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Posts Tagged ‘magazines’

Highlight Your Clients In This Historic Mag

SaturdayEveningPostThe revered Saturday Evening Post has been around for nearly 300 years, and is still going strong. This general interest pub features a variety of topics, including travel, art, fitness, health and more.

The subjects covered and the pub’s key demographic (40-plus and well educated) are perfect for you PR pros hoping to score your client a spot in a coveted mag. Just be sure you’ve done your research prior to your pitch:

Located in the Post‘s front-of-book, the “Post Its” section is a gathering of various short, newsy pieces that are prime for PR pitches. Specifically, editors are looking for American-made products for the “Made in the USA” column (“We’re interested in products that are beautiful… and also represent something that we are proud is made in the United States,” said editor-in-chief Steve Slon) and fitness trainers for the regular “5 Minute Fitness” tip.

To hear more details on how to get your clients in the mag, including editors’ contact info, read: How To Pitch: The Saturday Evening Post.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsStarting April 22, this in-person workshop will teach you the specific ways to incorporate storytelling into your personal and professional life. Students will examine the role of storytelling in business and put their newfound skills into practice with a series of improvisation, writing, and presentation exercises designed to help them uncover personal stories. Register now! 

Highlight Your Clients in Sports Illustrated For Kids

SIKidsSports Illustrated For Kids is the perfect mag for showcasing products, people or places to the young sports fan.

The pub has plenty of sections ripe for PR pitching, including the “Gotta Get It Guide,” which features sports equipment and other paraphernalia. The mag is also keen to get special access to high-profile athletes. More about the pub:

Sports Illustrated for Kids, launched in 1989, is turning 25 in January 2014. The little brother to Sports Illustrated serves mostly boys (65 percent of its readership) ages 7 to 14, “the age when you’re the most passionate as a sports fan,” says managing editor and publisher Bob DerSI Kids does more than appeal to young sports enthusiasts with cool pictures of their baseball and football idols, pull-out posters, sports cards and games — it also encourages kids to read.

For more pitching advice and editors contact info, read: How To Pitch: Sports Illustrated For Kids.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Your Clients to Hemispheres‘ Culture Section

Hemispheres

Hemispheres, United Airlines’ in flight mag, has been going through some changes lately. Its newest editor-in-chief Jordan Heller is focused on general interest stories more so than your usual travel magazine fare. Good thing too, as the pub reaches more than 12 million fliers a month. Want to get your client in front of those travelers? Luckily for PR pros, the magazine welcomes publicist pitches:

Most of the content in Hemispheres‘ culture sections originate from pitches, and Heller is on the lookout for the latest in everything from food and restaurants to music, film and books. He’s “always happy” to receive pitches on resorts and hotels.

For editors’ contact info and pitching etiquette, read: How To Pitch: Hemispheres.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Helen Gurley Brown, Longtime ‘Cosmo’ Editor, Dead at 90

Ad Age reports that Helen Gurley Brown, who spent more than thirty years as editor of Cosm0poltian after publishing her revolutionary 1962 book Sex and the Single Girl, passed away Monday at the age of 90. She was a true trailblazer in the publishing industry: Under her leadership, Cosmo became a beacon of the sexual revolution and challenged many of the day’s sexist notions, chief among them the widely held beliefs that women need marriage to find fulfillment and that sex should only occur within that august institution. Cosmo grew to be a bible of sorts for independent, fashion-conscious, liberated women–or “Cosmo girls” as Ms. Gurley Brown called them. “Good girls go to heaven,” she often said, “but bad girls go everywhere.”

Even after Bonnie Fuller took over as editor in chief of Cosmo in 1997, Ms. Gurley Brown spent many years overseeing the magazine’s international editions, a position that allowed her to offer her advice to Cosmo-affiliated editors all over the world. In a typically irreverent 2000 interview with Dow Jones Newswires, she noted that these editors were not required to take her advice, but they usually did “because it works.” Who would argue?

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Print Mags Are Back on Top…of Pinterest

So...heavy...You may have heard the news that the public’s long, sordid love affair with print magazines — those prime drivers of the recycling/waste management industry — has come to an end. And yet, scruffy upstarts like Martha Stewart Living, Real Simple and Better Homes and Gardens seem to have gained a new lease on life by way of a fancy new social media site called Pinterest. Sound familiar?

Let’s review the numbers: Social media analytics experts ZoomSphere tell us that print mags occupy at least 15 of the top 50 spots in the fast-growing Pinterest brand hierarchy, with Real Simple currently sitting pretty at number 3. How do they do it? Visualization. These magazines’ art directors know the game and play it well; anyone who has ever read a Real Simple recipe on an iPad can confirm that it’s a lovely, eminently shareable thing.

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