AppNewser Appdata 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Chris Anderson’

The Long Tail & The Art of War Adapted as Comic Books

Beginning in April, Round Table Companies will offer comic book adaptations of best-selling nonfiction books.

Here’s more from the press release: “In partnership with Smarter Comics, Round Table Companies will release six comic books on April 16, 2011 in bookstores throughout the U.S. and Indigo bookstores in Canada, as well as in Hudson News stores on May 1, 2011. Additionally, readers can download a digital version of the books for free, online or on the SmarterComics Android applications from April 1 to July 1, 2011.”

The titles up for adaptation include The Long Tail by Chris AndersonOverachievement by Dr. John EliotHow to Master the Art of Selling by Tom Hopkins, Mi Barrio by Robert Renteria, Shut Up, Stop Whining & Get a Life by Larry Winget, and The Art of War by Sun Tzu.

Read more

Sponsored Post

Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Investor Group Led by Kohlberg & Company Acquires Majority of Thomas Nelson’s Stock

tnlogo.jpgToday a group of investors led by Kohlberg & Company acquired a majority of Christian publisher Thomas Nelson’s stock–a move that will resolve most of the publisher’s long term debt.

The publisher also announced some changes in the board of directors, adding Open Road CEO Jane Friedman and “senior executives of Kohlberg & Company” to the board. In addition, Thomas Nelson CEO Michael Hyatt has been named chairman of the board of directors.

Kohlberg & Company partner Chris Anderson had this statement: “Thomas Nelson remains the clear leader in the Christian publishing world and is poised for growth in this new era. Mike and his team have done an excellent job managing the company through the challenges of the recession and we stand behind them as we enter the future.”

Forget Free–Freemium is the Future

andersonfree.jpgAt the Web 2.0 Expo yesterday, GalleyCat correspondent Cynthia P. Shannon sat in on the panel discussion, Cha-Ching!: How to Cash in with a Freemium Business Model. The panel was moderated by Wired editor and author Chris Anderson–who wrote the book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price.”

Shannon summarized: “Anderson admitted that during the first decade of the web, everything was free. But free doesn’t work anymore–it was never a viable business model. Freemiums–tiered layers of value–are the way to go, and Pandora, Animoto, and Skype have all witnessed success with this concept.”

Her report continued: “There was lots of talk about the iPad and how apps will change, how mobile devices in general are offering a way to enhance the freemiums. As usual, publishers should take their lessons from the music world. Pandora makes a great case study for this, and publishers should check out the site (chances are, all the editorial assistants are already using Pandora).”

She added: “Anderson noted that he was at a textbook convention the other week, and that his insight there was that textbooks might soon be free, and that those savings can then be applied to getting students an iPad (thus reducing the load they carry to school AND providing access to richer content). The things that will be paid for are the test preps, etc.”

Shannon concluded: “I went up to Anderson to ask about how this applies to trade book publishers. He responded that publishers need the help of retailers to define and implement the pay model. They also need to consider how freemiums apply on a global scale, since copyright is a major issue in print … For authors who are yet to be published, his advice is to make it simple and clear–defining exactly what you’re willing to give away. Don’t try to do too much. For example, consider giving away 10,000 downloads of the book, and then let the actual sales of the book turn it into a bestseller.”

Indie Bookstore eBook Dilemma

changinghandslogo.jpgAs the publishing world debated delays in eBooks this week, another, no less important conversation sprang up on Twitter about the difficulty of bundling digital and print content for indie publishers.

To find out more, GalleyCat caught up with Brandon Stout (the “book-besotted PR and design guy” from Changing Hands Bookstore). His commentary was honest and compelling, and we’ve included most of his email interview here: “Our marketing department met one afternoon with the idea that we’d ‘figure out’ eBooks once and for all, including how to bundle them with hardcover purchases–even if it meant giving them away at cost,” explained Stout.

“The more we looked, the more we found that eBook pricing wasn’t just bloated, it was erratic. No clear patterns emerged. Worse still, from publisher to publisher and from book to book we had no reliable way of determining our cost, which of course makes selling eBooks at cost problematic. Very quickly the fantasy that eBooks would be the great equalizer, that they would allow us to compete with Amazon and B&N, vanished.”

He continued: “To make bundling viable at Changing Hands–to make e-books viable for indies at all, really–it’s not enough to sell them at cost. We’d have to sell at a significant loss. Jeff Bezos, as you know, is working to recalibrate public expectation to $9.99 for e-books, and Cory Doctorow and Chris Anderson are working to recalibrate that recalibration to free. Meanwhile, as independent booksellers wait for pricing to come down and DRM issues to shake out, Amazon tightens its grip on early tech adopters — readers who will be far less likely to abandon their Kindles when indies finally limp into the game.”

After jump, Stout offers some suggestions for the future.

Read more

‘The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind’

At 14 years old, William Kamkwamba wanted to do something to help his family, his parents and six sisters, survive the famine that was spreading across Malawi. The drought had already meant his father, a farmer, didn’t have enough money to send William to school. So William improvised. He went to a local library, and with limited English skills began reading books about science. He then began making several trips to the local junkyard and before too long he’d had the requisite parts to build a windmill. He knew if he could proved electricity to his home his mother’s life would be easier, and if the windmill could pump water from the earth, his father wouldn’t have to depend on the rain from the skies.

