TVNewser Show TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Fashion/Beauty

Getting Inked for Income? Company Offers Raises if Employees Get Tattoos of Logo

While many companies may reward employees’ loyalty, New York City real estate company Rapid Realty is asking for a lifelong commitment in exchange for a bump in pay; any employee willing to tattoo the company’s logo on their body will automatically receive a fifteen percent raise.

Selling your own skin as billboard space? Crazy, right? That’s what we thought, but apparently at least forty Rapid Realty employees have already deemed the bribe worth the body art.

Stephanie Barry justified her decision with hard-to-deny simplicity, telling CBS: “I was like, why am I throwing my money away when I could give myself from $25,000 to $40,000 for the same amount of work?” And she’s not alone. Since there are no size or location restrictions, workers have gotten creative, one person getting inked stealthily behind her ear.

Not everyone is buying in, though. When CBS asked non-Rapid Realty-employees if they would do the same thing at their jobs, responses ranged from “[the reward] would have to be extraordinary” and “It’s a scar for life. I have enough of those.”

What about you, readers? Would you be a walking billboard for a hefty pay raise? Tell us in the comments section.

‘Great Gatsby’ Movie Promotions and Parties Capture Glamorous 1920s New York Lifestyle

The New York metro area is giddy about The Great Gatsby, and for good reason. The highly anticipated movie, to be released on May 10, stars Leonardo DiCaprio as Jay Gatsby and Carey Mulligan as Daisy Buchanan. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s legendary novel of the same name was set on the north shore, or Gold Coast, of Long Island.

Locals are already enjoying movie tie-ins galore, including Tiffany’s ‘Gatsby’-inspired jewelry collection, Prada’s exhibit of movie costumes and Brooks Brother’s new menswear line. The Plaza Hotel’s ‘is unveiling a Gatsby’ suite. Long Island’s historic north shore mansions inspired the cinematic backdrop, so they’re getting in on the action with springtime ‘Gatsby’ galas.

Here’s what we’ve gleaned about the glitzy goods and the upcoming festivities:

Tiffany’s Collection: The luxury jewelry brand, where Fitzgerald was a client, is showcasing a series of 1920s era windows at its Fifth Avenue flagship store. On the main floor, dazzling art deco items are on display. The fourth floor is showing clips from the movie and interviews with designer Catherine Martin, wife of ‘Gatsby director Baz Luhrmann. Nearby are cases of crystal bowls, diamond tiaras and chandelier earrings.

Brooks Brothers’ Clothing Line: Fitzgerald was also a fan of the clothing brand, which has long served affluent customers. The retailer designed the movie’s menswear and recently launched a ‘Great Gatsby’ line. The limited edition clothing interprets the film’s period looks with items such as waistcoats and formal wear. Brooks Brothers is also highlighting its ‘Gatsby’ connection with different window displays at each of its New York City stores.

Prada’s SoHo Store Exhibit: Famed Italian designer Miuccia Prada created the “period accurate but modern” women’s costumes for The Great Gatsby. Starting today, those stylish fashions are being shown at Prada’s store in New York’s SoHo neighborhood. Items include dresses and accessories, in addition to sketches and behind-the-scenes photos.

Read more

What’s the Public’s F*#king Deal with Profanity?

The most compelling aspect of public relations is that the public keeps changing. Our attitudes toward everything in life from sexuality to profanity constantly evolve, and this makes understanding the public more of an art than a science.

Philips Norelco knows this. That’s why the razor brand took a slight risk in dropping a bleeped-out F-bomb in its most recent commercial, “I’d Date Me.” Regardless of your moral compass, we think it’s pretty funny. (Watch the video above and see if you agree.)

Perhaps what Philips Norelco knows is that there is nothing funnier than absurdity, and there is nothing more absurd than thinking bleeping out a bad word will spare anyone from knowing what word is being smothered. It’s not like these commercials are being aired on Nickelodeon.

Saying a profane word makes us listen to it, but bleeping out a profane word makes us say it in our own heads. As PR people, we can’t help but wonder if there will ever be a day when the F-bomb becomes mainstream enough to be pronounced unmolested.

Is the public ready for profanity, or are those words still too offensive?

‘Dove’ Uses Forensic Science to Prove ‘You Are More Beautiful Than You Think’

Women know that we are our own worst critics — at least that’s what our beloved friends and significant others tell us. Now, thanks to Dove‘s latest installment of its Real Beauty campaign (and some CSI-worthy forensic science), we have tangible proof that it’s true.

Dove recruited seven women of different ages and backgrounds to take part in an experiment. Early in the day, these women were asked to spend some time with a group of people they had never met before, but were not told why. Then, they met one-on-one with FBI-trained forensic artist Gil Zamora, who created composite sketches of them based on self-descriptions of their own facial features. Later, the artist met with the people who mingled with these women earlier in the day and drew sketches of the same women based on the way these strangers described them.

In the below video, we hear the women describe themselves by saying things like “my mom told me I had a big jaw,” and “I kind of have a fat, rounder face.” But when others are describing them, they say things like “she has nice eyes that light up when she speaks.” When the portraits are finished, without fail, those created from the observations of others are more flattering than those based on self-descriptions. Read more

Playboy’s New iPhone App Pushes All the Right Buttons

Beyond the beating that email gave to the U.S. Postal Service, it’s difficult to imagine a brand more threatened by the Internet and digital technology than Playboy. We’re a little surprised that the old bunny is still around, because today anyone can access pretty much every imaginable variety of “adult content” with a few simple clicks of a mouse or taps on a touch screen for the low, low price of a few pop-up ads (and a browsing history that might upset the ladies in your life).

