A new paper by Jason Fletcher, professor at Yale’s School of Public Health, revealed in a new study that young people diagnosed with ADHD are approximately 10 to 14 percentage points less likely to be employed. And get this — if they are employed, their income will be  33 percent less than their peers without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

The impact is greatest for minorities and the poor but overall the study examined students between the seventh an twelfth grade in the 1994 – 95 school year. Considering they were children in the ’80s, that’s also a time when ADHD diagnoses weren’t as common and access to drugs such as Ritalin weren’t readily available.

Let’s check out the two graphs, courtesy of Fletcher’s research:

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