William tells this story in “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind” along with former Associated Press journalist Bryan Mealer. William and Bryan kicked off a three week book tour last night at a party at Manhattan’s Metropolitan Tower. The party, sponsored by The Harnisch Foundation was attended by several TED fellows, including TED curator Chris Anderson. William told his story at TEDGlobal in 2007.

Last night, we talked with the authors and began by asking Bryan how he first learned of William’s story:

Physics Professor Disputes “Free”

A University of California at Berkeley physics professor disputed Chris Anderson‘s explanation of his publishing success, arguing that free web videos (embedded above) did not help him seal a book deal.

According to The Chronicle of Higher Education, Anderson’s “Free: The Future of a Radical Price” explains how professor Richard A. Muller secured a book deal with W.W. Norton for “Physics for Future Presidents” following a similarly-named set of YouTube lectures. The physics professor argued that “correlation is not causation,” and gave evidence that web celebrity did not sell more copies of his book.

Here’s more from the article: “‘That is wishful thinking from someone who is trying to conclude that Webcasts lead to money’…’Norton wasn’t really interested in my online popularity,’ Mr. Muller continued. ‘Best guess: they know that people who buy and read books are a very small population, and probably not the same as those who watch Webcasts of lectures.’” (via jafurtado)

“Free” Viewed 17,700 Times for Free

andersonfree.jpgIn a move that will test both the premise of his new book and the online reading habits of his audience, Wired editor and author Chris Anderson is letting people read his entire book for free on Scribd. Already more than 17,700 readers have viewed the book.

In his new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price,” the editor proposes that free content can help create business in 21st Century economy–from publishing to the music industry. Last month Anderson caused a stir when he admitted to including unattributed Wikipedia passages in his manuscript, and the Scribd edition includes new annotations for these parts.

Here’s more from the release: “Scribd is kicking off ‘Liberate the Written Word Month at Scribd’ with the release of Chris Anderson’s book “Free,” an e-book exclusive, available to read in full and for FREE for an entire month. This is the fully annotated version (with Wikipedia references) not currently available in print.”

Exclusive: CNBC Anchor David Faber on Long-Form Reporting

38827917.JPGEarlier this week, GalleyCat mingled with news anchors and cable personalities in the posh Bookmarks Lounge during the launch party for CNBC reporter David Faber‘s new book, “And Then the Roof Caved In: How Wall Street Greed and Stupidity Brought Capitalism to Its Knees.”

We caught up with Faber for an exclusive interview, finding out how he built a nonfiction book out of his long-form documentary piece–a powerful combination in this multimedia world. “When you do all that reporting for a documentary–the year we spent on the reporting–two hours wasn’t enough room to say everything we wanted to say,” he explained.

“There’s so much interest, source material, and reporting that I did for CNBC, so there was an opportunity to make a book out of it … if there’s a willingness for the reporter to go home at night and write, it will make a great companion to a documentary.”

GalleyCat also asked the CNBC reporter about the endless churn of the new media news cycle, a process that drives some writers to cut corners–as we saw yesterday when author Chris Anderson admitted to including unattributed Wikipedia passages in his new book. Faber had an old-school journalism response…

Read more

VQR Reporter Absolves Chris Anderson of ‘Malice’

canderson_free.jpgOur blogging sibling FishbowlNY landed a publishing scoop–interviewing the Virginia Quarterly Review journalist who uncovered unattributed Wikipedia passages in Chris Anderson‘s new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price.”

VQR writer Waldo Jaquith was reading an advance copy of “Free” when he checked Wikipedia for a reference question, and spotted some alarming similarities in the copy. Even though Jaquith was the first to discover these lifted passages, he told FishbowlNY’s Amanda Ernst that he didn’t see “malice” in Anderson’s actions.

Here’s more from the post: “Ultimately, Jaquith said he thinks Anderson’s description of the plagiarism as an oversight seems genuine. ‘I’m not able to peek into his motives, but you’d have to be mentally ill to do this on purpose,’ he said. ‘To assign malice to this would mean something was seriously wrong with him.’”

Chris Anderson’s Mistake: Common or Careless?

canderson_free.jpgAs the literary world debates unattributed lines from Wikipedia in Chris Anderson‘s new book, “Free: The Future of a Radical Price,” one writer left some words of support.

“I’m surprised that the VQN is coming down so hard on you about it. It’s obvious you didn’t try to pull a fast one,” wrote author Mark Frauenfelder. “You just made a mistake of carelessness, which is human and forgivable.” At the same time, the writer wondered if companies exist–like Turnitin–to make sure that notes didn’t get absorbed into text.

What do the nonfiction writers in the audience think? Frauenfelder raises a point about a cut-and-paste writing world: “I think many non-fiction writers share the same nagging fear that their source notes will accidentally get mixed into the manuscript without proper attribution. Because it’s so easy to copy and paste, this kind of thing is going to happen to other writers. I’m working on a book now and I really hope I haven’t screwed up! I wonder if there’s some kind of company I can hire to check my manuscript before the book gets published?”

NEXT PAGE >>