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Journalism

Marie Claire Tweets That Kendall Jenner Pioneered Cornrows; Outrage Ensues

kendall-jenner-marie-claireAnd this is why worshiping at the altar of people who have no merit of being idolized is stupid (shout out to entertainment media and everyone who follows Justin Bieber on Twitter).

For those not in the know (or the care), that is Kendall Jenner, a fave of paparazzi vultures everywhere. As you can tell, she thought would braid her hair. You know, as if she has seen it somewhere before but where in the world has she?

Hmmmm… 

Oh yeah, I wonder if she knows anyone who hangs out with black people? Nah, probably not.

I only say that because uber-homogeneous publication Marie Claire tweeted some utter stupidity, claimed those braids were “epic,” and subsequently got a harsh “hello” from this alternative stratosphere called “Black Twitter.”

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Mediabistro Course

Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsStarting April 22, this in-person workshop will teach you the specific ways to incorporate storytelling into your personal and professional life. Students will examine the role of storytelling in business and put their newfound skills into practice with a series of improvisation, writing, and presentation exercises designed to help them uncover personal stories. Register now! 

PR Pros Make 40% More Than Journalists

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Today in We’ve Been Over This Before news, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released its report on the state of the American workforce this week.

Beyond the obvious “retail still doesn’t pay too well” and “office/admin support is the largest occupational group” news, the report did inspire some curious headlines.

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STUDY (and not-so-Breaking-News): Digital Reporting On the Rise

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Yes, behind every online breaking news report is a homeless-looking hipster pushing the buttons.

Everyone, say it with me: “Digital Native News.

ICYMI: This is the future of journalism. Ask any reporter in print, broadcast, or online (obviously, there), and they will tell you the same thing. And although many journalists are unfortunately getting demotions and pink slips in their annual reviews, the Pew Research Center came out with this report about “The Growth in Digital Reporting.”

And the infographic after the jump is worth printing and pasting on your bulletin board.

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Breaking News Just Got Broke All Up in MSNBC’s Chuck Todd’s Behind

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Stay Classy CNN and MSNBC.

BREAKING: Social media has obliterated any hope for broadcast news to break any stories before Twitter gets its talons on it. I understand the hypersensitivity of competition in broadcast news, which is why PR professionals are constantly trying to get their game up. However, lately, “breaking news” seems to be about as overstated as a Kardashian anywhere in the news.

Recently, MSNBC’s Chuck Todd took to Twitter trying to place CNN on blast for its “breaking news” terminology. And then CNN producer Vaughn Sterling returned the volley with some serious stink on it. So great.

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15 Journalistic Clichés That You Should Also Avoid

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We’re sorry to say we missed this Washington Post list of top journalism cliches last month, but it’s a must read.

Writers often lecture PR people about phrases they should studiously avoid in press releases and pitches. But we rarely see such a rundown of easy linguistic standbys that reporters need to ditch along with last year’s BlackBerry.

The best part about this list is that—truth be told—we regularly use many of the suspect phrases ourselves! We used a big one in that last sentence, for example.

So we decided to pick out a few whoppers from the 150(!) to illustrate the fact that journalists are human, too—and sometimes it’s really hard to think of a better way to phrase an idea, especially when you have to write thousands of words a day.

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Ukrainian Comms Pros Launch ‘Crisis Media Center’ as Russian Offensive Proceeds

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On a compelling but somber note, a volunteer team of professionals from at least ten different firms has banded together in the form of the Ukraine Crisis Media Center in order to distribute messages from leaders friendly with protest movement Maidan, which sees itself as the legitimate government of Ukraine. This move comes as Russia continues its campaign to forcibly separate the Crimea region from the rest of the country in the wake of deposed president Viktor Yanukovych’s retreat.

Last weekend we posted on the social media battle for legitimacy currently raging between Putin’s Russia and post-Yanukovych Ukraine—and that messaging conflict will only intensify both leading up to and following the scheduled March 16 secession vote.

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Pope Francis Gets His Own Weekly Magazine, Complete with Centerfold

POPE-master495Since his election to the highest post in Catholicism about a year ago, Pope Francis has captured both the hearts of his followers and plenty of worldwide attention for his progressive ways and social savvy. So, like those of any self-respecting international celebrity, his fans hunger for regular inspiration and inside access to the life of their favorite star.

Now, here to satiate that need is Mio Papa (My Pope), the pope’s very own magazine, which hit Italian newsstands on Ash Wednesday.

The magazine’s editor, Aldo Vitali, told The New York Times, “It’s a sort of fanzine, but of course it can’t be like something you’d do for One Direction…We aim to be more respectful, more noble.”

But with 68 glossy pages boasting photos, papal pronouncements, sneak peeks into his holiness’ personal life, and a pullout centerfold, it’s pretty much exactly like what you’d do for One Direction. Read more

5 Quick Ways to Take Advantage of Sweeps

sweeps bingoBreak out the databases and the brooms, flacks. It’s Sweeps Month!

The word means several things to many people, but in the world of media, it only means one thing — money. And for the world of PR, it should mean one other thing – opportunity. 

You will note every February, May (and July), and November, local TV networks begin to dust off its investigative reporters, gives a raise to its consumer reporters, start to offer more touchy-feely stories before the weather, issue a “three-part series” on such, and acts like the boss is watching.

Because he or she is watching.

“Sweeps” is the time when raises are handed out. Check out national TV. You know how your show breaks for the summer and saves those finales for around May, or before Christmas around November? That’s right. Because people check out for the summer and the holidays since TV doesn’t matter as much. Local networks follow suit, which means flacks have a great opportunity to pull out the greatest hits and, with a little elbow grease, can earn some sweet client hits.

Here are a few ideas how…

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5 Not-So-Secrets to Writing Great Headlines

Headline Writing Tips

You dream about these too? 

I am happy — dare I say, damn proud — to be a Texan. However, I am one of the most enthusiastic fans of the New York Post I know. One reason — headlines.

The copywriters there are allowed to swig Red Bulls until their eyeballs as jittery as Justin Bieber’s hands following a long night out. (Because he’s never used that stuff. Yeah, right.) Some of the most ballsy headlines for major events comes from the scrivener wonderland, and it got me thinking: “How many methods have we forgotten when it comes to writing headlines?”

I’ll bet many. So, here’s the Top 5 for your flacky needs…

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USA Today and the Art of Citing Sources

The great Romensko writes about a small kerfuffle involving Scott Bateman (known as @Disalmanacarian), the esteemed USA Today and a little known act of plagiarism. But wait, we have pictures:

A tale of two weather maps, and evidently, USA Today’s graphics team were snowed in by the dreaded Polar Vortex, so they “borrowed” this map. These meteorological twinkies caused quite the fracas via social media, which caused David Callaway, USA Today’s editor-in-chief to chime in. After the jump, read that and a few other notes…

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