London.

The Guardian has the scoop: “With print sales falling by 10% last year, and book purchasing as a whole down 4%, ebook sales continue to grow, according to Nielsen’s comprehensive tracking of book purchases, up 20% in the UK in 2013, with 80m ebooks bought by UK consumers, to a value of £300m. But it is the DIY market which is showing the most eye-watering growth, up 79% to 18m self-published titles purchased, worth £59m, according to the statistics released on Friday.”

While self-published books are on a rising trajectory, they still only represent a small portion of the overall publishing market in the UK.  In fact, according to the report, this portion of the market only accounts for 5 percent of the total books bought and only 3 percent of the money spent on books last year. However Nielsen expects these numbers to continue to grow.

 

 

eBooks Expected to Outsell Print in the UK by 2018: Report

samsungkindleeBooks will outsell print books in the UK by 2018, according to a new report from Pricewaterhouse Coopers (PwC).

The company made the prediction based on the fact that the eBook market is growing steadily in the UK. According to the report, eBooks represented 18 percent of all book revenue last year and this will grow to 41 percent by 2018.

“The entertainment and media industry is at the forefront of the digital revolution, because so many of its products and services can already be delivered in digital form,” stated Phil Stokes, Entertainment and Media lead partner at PwC. ”It may not be long before digital revenues from print, film, publishing and music overtake physical revenues in some markets. Media companies don’t need a digital strategy anymore; they need a business strategy, and a business model, which is fit for the digital age.”

Fewer Kids Are Reading For Fun: Common Sense Media Study

kidreading

Fewer American children are reading for pleasure than they have in the past, according to a new report from Common Sense Media.

The research revealed that the number of nine-year-old kids that read for pleasure once or more per week went from 81 percent in 1984 to 76 percent in 2013. The numbers are worse for older kids. Only about a third of 13-year-olds reported reading for pleasure less than twice a year.

Children who do indulge in reading for pleasure tended to be those kids whose parents read to them and whose parents read themselves. Those kids who are read to spend about 30-60 minutes a day reading.

Print Textbooks Lead to Higher Reading Comprehension Than Digital: Study

ipad304Digital textbooks may not be as powerful of learning tools as print textbooks. According to new research from West Chester University professors Heather Ruetschlin Schugar and Jordan T. Schugar, when middle school students were given the same reading assignment in print versus digital, the readers’ comprehension was higher when they read print books than when they read eBooks.

The professors presented their findings at the American Educational Research Association in Philadelphia. The report suggests that enhancements in eBooks such as games and activities actually take away from reading comprehension.

The New York Times has more: “Such flourishes can interrupt the fluency of children’s reading and cause their comprehension to fragment, the authors found. They can also lead children to spend less time reading over all: One study cited by Ms. Smith and the Schugars reported that children spent 43 percent of their e-book engagement time playing games embedded in the e-books rather than reading the text.”

Rich People Read More Than Poor People in the UK: Booktrust

booktrustSocioeconomic background has a lot to do with how much people read in the UK. According to a new report from Booktrust, which includes survey results from 1,500 adults, the more money you have, the more likely you are to read and vice versa.

Twenty-seven percent of adults from the poorest socio-economic backgrounds revealed that never read books, while only 13 percent of the richest people surveyed admitted to never reading books. In addition, the report found that 62 percent of richest respondents admitted reading daily or weekly, whereas 42 percent of the poorest respondents read that often. Not surprisingly, richer people own twice as many books as poorer people.

Despite discrepancies in access to books and the time spent reading, most of the interview subjects agreed that reading improves their lives. According to the report, 76 percent of survey respondents said that reading improves their lives. Broken down into socioeconomic background, 83 percent of rich adults and  72 percent of poor adults admitted this. (Via The BBC).

Women Still Lag Behind in Book Reviews: VIDA

vidagraphBooks written by women are reviewed on average much less than books written by men, according to the annual VIDA count a report that tracks gender inequality in literary publications.

The organization looked at the number of women whose books were reviewed, as well as the number of female reviewers in 39 literary publications and found that some are more gender balanced than others.  Gender-biased publications included The New York Review of Books which published 212 book reviews written by male reviewers in 2013, and only 52 by female reviewers. In addition, The London Review of Books reviewed 245 books written by men last year and only 72 written by women.

Not every publication was so biased. The Paris Review was very balanced with 47 men and 48 women represented overall. Granta reviewed books by 30 females and 36 males.

Children Read an Average of 40 Minutes a Day

thefamiliesinmediaprojectChildren ages 2-10 are reading an average of 40 minutes per day, spending 29 minutes reading print, 8 minutes reading on computers, and 5 minutes reading on digital platforms, according to a new report from The Joan Ganz Cooney Center called Learning at Home.

For the study, the organization spoke to more than 1500 parents of 2-10 year olds across the country. According to the report, 62 percent of these kids have access to eReaders or tablets, but only 31 percent actually use these devices because their parents want them to read print books.

While reading is definitely an important part of a child’s day, TV dominates. The research revealed that  children spend an average of 42 minutes a day watching educational TV.

54% of eReading Kids Ask to Buy a Print Copy of an eBook They Already Own

dbwChildren’s adoption of eBooks is on the rise, and two-thirds of children 13 and under now report reading digital books, according to a new survey from Digital Book World and PlayCollective’s research arm, PlayScience. Among these young readers that read eBooks, 92 percent of them read a digital book every week.

The report is the final in a three-part study. The first of which came out last January and the second which was published in July 2013. The latest figures reveal that the daily and weekly reading of eBooks among this age group went up with 50 percent of 2-5 year olds that read eBooks do so daily. In addition, 44 percent of older kids that read eBooks do so daily.

According to the report, 48 percent of parents reported that their children have asked to purchase the print edition of an eBook that they have read or already own, with 54 percent requesting the print version of a book that they already own. Kids prefer reading on tablets, acceding to the study. Parents prefer to pay $3.50-9.oo for eBooks, and pay an average of $7.00 on eBooks for their kids.

50% of Americans Cite the Internet as Main Source of News: Pew

pewnewssource

Half of the American public now cites the Internet as its main channel for accessing national and international news, according to Pew Research. While the Internet as a news source grew since 2011, so too did television, and radio. Only newspapers suffered a drop.

This fact comes from an interesting list of end of the year data points about American culture  that Pew Research has put together. Among the news items, in 2013, for the first time ever, the majority of American adults owns a smartphone.

We are also living in an era in which the public widely distrusts the federal government. Here is more from the report: “For the first time, a majority of the public (53%) says that the federal government threatens their personal rights and freedoms.”

 

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