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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Matheson’

Richard Matheson Has Died

The great science fiction, fantasy and horror writer Richard Matheson has passed away, ending what one fellow writer called “a supernova lifetime of writing.”

Matheson wrote many books, including: The Shrinking ManWhat Dreams May Come and I Am Legend. Macmillan has a long list of his great books.

Personally, I will never forget reading The Shrinking Man as a teenager, blown away by the cosmic themes explored inside that slender book. Many of his books were turned into classic films, but his novels deserve to be remembered by themselves as well.

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Mediabistro Course

Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

Jonathan Maberry: ‘Get your butt in a chair & write.’

Have you ever written a scary story? In honor of the Halloween season, we are interviewing horror writers to learn about the craft of scaring readers. Recently, we spoke with author Jonathan Maberry.

Throughout Maberry’s career, he has won multiple Stoker Awards for his horror work. Last month, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers released the third installment of the Rot & Ruin series, Flesh & Bone.

He has written for Marvel Comics and published multiple novels for both adults and young-adults. As a nonfiction writer, Maberry has examined topics ranging from martial arts to zombie pop culture. Check out the highlights from our interview below…

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Best Netflix Streaming Movies for Readers: Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature

netflixlogo.pngThousands of Netflix users enjoy the “Watch Instantly” section of the popular DVD rental website–streaming movies straight to their computers or televisions. Still, it can be difficult to find the perfect movie amid the overwhelming selection.

To help literary minded movie fans with Netflix accounts surf through the overwhelming selection, here are our ten favorite Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature from the “Watch Instantly” section of Netflix. We also made a list of the ten best plays adapted into films that you can watch instantly on Netflix. Add your favorites from the Dramas Based on Contemporary Literature in the comments–we’ll do more lists for other adaptation categories soon.

Starting Out in the Evening: This Brian Morton novel adaptation stars the brilliant Frank Langella

Devil in a Blue Dress: Denzel Washington stars in this smoking adaptation of Walter Mosley‘s novel.

Iris: A critically-acclaimed adaptation of John Bayley‘s memoir about author Iris Murdoch.

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Donnie Darko Meets Richard Matheson

“Donnie Darko” director Richard Kelly has adapted one of science fiction’s more memorable concepts, turning Richard Matheson‘s 1970 short story “”Button, Button” into a full-length thriller.

Entitled “The Box,” the film stars Cameron Diaz and James Marsden, and comes out October 30th. In an interview with the director, SciFiWire outlines the film’s premise: a young couple could receive one million dollars at the push of a button, but if they accept, someone they don’t know will die.

Here’s an explanation from Kelly, taken from the interview: “Can they survive this? Can they uncover the truth, and can they redeem themselves and save themselves, perhaps? For me, that became the jumping-off point … It felt like it could be the first act of an entire film, and it felt like something that was sort of asking to be resolved, in my mind. But resolved in a way that hopefully was still very faithful to the spirit of what I believe that Matheson was kind of trying to say in a nutshell: … that the pushing of the button, … it’s the key to the downfall of man.”