InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘NPR’

NPR Hosting Olympics-Inspired Poetry Games

In the ancient tradition of connecting poetry with the Olympics, this week NPR is hosting the NPR Poetry Games, a sports-inspired poetry contest.

All week NPR is bringing together poets from around the world who will recite their works in a friendly competition. The contest features the poets Kazim Ali from the United States; Ales Steger from Slovenia; Mbali Vilakazi from South Africa; Monica de la Torre from Mexico; and Ouyang Yu from China and Australia.

Every morning, NPR listeners can hear the poems read on the show Morning Edition. Listeners are invited to vote on their favorite poem at www.npr.org/poetrygames, where audio recordings and texts of the poems will be saved. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

Steve Oney To Write Book on ‘History, Trials & Tribulations’ of NPR

The House of Representatives voted 228-192 to defund National Public Radio this afternoon. This week Steve Oney (author of And the Dead Shall Rise) landed a book deal to write a book on “the history, trials and tribulations of NPR.”

The Kneerim & Williams Agency negotiated the deal with Ben Loehnen at Simon & Schuster. Publisher  Jonathan Karp had this statement: “We’re delighted to have acquired Steve Oney’s exploration of the personalities and conflicts at NPR.  This is the rare media story that transcends the industry and speaks to larger cultural issues, and we believe this book will offer valuable insights into the workings of an important and intriguing journalistic organization.”

Follow this link to learn more how to support the embattled institution.

Media Wants to Click on Them



David Shipley
and Will Schwalbe seem to be the It Boys of publishing this week (not to mention the talk of the town) as they and their new book SEND get written up in USA Today, New York and now the Observer. Not bad at all for a little book on the etiquette of sending and receiving email (one that’s an entertaining refresher on common sense) though the attention is probably magnified by the authors’ respective day jobs: Shipley is the New York Times’ Op-Ed editor while Schwalbe is Hyperion‘s editor-in-chief.

So how did they write the book? Not in the way you think. “We wrote it side by side, his place and my place,” Shipley explained to the Observer’s Spencer Morgan. “Maybe because we’re both editors, there was less of a sense of ownership in terms of how you write, and maybe the speechwriting was helpful for me in that regard-because I wrote speeches for Clinton, and that’s more of a collaborative process than going off somewhere in the woods and writing. But it really was just weekends, early in the morning, late at night, just sitting side by side writing.”

And the media bubble is only beginning: SEND and its authors are slated to appear on Good Morning America, NPR, Amazon’s Fishbowl and much, much more. “We’ve arrived at a juncture in our civilization where there is a clear need for this book,” said Paul Bogaards, executive director of publicity at Knopf. “So people either need to master [e-mail], or they become its slave.”

The Daily Show Sells Books – Who’d Have Thunk?

The New York Times’ Julie Bosman adopts a sense of gee-whizness in this piece about how Comedy Central‘s flagship satirical show brings on serious authors – and how their books sell in massive quantities thereafter. Of course, let’s remember that if 1.5 million people watch the show, and if 1/10th of the audience (or less) buys books, voila! Instant bestseller (see, BOOK, AMERICA THE.) So the numbers for stardom don’t have to be all that high. Still, the number of serious authors talking to Jon Stewart (and Stephen Colbert on THE COLBERT REPORT) has gone up in the last few years as the number of venues for them dry up elsewhere. Publishers say that particularly for the last six months, both shows have become the most reliable venues for promoting weighty books whose authors would otherwise end up on THE EARLY SHOW on CBS looking like they showed up at the wrong party.

“It was almost an ‘oh my God’ moment,” said Lissa Warren, publicity director for Da Capo Press. “There aren’t that many television shows that will have on serious authors. And when they do have one, it’s almost startling.” Part of the surprise, publishers said, is that the Comedy Central audience is more serious than its reputation allows. They aren’t just YouTube obsessives but a much more diverse – and book-buying – audience. “It’s the television equivalent of NPR,” Martha Levin, publisher of Free Press, said. “You have a very savvy, interested audience who are book buyers, people who do go into bookstores, people who are actually interested in books.”