How can Playboy even pretend to compete with all that low-to-no-cost content? Answer: The brand will live on by being dogged, resourceful and creative, because the Playboy we know simply won’t go down without a fight (nor should it). For example, the brand’s new iPhone app doesn’t feature nudity, because its makers are abiding by Apple’s content standards while demonstrating some excellent marketing acumen.

Read more

Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola’s Charming Prada Promo Spot

We thought Brad Pitt’s painfully pretentious and nonsensical Chanel no. 5 ad had forever tarnished the concept of high fashion “content marketing” for us, but yesterday we finally came across a spot we can support.

The purpose of this three minute short film, directed by Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola, is to promote Prada‘s new fragrance Candy L’Eau.  The short features all the quirk, charm and sense of humor one might expect from its creators, stars the lovely French actress/model Léa Seydoux and follows a sweet storyline that pays homage to the love triangles of French New Wave cinema. Viewers will likely be so charmed by the spot’s characters and aesthetic that they’ll hardly notice the three explicit brand plugs.

We don’t know about you, readers, but we find this product rollout campaign much more enjoyable than listening to movie stars — however gorgeous they may be — ramble ceaselessly and unintelligibly about fate, life, and the universe (especially on a Friday!).

Victoria’s Secret Gets an Earful from Irate Parents

The public doesn’t appreciate brands that cross invisible but well-established lines in our culture, particularly in the name of greed. For example, don’t break out your storefront Christmas decorations before Thanksgiving Day. Oh, and don’t sell lingerie to girls who are still convinced they’re going to marry Justin Bieber under a rainbow.

By selling lingerie to the “tween” demographic, Victoria’s Secret has broken all sorts of unspoken public relations rules, most importantly “don’t piss off parents”. (We had a feeling this wasn’t going to go over well.) Brands attempting to court the tween demographic should remember one fact: these girls are too young to legally hold jobs, so their primary source of income (and purchasing decisions) is their parents.

Apparently Victoria’s Secret forgot this, didn’t think parents were paying attention, or honestly didn’t believe there was anything inappropriate about a tween girl and her divorced father’s new girlfriend going shopping together for something hot and spicy at the local VS.

Read more

Gillette Uses ‘Real’ Women to Reach Men’s Private Parts

It’s not a public relations or marketing secret that beautiful women have an undeniable influence over men. They just do. And brands would be foolish to ignore the power of attraction and human sexuality when trying to sell products to the “dude demographic.”

We’ve all seen the beer commercials where sleek young women can’t resist men drinking glowing beers in dark bars or the mouthwash spots where guys are denied a kiss from bedmates who don’t appreciate bad breath. The women in these ads are caricatures built to play on our fantasies and fears. It’s advertising 101.

Gillette, however, is taking a more sophisticated approach with its new campaign for the Fusion ProGlide Styler, which is not only designed for the traditional shaving of morning stubble but also for “manscaping” below the neckline — yes, for shaving the chest, back, abs and groin.

Dudes not named Pauly D don’t generally like to hear the details on this sort of thing in TV ads. But women? That’s another story.

Read more

Swedish Retailer Earns Attention for ‘Realistic’ Mannequins

Let’s take a moment to discuss one of the creepiest aspects of in-store shopping: the mannequins. We’re less concerned with the chances of a Valley of the Dolls-style mannequin uprising than the message these unrealistically thin figures send to real flesh-and-blood shoppers.

Most female mannequins are so proportionally ridiculous that even the smallest clothes need to be cinched at the back to keep from hanging loosely off their bony shoulders. And if they were to come to life (see aforementioned uprising scenario), they would be too thin to menstruate. Given these facts, it’s no wonder that when this photo of more realistically-sized mannequins in a Swedish store hit the Internet, the response was an international roar of approval.

A blogger at Women’s Rights News posted the photo of the department store mannequins to Facebook last week, and the comments have been pouring in ever since. Although the dummies still represent the idealized hourglass shape, blonde hair, and fair skin, their softer-looking tummies and fleshier thighs have inspired 61,538 likes and over 19,000 shares as of this writing. The fact that they are dressed in lingerie also helps to perpetuate the idea that this store recognizes its shoppers don’t have to be a size 2 to be sexy.

Read more

PR Stunts: Dove ‘Restores’ Photoshopped Models

It’s been nearly ten years since Dove introduced “Real Beauty“, one of the 2000′s best rebranding campaigns. Its focus on “real-looking” models helped distinguish Dove in the crowded beauty category–and the company’s Canadian division just used a crafty PR stunt to try and extend that winning streak.

First Dove posted a download on Reddit that supposedly offered users a free tool to help retouch photographs by “enhanc[ing] skin tone” and “hiding all the imperfections”–in other words, all the things that Dove’s campaign opposed. But when users pressed the button, this “tool” reversed all the modifications to the image in question. (They could then “undo” the reversal, but the point had been made.)

This “hack” was a sneaky attempt to once again push the claim that Dove keeps things real in an industry dominated by digital tummy tucks, facelifts and tone-ups. In the video below, the company directly calls out “art directors, graphic designers and photo retouchers” for using Photoshop and other tools to promote unrealistic ideals  (never mind the fact that Dove has been accused of doing the very same thing).

Oh, and this is all part of a larger campaign which includes the hashtag #DovePositiveChange and a Facebook “Ad makeover” app which purportedly lets users revise ad spots designed to play on insecurities by promising to help women improve their appearance.

So is this another branding win for Dove, or do they need to stop pushing the same old concept?

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>